• 121
    The David Frost Show

    The David Frost Show

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    CBS (ended 1972)
    The David Frost Show was hosted by British political satirist David Frost. The show originated in New York and ran 90 minutes (depending on the local stations, it was sometimes cut to one hour). His guests ranged from actors and musicians to lawyers, doctors and politicians. Critics thought the acerbic Frost had sold out, but soon realized that wasn't the case. His manner of interviewing, while sometimes off-putting gave an edge and an insight to the interviewee which was lacking on other talk shows. In the words of Peter Heller, "He is like a bemused and slightly undernourished bird of prey transfixed by a being it finds too fascinating to attack". His catch-phrases ranged from Marvelous! Smashing! Terrific! and It's been a joy having you here! The show ran for three years and during this time David also had a weekly variety program in England and jetted back and forth between shows. This became a great storyline and was used in Here's Lucy television show as an episode, starring David Frost himself, with the Billy Taylor Orchestra providing music. Produced by the Westinghouse Group, The David Frost Show, got its start when Merv Griffin left the afternoon and evening syndication for a late-night network run on CBS, making room for Frost's program to fill the gap. When Merv returned, Frost's program folded.moreless
  • 122
    Hollywood A Go-Go

    Hollywood A Go-Go

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    (ended 1966)
    "Hollywood A Go-Go" was a Los Angeles based rock 'n' roll series hosted by Sam Riddle. The performers included many well known recording artists, as well as regulars The Sinners and The Gazzarri Dancers.

    This 1-hour series was videotaped at KHJ-TV, channel 9. It premiered Dec. 26, 1964 as a local, LA program titled "9th Street a Go Go" (a spin-off of KHJ-TV's weekday series "9th Street West"). By the fifth show (January 23, 1965), it was rechristined "Hollywood a Go Go." In March 1965, the program became nationally syndicated. According to Chicago and New York City TV listings, national syndication began with Show #6. (Since other cities aired the episodes several weeks, or sometimes months, after the LA broadcasts, this guide lists the original LA air dates.)

    Hollywood a Go Go's producer, Al Burton, wanted the set to resemble a Sunset Strip-style nightclub. This look was achieved through the use of lower ceilings, special lighting, and brick walls (which upon closer inspection were actually thin walls with painted-on bricks).

    The Gazzarri Dancers, the show's go-go dancers, also contributed to the nightclub atmosphere. They didn't wear the wholesome, cheerleader-style clothing seen on other rock 'n' roll TV shows. And their dance moves were considered more risqué...at least for mid-1960s television. In a May 1965 article on the rock 'n' roll industry, TIME magazine made the outrageous claim that the Gazzarri Dancers' moves would "bring a blush to the cheeks of a burlesque stripper." The individual dancers were selected by Al Burton, with input from Bill Gazzarri, the owner of Gazzarri's nightclub on Sunset Strip.

    A total of 52 episodes were produced for syndication.

    In 1991, performances from "Hollywood a Go Go" were included in the 10-part A&E series "Golden Age of Rock 'n' Roll" hosted by John Sebastian.

    Special thanks to Ben Chaput for his help on this guide, which wouldn't be possible without his research of Los Angeles TV listings.
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  • 123
    NHL Classics

    NHL Classics

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    NHL - National Hockey League
    NHL Classics from NHL is a series of videos capturing the historic moments from the 1960 thru 2009 season games of the National Hockey League. Included in this series, are the full-length game archives from 2007 to today. Watch historic moments from 1997 Stanley Cup game to see Vladimir Konstantinov crush Peter Forsberg, when the clashes were justified hits and not for retaliation. Relive such exciting moments from a special game or overtime play for your favorite teams. Rejoice with the presentation of trophy's for most valuable player for the playoffs or cheer on your all-time favorites as they defeat their rivals for the first time. Any NHL fan will enjoy watching the game winning goal or their favorite goalie blocking and defeating the advances of a rival team captured in these NHL Classics. Follow the career of your favorite rookie or team or your favorite coach from season to season. See history as records are set, defeats are made and victory is realized.moreless
  • 124
    The Dick Van Dyke Show

    The Dick Van Dyke Show

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    CBS (ended 1966)
    Once Upon a Time... There's a New Show on CBS-TV called The Dick Van Dyke Show debuted on October 3, 1961 and fresh out of the pilot called "Head of the Family" in 1960 as part of "The Comedy Spot". On this Series, Set in New Rochelle, NY at home. The Show focus on Robert "Rob" Petrie is the husband and Father of 1 Child and the Head Writer of the mythical "THE ALAN BRADY SHOW" where his co-writers Maurice "Buddy" Sorrell & Sally Rogers. Buddy Sorrell is a Married Man and he's unflappable and also he can insult Mel Cooley. Sally Rogers is a Single Woman as she's looking for a Husband. Melvin "Mel" Cooley is the Brother-In-Law of the Star of the Show and the unseen wife and The Star of the Show is Alan Brady is egomaniac, arrogant, selfish, obnoxious and stubborn Boss of Rob, Sally & Buddy in New York City. At Home, There's Laura Meeker Petrie is a Sensitive but Nervous and absolute Sexy Wife and Mother of 1 Child when she knows, sees and hears about goings-on of Rob's follies and non-sensible activities. The Child is Richard R. "Richie" Petrie is the 1 and Only Child of Rob & Laura happens to be their own son as he's being obedient and an habit of trouble and very loud when he gets into havoc of his wild fantasies and mischievous schemes and finally The Helpers lived across the street where Millie & Jerry Helper are helping out. Stories relates the trials and tribulations of the Petries, the Helpers and the Writing Staff of "THE ALAN BRADY SHOW". On September 7, 1966 THE DICK VAN DYKE SHOW is hot on CBS-TV when its Cancelled. The Daytime Edition of the show aired reruns from August 1965 to September 1969. Syndicated from 1969 to 1991. From September 1991 to September 1998, Nick-at-Nite aired the show and in 1997, TV LAND airs the show. In 2004 CBS-TV and TV LAND airs the true last episode of the show. -------------- NIELSEN RATINGS (Top 30 or Better) No Ranking in the 1961-1962 Season No. 9 in the 1962-1963 Season No. 3 in the 1963-1964 Season No. 7 in the 1964-1965 Season No. 16 in the 1965-1966 Season No. 12 in the 1965-1966 Season (Daytime) No. 11 in the 1966-1967 Season (Daytime) No. 18 in the 1967-1968 Season (Daytime) No Ranking in the 1968-1969 Season (Daytime) __________ THE BROADCAST HISTORY of The Dick Van Dyke Show October 3, 1961-December 26, 1961 Tuesdays at 8:00-8:30pm January 3, 1962-September 16, 1964 Wednesdays at 9:30-10:00pm September 23, 1964-September 8, 1965 Wednesdays at 9:00-9:30pm September 15, 1965-September 7, 1966 Wednesdays at 9:30-10:00pm on CBS-TV Nighttime. August 2-13, 1965 Monday-Friday at 7:30-8:00am on CBS-TV August 16, 1965-September 2, 1966 Monday-Friday at 11:00-11:30am on CBS-TV September 5, 1966-September 5, 1969 Monday-Friday at 11:30am-12Noon on CBS-TV Daytime.moreless
  • 125
    Rawhide

    Rawhide

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    CBS (ended 1966)
    Rawhide is the continuing saga of a group of Texans taking a 3000 head herd of cattle north to market.
  • 126
    Hawaiian Eye

    Hawaiian Eye

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    ABC (ended 1963)
    Hawaiian Eye is about a couple of private detectives based in the exotic Hawaiian Islands. This was the first and most successful 77 Sunset Strip clone. One could even make it a case of calling it a spin-off series since Strip detective Stuart Bailey appeared in the very first episode. Also, Tom Lopaka and Tracy Steele would visit the Strip on occasion. The WB Private Eye universe was later completed by Surfside Six and Bourbon Street Beat.moreless
  • 127
    The Hollywood Palace

    The Hollywood Palace

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    Welcome to The Hollywood Palace guide at tv.com.
    The Hollywood Palace was an hour-long variety show that ran on the ABC-TV network from January 4, 1964 to February 7, 1970. Instead of a permanent host, guest hosts were used. Bing Crosby, a frequent guest host, hosted the first and last Hollywood Palace shows. Four of Bing's Christmas specials, featuring his wife Kathryn and their 3 children, were actually Hollywood Palace shows.
    The Hollywood Palace was a mid-season replacement for "The Jerry Lewis Show." ABC originally had high hopes for Lewis' live, two-hour variety series. They signed the comedian to a 5-year contract for a reported $35 million. The network also purchased the El Capitan Theater in Los Angeles and re-christened it "The Jerry Lewis Theater." "The Jerry Lewis Show" premiered on September 21, 1963, but by Thanksgiving 1963 it was apparent that the show was a failure. ABC decided to replace it with a variety show. The network hired Nick Vanoff to produce the new show. Vanoff, in turn, hired William O. Harbach and Otto Harback to help him develop the series. They hurriedly came up with the concept of Hollywood Palace.

    The final "Jerry Lewis Show" aired on December 21, 1963, and The Hollywood Palace premiered on January 4, 1964. (ABC aired a special on 12/28/63.) The Hollywood Palace took over the first hour of Lewis' old time slot. The second hour was given to the local affiliates for their own local and syndicated programming. The old "El Capitan Theater" was once again re-named, this time as "The Hollywood Palace."

    The Hollywood Palace resembled a Vaudeville show. Raquel Welch, who was just a few years away from international stardom, was a regular on the 1964 shows. Welch appeared as the "billboard girl," who changed the large cards that introduced the guests. The first 2 seasons of The Hollywood Palace were in black and white.

    The Hollywood Palace switched to color at the start of its third season. The first color episode was broadcast on September 18, 1965. The "Hollywood Palace" theater became ABC's first color videotape studio. It was also the home of "The Lawrence Welk Show," which switched to color in the same month.

    Collectors of this series may notice that black and white copies of the color episodes are available on VHS. These copies were mastered from B&W 16mm kinescopes. (Kinescopes were a videotape-to-film transfer produced by aiming a 16mm film camera at a TV monitor.) The original color videotapes do exist but they are not as accessible as the b/w kinescopes. These 16mm kinescopes were originally used by local U.S. stations and by the AFRTS. In the 1960's, many local stations in smaller markets carried more than one network. And often it was the ABC programs that were bumped to other time slots. Instead of purchasing the then-expensive video tape recorders for time-shifting purposes, the stations opted to use 16mm kinescopes provided by the network. Kinescopes were also used by the AFRTS which operates TV stations on overseas military bases. The AFRTS prints usually do not have the original network commercials.
    Thanks to everyone who's helped on this guide, including:
    -- Gary Belich - gary558@yahoo.com
    -- Ben Chaput - editor of the RVSP (Rock Video 60s Project) website and the RVSP Message Board
    The Hollywood Palace Broadcast days/times Seasons 1 through 4 - Saturdays 9:30pm Eastern Season 5 (1967-68) Tuesdays 10:00pm Eastern (through 2-Jan-68) Season 5 - Saturdays 9:30pm Eastern (13-Jan-68 through end of season) Seasons 6 & 7 - Saturdays 9:30pm Easternmoreless
  • 128
    The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson

    The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson

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    NBC (ended 1992)
    Six months after Jack Paar made a stormy departure from "The Tonight Show" (over jokes about Communism, among other issues) and viewers enduring a succession of "substitute" hosts (and an ill-fated attempt at a magazine-type show), NBC (and middle America) finally got the comedian they were waiting for. Johnny Carson – who had honed his craft on radio and daytime television, and to that point was best known as host of Who Do You Trust – made his debut as host of "The Tonight Show" on October 1, 1962. Thus began a love affair with America that lasted 30 years, not only making Carson wealthy and powerful, but earning him the title, "King of Late Night." It started out shaky. NBC built Carson a cheap set on the sixth floor of 30 Rockefeller Center, not thinking the show would last. Ed McMahon was less confident; he still lived in Philadelphia and commuted for the next three years. In 1962, "Tonight" began at 11:15 pm ET and lasted 105 minutes. By then, most NBC affiliates had inflated their late-evening newscasts to half an hour. It meant that, unless viewers tuned in on the NBC owned-and-operated stations in New York, Washington, DC, Chicago, Philadelphia, or Los Angeles, chances are they missed Carson's monologue. NBC quickly moved the start time of Johnny's show to 11:30 pm ET to ensure everyone could see the best part of his domain. In 1972, the show moved from New York to NBC's West Coast headquarters, thus setting up countless gags about "beautiful downtown Burbank." For a number of years, NBC reran "Tonight" on weekends at 11:30 pm ET. These reruns, of course, didn't score nearly the ratings as the originals maintained. By the end of 1974, Carson told NBC to turn their late weekends to another program. NBC hired a young Canadian performer and writer named Lorne Michaels to develop (what would quickly become) the "Tonight" antithesis -- Saturday Night Live. Carson became the man with whom millions of Americans ended their day with a relatively simple formula: an opening monologue of topical (sometimes corny) humor. Johnny's stock in trade became his down-home, glib sense of humor and his natural wit. He possessed the knack of being equal parts L.A. hip and Midwest backward. However, he never mocked people or resorted to mean-spirited or cheap, off-color jokes; instead, he often poked fun at human nature and events of the day in such a way that made America know it was OK to laugh at themselves. The Carson Monologue became "must see TV," and to miss a night was leave one's self less than "in the know" at the water cooler the following day. On one occasion, a Carson joke about toilet paper shortage actually led to hoarding of the product by thousands of consumers. Following the monologue, viewers saw either a "desk bit" between Carson and McMahon, or a more elaborate, produced skit. Then, interviews and performances by a wide range of celebrities followed (some reports have Johnny's guest list at more than 20,000). Carson was often at his best while interviewing the "everyday" person, especially young children. Some of the notable skits and features: • Carnac the Magnificent – Debuting in 1964, Carson (wearing a jeweled and feathered turban) would "divine" answers to questions from "hermetically sealed" envelopes, a standard gag from Vaudeville. Example: "The answer is...Chicken teriyaki! The question..."What is the name of the last surviving Japanese kamikaze pilot?" • The Mighty Carson Art Players – Starting in 1967, this catch-all title featured parodies of movies, TV shows and commercials. Classic skits included a tongue-twisting take-off on Dragnet (1968, with Jack Webb); commercial parodies of E.F. Hutton (with a deceased Carson rising from a casket to "my broker is E.F. Hutton..."), American Express (with Carson as Karl Malden), Energizer Batteries (Carson as Robert Conrad), and various diarrhea commercial take-offs. Also under the "Mighty Carson" umbrella was the Tea Time Movie sketch, with Carson playing Art Fern, an oily afternoon movie host and commercial huckster. These sketches were full of double entendre humor, first featuring busty Carol Wayne as the straight foil, "the Matinee Lady." Following Wayne's drowning death in 1985, Teresa Ganzel was added. Other classic moments included Carson as President Reagan (and actor Fred Holliday) in a hilarious "Who's On First?"-style routine, and a duet with Julio Iglesias ("To All The Girls I've Loved Before"), with Carson giving a convincing Willie Nelson impersonation. • Floyd R. Turbo – The super-patriot who gave over-the-top editorials. Other memorable moments: • Falsetto-singer and ukulele player Tiny Tim on-air marriage to Miss Vicki (Vicki Budinger) on December 17, 1969. • Ed Ames infamous tomahawk throw demo, striking the outlined target squarely in the crotch. • The marmoset who relieved itself while poking around at Carson's head; plus other animals (brought on by frequent guests Joan Embery and Jim Fowler) who refused to behave or were just being themselves. • Potato chip collector Myrtle Young, who momentarily thinks Johnny has eaten one of her prized chips. Among the performers who owe (at least part) of the beginning of their careers to Carson: Joan Rivers, Roseanne Barr, Drew Carey, Jay Leno, David Letterman, Eddie Murphy, Jerry Seinfeld and Garry Shandling, plus many others. Ironically, Letterman (a frequent "Tonight" guest host in the late 1970's) was Carson's first choice as his successor. Leno, however, had already been given the seat as "permanent guest host," following Carson's professional breakup with Joan Rivers (who had joined the up and coming FOX Network to do her own late night show in 1986.) Leno, though seen by some at NBC as "too ethnic looking," had the favor of NBC's West Coast executives, and was chosen over Letterman, whom NBC West saw as "too cranky and edgy" to replace the mild-mannered Carson. This was perceived as a final snub to Carson, and prompted Letterman to defect to CBS, and compete head to head against the show he'd always wanted to host. The entire "Tonight" endgame saga would be the subject of Bill Carter's book The Late Shift: Letterman, Leno & the Network Battle for the Night (later turned into an HBO film, with Rich Little as Johnny). Carson's 30-year ride was hardly without its more tenuous moments, thanks to several contract disputes and his well-publicized failed marriages (he was thrice divorced during his run on the show). Carson's "alimony payment" jokes would become a staple of the show. Following much protracted negotiation (including talk of his leaving "Tonight"), Carson signed a new contract with NBC in 1980. Three stipulations in the deal: 1) "Tonight" was reduced from 90 minutes to 60; 2) Carson would dictate what kind of show NBC could run at 12:30 am ET. This meant replacing Tom Snyder's Tomorrow show with from Carson's stable. 3) Carson Productions was formed. Among its most heralded works was the show that followed "Tonight" -- Late Night with David Letterman. Carson Productions' other gift to NBC was a series of specials called Television's Greatest Commercials, hosted by Ed McMahon. McMahon was also a victim of a one-shot deal called Johnny Carson's Greatest Practical Jokes, in which Johnny had loaded the trunk of Ed's car with office equipment and taped Ed failing to get past NBC Security (and a guard named Carson). Both of these specials would merge with Dick Clark's running TV Censored Bloopers in January 1984, becoming TV's Bloopers & Practical Jokes. In 1983, Carson Productions produced and distributed "Carson's Comedy Classics," a somewhat low-budget, 30 minute repackaging of "Tonight" clips, culled mainly from the years 1972-1982. Carson's lock on late night came into question in the late 1980's, likely precipitated by two events: the debut of The Arsenio Hall Show in 1989, and Dana Carvey doing a less-than-loving portrayal (with Phil Hartman as a one-note Ed McMahon) of Carson on Saturday Night Live. Carvey's "Johnny" was basically a dinosaur -- a relic clueless of pop culture and mired in "unhipness." In one of the more scathing takes, Carvey presented Carson as "Carsenio," giving his Johnny a wedge cut and Arsenio-styled suit. These less-than-flattening portrayals of Carson on SNL were seen by some as NBC giving tacit approval to the move to push Johnny out. Carson, during his last show, in thanking Doc and the band, would lament TV's loss of the "last big swing band," saying, "To say that this band is not 'hip' is to not know the meaning of the word." In 1991, as Carson was starting his 29th year, the "King of Late Night" announced in his usual no-big-deal style that he was retiring, expressing a desire to leave the show while still in his prime. His second-to-last show on May 21, 1992 featured just two guests: Robin Williams and Bette Midler, with Midler serenading Carson with "One for My Baby," a teary-eyed Carson taking in the moment. The final show on May 22, 1992 was a quiet and contemplative retrospective, featuring "a day in the life" on the Tonight Show set, and a tribute to his late son, Rick (who was killed in a car crash the previous June). Alone on a stool, in front of the familiar curtain, a tearful Carson bade his audience "a heartfelt good night," thus ending not only a show, but an era of television. With very few exceptions, Carson's "Tonight" departure was the last most people saw of their beloved late-night TV comic. Most notably: a voice appearance as himself on The Simpsons episode, 'Krusty Gets Kancelled,' and a pair of appearances on Late Show with David Letterman. Just prior to Carson's death, it was revealed that Johnny would occasionally give Dave an idea or two for his monologue, thus cementing the notion that Carson saw Letterman as his true late night heir. When Johnny Carson died on January 23, 2005, America mourned the passing of a late-night legend. Jay Leno devoted his January 24, 2005 show to his predecessor (though it should be noted, Leno read a prepared "tribute" from cue cards). On the show were Ed McMahon, Drew Carey and Carson's close friends Bob Newhart and Don Rickles, all providing their remembrances. Letterman's first new show following Carson's death featured longtime "Tonight" executive producer Peter Lassally and a performance of "Here's That Rainy Day" -- one of Johnny's favorites -- by bandleader Doc Severinsen, with NBC Orchestra mates Tommy Newsom and Ed Shaughnessy. Thanks to TV Tome contributors Brian Rathjen & doppelgänger.moreless
  • 129
    Love, American Style

    Love, American Style

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    Love, American Style entertained viewers with stories about common people finding love in all walks of life. In this anthology series, each hour-long broadcast consisted of a group of vignettes, aired sequentially and separately and each with an introductory title card. Normally there were three or four vignettes to a show, although occasionally there were as few as one or as many as five. Short blackout skits would be shown in between segments whenever time allowed. The skits featured a recurring cast of players which included James Hampton, best known as Hannibal Dobbs from F Troop, and veteran character actor Stuart Margolin, brother of executive producer Arnold Margolin. The syndication rerun package consisted of 30-minute broadcasts that were edited from the original hour-long broadcasts, except for those which aired in the first half of season 2, which ran in a 30-minute time slot. The show never ranked above #25 in the Nielsen Ratings. Time slots that Love, American Style originally aired in: September 29, 1969 to January 12, 1970: Mondays, 10:00 to 11:00. January 23, 1970 to September 18, 1970: Fridays, 10:00 to 11:00. September 25, 1970 to January 15, 1971: Fridays, 9:30 to 10:00. January 22, 1971 to January 11, 1974: Fridays 10:00 to 11:00. In 1970, the show received a Golden Globe nomination for Best TV Show in a Musical or Comedy. It also won two Emmys for Charles Fox's musical compositions and was nominated for two more. The theme song was originally sung by the pop group, the Cowsills, but later replaced by an uptempo version, credited to the "Love American Style Singers." There was a short-lived revival in 1986 called The New Love, American Style, which aired on ABC's daytime schedule. One of the segments, "Love and the Happy Days," spawned a successful spin-off series, Happy Days.moreless
  • 130
    The Jetsons

    The Jetsons

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    ABC (ended 1987)
    With the success of The Flintstones, the modern Stone Age family, Hanna-Barbera decided to make a similar family cartoon, but set in their vision of the Space Age in the 21st century. This new series that debuted September 23, 1962 became The Jetsons. Set mainly in sky-high Orbit City, the show featured the family of George Jetson, Jane, his wife, their daughter Judy, and son Elroy living the average life in the future with flying space cars, instant transport tubes, and various robots and gadgets than can get their work done for them in a matter of seconds.

    George brought in the family income by working at Spacely Space Sprockets, run by his stocky, ill-tempered boss Cosmo Spacely, who's usually quick to fire George for any reason he could find. But somehow, he always managed to get his job back and continue supporting his family. He works as an indexer and is teamed with his helpful computer R.U.D.I. Other than the threats of firing by Spacely, George would also have to worry about any schemes carried out by Mr. Spacely's top business rival W.C. Cogswell, owner and president of Cogswell Cogs. If there's a dispute between the two businessmen, it's almost certain George would wind up in the middle of it. Most times, though, things always worked out in the end.

    Jane is the housewife who tends to the home, but loves to shop for the latest fashions and various items that can be a help to the family, like new gadgets that can help them in new ways. She's assisted by the family's robot maid Rosey (which can also be spelled Rosie). She's one of the older-fashioned models compared to most of the advanced robot maids of the future, but the Jetsons love her and regard her as a member of the family.

    Judy is the Jetsons' teenage daughter who attends Orbit High School and goes for the latest teen fashions, trends, and music, and seems to have a different boyfriend in most episodes. If she's lucky, she can even wind up dating a celebrity, like her favorite rock star Jet Screamer, much to her father's chagrin.

    Elroy is the Jetsons' genius son who attends Little Dipper Elementary School and is a straight-A student. He's a part-time inventor and can make new creations in hope to make a better future, and if fortunate, a little money on the side. But most times, he likes to be an average boy by playing various sports, and with his faithful companion, the family's dog Astro, who at times is overly affectionate, and can annoy George at times. But like Rosey, he's regarded as a member of the family.

    The Jetsons reside at the Skypad Apartments, which are properly cared for by superintendant Henry Orbit, who like Elroy is a mechanical genius. At times, he can invent gadgets that can help him with his maintenance work. His greatest accomplishment is his robot assistant Mac, who can get his work at the Skypad Apartments done in half the time. But he does have feelings for Rosey as the two are occasionally seen as a couple, but are mainly friends.

    Other recurring characters in this series include Mr. Spacely's family, particularly his wife Stella (sometimes called Petunia, likely her nickname), one of few people who can actually put a scare in him if he rubs her the wrong way. And they have a young son close to Elroy's age named Arthur. Common characters at Spacely Sprockets are Uniblab, an underling robot who at times is a stool pigeon for Mr. Spacely to George's dismay, as well as Spacely's secretary Miss Galaxy. Cogswell also had a few subordinates of his own. Among them were his assistant Harlan and his scientist Moonstone.

    The Jetsons ran for only one season on ABC, but the series was more successful in syndication. This led to a revival in 1985 with new episodes with more advanced animation that was richer in color and made the series even more futuristic than the 1960's version of the 21st century. New characters were introduced as well, including a new alien gremlin pet for the Jetsons, named Orbitty, who has springlike legs and suction cup feet, enabling him to hang upside down. He could also tinker with machines and change color in accordance to emotion. Another new animal for the revival was a robot dog for Cogwell named Sentro, who served as a guard dog and a spy often used against Mr. Spacely in efforts to beat him to the punch on his latest projects.

    These episodes aired in syndication, which generated the same level of success as the originals when they went in that direction. This led to 10 more episodes to finalize the series in 1987, as well as two TV movies, the music-themed Rockin' with Judy Jetson, which was preceded by the epic crossover The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones, which brought the Space Age and the Stone Age together as Hanna-Barbera's most famous families had a grand adventure spanning two eras. The Jetsons had its true finale when Jetsons: The Movie hit the theaters in 1990, as this would be among the last voice work for actors George O'Hanlon (George Jetson) and Mel Blanc (Mr. Spacely) for they both had died just prior to the movie's release.

    Overall, The Jetsons may not have had the supreme popularity of The Flintstones, but it did have a wide appeal for families of any generation and certainly had a place in the heart for those who would turn on and watch the series.

    The Jetsons, like many Hanna-Barbera series, can be seen on Boomerang from Cartoon Network. Check your local listings. And the majority of the series can be seen on DVD, so it would be a good means to build your cartoon collection.moreless
  • 131
    Super Bowl

    Super Bowl

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    CBS
    The Super Bowl is the biggest football game of the year. Each year since 1967 two teams battle it out on the gridiron for the NFL's most prized possession, the Lombardi Trophy, which was named after legendary Green Bay coach Vince Lombardi, the winner of the first two Super Bowls.

    The Pittsburgh Steelers hold the record for most Super Bowl victories with six. The Dallas Cowboys have the most appearances in The Super Bowl with eight.

    Four teams have never made it to the Super Bowl; they are the Detroit Lions, Cleveland Browns, Jacksonville Jaguars, and Houston Texans.moreless
  • 132
    Laredo

    Laredo

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    NBC (ended 1967)
    Welcome to the Laredo guide at TV.com. Laredo combined action with humor to tell the tales of three Company B Texas Rangers. Reese Bennett is older then his two partners, Chad Cooper and Joe Riley. Reese is in his forties and was previously a Union Army Officer. Chad was in the Border Patrol during the Civil War but is originally from New Orleans. He joined the Rangers to search for the gunrunners who helped ambush fellow border patrolmen. Joe was a gunfighter who was at times on the wrong side of the law and joined the rangers as protection from a sheriff or two. Chad and Joe love to tease Reese about his age. They had a Gunga Din like camaraderie. They are lead by Captain Parmalee who was stern and disciplined. He would send them on their missions and many times was not amused by the shenanigans they got into. Erik Hunter joined them in the second season. Veteran actor Claude Akins played Ranger Cotton Buckmeister in 5 different episodes but never officially became part of the cast. The pilot, "We've Lost A Train", appeared as an episode of The Virginian in April of 1965. Reese's horse Cactus was mentioned in several episodes. Chad's horse was Amigo, which was Peter Brown's own horse in real life.moreless
  • 133
    Another World

    Another World

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    NBC (ended 1999)
    For thirty-five years, Another World was a much loved part of the NBC daytime lineup. Fans followed the Frame, Cory, Hudson, and many other families through trial and tribulation, pain and pleasure. Another World was the first soap to expand to an hour (then 90 minutes from March 1979-August 1980). It also was the first soap to have spin-offs (Somerset and Texas). In April of 1999, the parent company and network made a decision not to continue the program, and the show aired it's final episode in June of 1999. Although gone from the airwaves, the show will live on in the hearts of the fans. "We do not live in this world alone, but in a thousand other worlds." Created By: Irna Phillips with William J. Bell First Broadcast: May 4, 1964 Last Broadcast: June 25, 1999 Program Type: Soap Opera Production Company: Procter and Gamble Productions Broadcast History: 3:00pm - 3:30pm (5/4/64-1/3/75) 3:00pm - 4:00pm (1/6/75-3/2/79) 2:30pm - 4:00pm (3/5/79-8/1/80) 2:00pm - 3:00pm (8/4/80-6/25/99) Television Episodes: 8891 B&W; Color Episodes Spin-offs: Texas (1980-1982); Somerset (1970-1976)moreless
  • 134
    The Time Tunnel

    The Time Tunnel

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    ABC (ended 1967)
    "Two American scientists are lost in the swirling maze of past and future ages, during the first experiments on America's greatest and most secret project, the Time Tunnel. Tony Newman and Doug Phillips now tumble helplessly toward a new fantastic adventure, somewhere along the infinite corridors of time. This one-season show, produced by Irwin Allen, chronicled the adventures of two scientists, Dr. Tony Newman and Dr. Douglas Phillips. Both are working on Project TicToc, a government operation to perfect time travel. In the first episode, the impetuous Tony jumps through the untested portal and finds himself on the Titanic. Doug goes after him, and although they manage to escape before the ship goes down, the folks back home are never quite able to retrieve them. So in each week's episode the two travellers are whisked from one setting to another (sometimes several times in the same episode) and have to survive pirates, Roman soldiers, battlefields, and the occasional invading silver-skinned alien, all while hoping the folks back at the Project find a way to get them back for good.moreless
  • 135
    The Match Game

    The Match Game

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    NBC (ended 1969)
    You mean there was a Match Game back in the 1960s? Yes sure was. But this original incarnation of what became one of the most popular wild game shows ever was a quite different creature to say the least. Y'see, this version of The MATCH GamE employed a staid but reliable format that earned the show a 7-season run and guaranteed host of The MATCH GamE Gene Rayburn a permanent place in game show history. Debuting Monday December 31, 1962 on NBC-TV "In Living Color", The MATCH GamE pitted 2 teams of 3 players each (2 contestants each paired with a star team captain for a total of 6 contestants). Rayburn posed a simple question (e.g., "Name a green vegetable" or "To a rich man, ($)_______ dollars is nothing."). Each team member without consulting the others writes his/her response on an index card with a crayon. Rayburn then calls for each player's answer, one at a time. The teams earn points for each correct answer as thus: * Two players match: (10 points from December 31, 1962 to April 5, 1963) 25 points (April 8, 1963-September 26, 1969). * All three players match: (20 points) 50 points. Play alternates between the 2 teams until 1 scores 100 points or greater than that win. The winning contestants shared $100+ and to go on to play The Audience Match. In The Audience Match, the team tried to predict the Secret No. 1 answer of a 100-member polling group (usually, a previous studio audience, but it could also other groups such as women or college students and in 1964 The Number of People that totaled 100 of less than that). The questions are like before and each player tried to guess the "Best Answer" to match. Rewards were paid thusly: * One correct match: $50. * Two correct matches: $100. * All three right matches: $150. The highest possible payout was $450 making the game's possible maximum winnings $550+. The teams play the game again with the new game. Starting on March 27-31, 1967, The Telephone Match was added, where a home viewer was called and asked to match his answer to a question with the answer from a pre-selected audience member by a number up to 100-plus audience members. The two players share a growing cash jackpot for matching answers – $500 plus(+) $100 per day until it's an correct match. The MATCH GamE cancelled its long 7-Season run on Friday September 26, 1969 on NBC-TV along with Bob Stewart's "Eye Guess" & "Personality" & Ralph Andrews' "You Don't Say" and but don't expect to see very many episodes on GSN (the old Game Show Network). Thanks to NBC's practice of reusing videotapes to record shows (and since The MATCH GamE was aired live in the beginning) only 11 episodes - all but a couple black and white kinescopes from 1963-1965 - are known to exist. A color video studio master from 1969 also is rumored to be around but has not been rerun. As we all know, The MATCH GamE returned nearly 4 years later in 1973 on CBS-TV in what would become a much funnier contest called Match Game 73. That's not to say there were plenty of funny, classic moments on this 1st Edition. A note on the episode guide: since the show ran Monday-Friday of each week, and the guests were the same for all 5 days, each episode listed is actually a week's worth of episodes (1760 in all). The MATCH GamE is "A Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Production" in association with the NBC-TV Network. The Broadcast Report of The MATCH GamE: December 31, 1962-September 26, 1969, NBC-TV Monday-Friday at 4:00-4:25 p.m. in Living Color. *The 1st theme song was "A Swingin' Safari" written by Bert Kaempfert from December 31, 1962 to September 1, 1967. *The 2nd theme song called "The MATCH GamE" (along with the same beat of "Fashion in Sewing" is The Theme of "Everybody's Talking" A 1967 ABC-TV Game Show starring (The Late) Lloyd Thaxton) performed by The Score Production Band from September 4, 1967 to September 26, 1969. In the later version of The MATCH GAME (1979-1982) they also had a portion of the show were if they had time left they would play a game with the audience. The question was read and the panelist one panelist would write an answer and the person in the audience would guess and if they got it write they would get $50.moreless
  • 136
    Homicide

    Homicide

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    Seven Network (ended 1977)
    Homicide was Australia's first major drama series, and the most influential by any measure. Based around murder cases investigated by the Homicide squad at Melbourne's Russell Street police headquarters, Homicide single-handedly established a viable TV drama industry in Australia. Over 11 years and 510 episodes, Homicide acheived massive ratings (peaking at an incredible 54 at one point), made household names of its stars, spawned two sister series- Division 4 and Matlock Police- on rival networks, and still outlived them both! In the twenty-two years since it was last broadcast (in afternoon re-runs), the series has become renowned for its frequent car chases, slightly shonky 1970's fashions, and occasionally stilted dialogue. Some of Australia's best-known actors, writers, and directors got their start on Homicide, and without it- and the successors it generated- Australian drama would be very, very different.moreless
  • 137
    National Geographic Channel Specials

    National Geographic Channel Specials

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    CBS
    A series of documentary specials that covers a diverse number of subjects including the natural world of wild creatures, native cultures, historical discoveries, etc. The specials range from a Nazi Expedition to Monkey Hunters, all the way to the Penguin Death Zone, and exploring the Year of the Hamster.

    The NGC specials is a collection of educational documentaries presented by the National Geographic Society that first began it's telecast on CBS Primetime Specials from 1964 until 1973. From 1973 to 1975, it was on ABC Primetime Specials. PBS began telecasting the NGC specials at various times between 1975 to 1985. In 1985 and onwards, the programmes were telecast on various cable networks including the National Geographic Channel.moreless
  • 138
    The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau

    The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau

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    (ended 1976)
    Broadcasting into millions of homes around the world from 1966 to 1976, The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau chronicles the exotic undersea explorations of Jacques-Yves Cousteau and his crew aboard the ex-Royal Navy minesweepe, The Calypso.moreless
  • 139
    The Ruff & Reddy Show

    The Ruff & Reddy Show

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    NBC (ended 1964)
    The Ruff & Reddy Show was Hanna-Barbera's first cartoon series which featured a cat (Ruff) and dog (Reddy) in serialized adventures, with thirteen episodes comprising a story arc. Ruff, was voiced by Don Messick, and Reddy was voiced by Daws Butler.

    Hanna and Barbera opened their cartoon studio the same year MGM (the studio they worked for) closed down its cartoon studio. After much effort, they were able to sell Ruff & Reddy to NBC, but they were only able to get $2700 per half hour of cartoon show, so all the meticulous detail into making the Tom and Jerry shorts were eschewed for a production-line process. Bill and Joe, taking a cue from 1949's "Crusader Rabbit," reasoned the best way to offset the low production values was to create appealing heroes and captivating storylines. Ruff and Reddy made their way through clandestine escapades squaring off against villains like Scarey Harry Safari, Killer and Diller, and Captain Greedy and Salt Water Daffy. Assisting our heroes in several adventures was wacky scientist Professor Gizmo.

    The show was first aired on NBC in December 1957 as part of live action host segments. Jimmy Blaine was the host on the show's first run (1957-60), and Captain Bob Cottle replaced him in the second run (1962-64). When the show went into syndication, the opening titles, which were never shown on the NBC telecasts, were seen with the "H-B Enterprises" card. The theme song was also heard for the first time:

    Get set, get ready Here comes Ruff and Reddy They're tough but steady Always rough and ready

    They sometimes have their little spats Even fight like dogs and cats But when they need each other That's when they're Ruff and Reddy Ruff & Reddy episodes appeared on Family Channel's "Incredible Animals" cartoon show in 1992 and recently the series has aired on Cartoon Network and its sister channel Boomerang.moreless
  • 140
    Blue Peter

    Blue Peter

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    BBC
    Blue Peter is the longest running British childrens television show, celebrating it's fiftieth birthday in October 2008. The show airs as part of the CBBC strand of programming on BBC One on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 4.35pm. It is currently in it's 52nd series. The show began on October 16th 1958, and since then has gone through a cycle of 31 presenters, with Andy Akinwolere, Helen Skelton and Joel Defries currently presenting. The name Blue Peter comes from the blue and white flag which hoists a ship in port when it's getting ready to sail. The logo for the show is a blue and white boat designed by Tony Hart. Blue Peter badges are worn by presenters and different variations of the badge are awarded to both viewers and celebrity guests. The theme tune to the show is a take on the sea shanty Barnacle Bill and was originally composed by Ashworth Hope and has since been re-recorded ten times, the current version is orchestrated by Murray Gold. Throughout it's first series it ran for 15 minutes on Monday nights. From the 1960s until 1995, the show ran twice a week on Mondays and Thursdays, at 4.35pm until the mid 1970s, when it moved to 5.10pm. Throughout 1995 until 2001, three shows aired, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, in 2002 the show moved to 5pm and in 2007 remaining in the same time slot, shows aired on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. From September 2007, the show began airing twice a week and from February 2008 moved to it's current slot Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 4.35pm. The show has many features and traditions that it carry's from series to series. The show always features 'Blue Peter Pets', Petra the dog been the first. Their's been five dogs, seven cats, four tortoises and a parrot that have all appeared, before the current line up of two dogs - Mabel & Lucy, two cats - Socks & Cookie and a tortoise, Shelley. Another regular feature on the show is the 'Blue Peter Garden', based in the BBC Television Centre were Blue Peter is filmed, alot of features are based in the garden, so their's need for a regular Blue Peter gardener, Percy Thrower (who also originally designed the garden), Chris Crowder and Clare Bradley have all had the job, before Chris Collins took it on. The show has also made an appeal every year since the show began, these range from bring and buy sales been organised and endorsed by Blue Peter or to the more recent, Mission Nutrition campaign, helping kids eat better here and abroad.moreless
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