• 181
    Prisoner: Cell Block H

    Prisoner: Cell Block H

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    Network Ten (ended 1986)
    Prisoner (Prisoner: Cell Block H in the United Kingdom) is a long running Australian soap about the inmates at the fictional women's prison Wentworth Detention Centre. The show ran from 1979 to 1986, with 692 episodes being made in total.moreless
  • 182
    The Persuaders!

    The Persuaders!

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    ITV (ended 1972)
    Welcome to The Persuaders! guide at TV.com. Lord Brett Sinclair and Danny Wilde, two wealthy playboys from very different backgrounds, are paired up by a judge who tasks them with becoming international crimestoppers. The Persuaders! was a Television Reporters International Tribune production for ITC.moreless
  • 183
    The Two Ronnies

    The Two Ronnies

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    BBC (ended 1986)
    A show which gripped the funnybones of the UK for years, and which has also proved a big hit across the seas. Starring ever shrinking Ronnie Corbett, who recently admitted sex manuals have helped his love life (he stands on them) and Ronnie Barker, owner of the Guinness world record for least number of people fitted into a telephone booth. According to legend, the duo were presenting the BAFTAS and a technical hitch occurred. They covered so well that producers offered them their own show. In 1971, they signed contracts with the BBC to record a series of shows called The Two Ronnies.moreless
  • 184
    Second City TV

    Second City TV

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    Global (ended 1981)
    Welcome to the Second City TV guide at TV.com. One of the most popular and ever-growing comedy troupes of all time is the repertory theatre group The Second City. With humble beginnings in Chicago December 16, 1959, it soon grew popular enough that Second City company No. 2 began in Toronto in 1973. After a shaky start, Toronto's Second City settled in The Old Firehall, rumored to have a haunted belfry. With new comedic talents such as Dan Aykroyd and Gilda Radner filling the Toronto stage in its first two years, a television series seemed in order. However, the scant budget wouldn't allow it, until former alumnus David Steinberg offered some of those performing in 1974-76 roles on his show (which was also a show-within-a-show). The David Steinberg Show flopped, but the co-stars now had the budget, thanks to Steinberg's pay, to attempt a series. So, with the exception of Martin Short (who joined the show in 1982) and the addition of theatre performers Harold Ramis and Catherine O'Hara, they began the shoestring project Second City TV on Global. SCTV, as the station and the series would come to be known, was a television station in the small town of Melonville. At the heart of its off-center programming was owner-president Guy Caballero. Joe Flaherty created Caballero, first as a voice and then as a white-clothed conniver riding a wheelchair. Caballero could walk, but he rode the wheelchair for respect. Moe Green, played by Ramis, was the initial station manager. He was known for purposely taking advantage of and frustrating people on the air. Most of SCTV's programs were written by, directed by and produced by the money-grubbing snob Johnny LaRue, played by legendary comedian John Candy. He would be known for using crane shots at the end of his shows. What SCTV aired was a biting satire of everything on the tube. For example, Flaherty also played the Carsonesque Sammy Maudlin, a heavy-smoking talk show host with a curly Afro and bad singing voice, worshiped by announcer William B. Williams (Candy), who let Maudlin's every insult bounce off him. One of Maudlin's most frequent guests was Bobby Bittman, played by Eugene Levy, an unfunny stand-up comedian with helmet hair, gold chains, and the annoying catch-phrase "How are ya?" Flaherty and Levy also played newscasters Floyd Robertson and Earl Camembert respectively. Floyd and Earl were, along with Green and LaRue, among SCTV's first recurring characters. Robertson was an experienced, competent reporter with a shady secret life (he was an alcoholic and womanizer), and was always getting the interesting stories. Neurotic, bumbling Camembert was always getting flimsy pieces of trivia no-one cared about. Robertson was also Count Floyd, the host of Monster Chiller Horror Theatre, which showcased awful films going for terror. "Ooh, scary, eh, kids?" Many of these films were works of 3-D by having the actors thrust some ordinary object to the camera lens and retreat it. These flicks usually starred the evil Dr. Tongue (Candy) and his hunchbacked assistant, Woody (Levy). O'Hara, like Ramis, only played one serious recurring character, obnoxious, sleazy singer Lola Heatherton, with her own catch-line: "I want to bear your children!" But she also perfected impersonations of celebrities such as Katherine Hepburn. Other characters evolved as SCTV bounced around through eight years and four networks. Who could forget porn dealer Harry, the guy with the snake on his face (Candy)? Or Tommy Shanks (Candy), twice elected mayor of Melonville? The show also included Dave Thomas's pre-era Jerry Springer incarnation, Bill Needle), whose mailbox show was constantly being retitled. Andrea Martin, who was the least prolific writer among the cast, brought to SCTV Pirini Scleroso, the cleaning lady who believed repeating people was the way to carry a conversation. From what anyone could guess, Pirini was an emigrant from Leutonia, as were the Schmenge brothers (Levy and Candy), a polka group who make every song sound the same. Other greats of SCTV were the unscripted Great White North, aka Kanadian Korner, a public-affairs short featuring the show's most-remembered characters, Bob McKenzie (Rick Moranis) and his brother Doug (Thomas). Just as unstructured was the kids show "Mrs Falbo's Tiny Town" with clueless Falbo (Martin) and neurotic Mr Messenger (Candy). The list goes on. Going into its second season, Harold Ramis was planning to write movies in Hollywood (he had already co-written National Lampoon's Animal House). Thus Ramis and four others rented a summer house in Bel Air, California, where they scripted sixteen shows for SCTV's second season. In the second season, Moe Green was kidnapped by the Leutonian Liberation Front, who held him for an unpaid ransom. (While Ramis remained head writer on the season, he no longer appeared in sketches.) He was replaced as station manager by Edith Prickley (played by Andrea Martin), a nasal-voiced, leopard skin-clad, wise-cracking woman who aggravated the staff to no end. Guy Caballero was shown in person for the first time and was noted for frequently addressing his TV audience. SCTV was also known for it's incredible impressions. One of the most popular recurring ones was Dick Cavett, done by Moranis, who also did Woody Allen. Allen worshiped Bob Hope, done by Thomas. The Three Stooges were parodied as the Three Dummies, with Eugene Levy as Moe, Joe Flaherty as Larry, and John Candy as Curly. There was the famous Orson Welles impression, done by Candy, Kirk Douglas; done by Flaherty; Charo, done by Martin; and various others. There would occasionally be a real celebrity playing themselves, although always as much of a celebrity as the budget would afford. Needless to say, it wasn't the guest list that was the show's appeal, but the dazzling talent of its stars. However, it was cancelled by Global after two seasons. Fortunately, CBC picked it up the next year. Andrew Alexander, one of SCTV's executive producers, moved production from Toronto to Edmonton, fast becoming a hockey power in the NHL. SCTV was forced to adjust to both the new studios and the lack of John Candy and Catherine O'Hara, both of whom were doing other projects. For the Edmonton season, Moranis became a regular, as did two new writers, Tony Rosato and Robin Duke. It was during this third season that SCTV introduced Bob and Doug McKenzie in their Great White North program (originally done as filler for the slightly-longer Canadian version of SCTV). Both Rosato and Duke also established characters (chef Marcello Sebastian and Crazy Crafts host Molly Earle, respectively). This is the SCTV series most are familiar with, it being the longest running. In the spring of 1981, with NBC needing to reload its late-night lineup, senior VP of programming Irv Wilson cut a deal to bring SCTV to the late Friday night time slot that had belonged to The Midnight Special. Duke and Rosato were hired away by Saturday Night Live for 1981, prompting the return of Candy and O'Hara. The former low-budget TV satire series became SCTV Network 90, which is covered in a separate TV.com guide.moreless
  • 185
    Homicide

    Homicide

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    Seven Network (ended 1977)
    Homicide was Australia's first major drama series, and the most influential by any measure. Based around murder cases investigated by the Homicide squad at Melbourne's Russell Street police headquarters, Homicide single-handedly established a viable TV drama industry in Australia. Over 11 years and 510 episodes, Homicide acheived massive ratings (peaking at an incredible 54 at one point), made household names of its stars, spawned two sister series- Division 4 and Matlock Police- on rival networks, and still outlived them both! In the twenty-two years since it was last broadcast (in afternoon re-runs), the series has become renowned for its frequent car chases, slightly shonky 1970's fashions, and occasionally stilted dialogue. Some of Australia's best-known actors, writers, and directors got their start on Homicide, and without it- and the successors it generated- Australian drama would be very, very different.moreless
  • 186
    National Geographic Channel Specials

    National Geographic Channel Specials

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    CBS
    A series of documentary specials that covers a diverse number of subjects including the natural world of wild creatures, native cultures, historical discoveries, etc. The specials range from a Nazi Expedition to Monkey Hunters, all the way to the Penguin Death Zone, and exploring the Year of the Hamster.

    The NGC specials is a collection of educational documentaries presented by the National Geographic Society that first began it's telecast on CBS Primetime Specials from 1964 until 1973. From 1973 to 1975, it was on ABC Primetime Specials. PBS began telecasting the NGC specials at various times between 1975 to 1985. In 1985 and onwards, the programmes were telecast on various cable networks including the National Geographic Channel.moreless
  • 187
    Blue Peter

    Blue Peter

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    BBC
    Blue Peter is the longest running British childrens television show, celebrating it's fiftieth birthday in October 2008. The show airs as part of the CBBC strand of programming on BBC One on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 4.35pm. It is currently in it's 52nd series. The show began on October 16th 1958, and since then has gone through a cycle of 31 presenters, with Andy Akinwolere, Helen Skelton and Joel Defries currently presenting. The name Blue Peter comes from the blue and white flag which hoists a ship in port when it's getting ready to sail. The logo for the show is a blue and white boat designed by Tony Hart. Blue Peter badges are worn by presenters and different variations of the badge are awarded to both viewers and celebrity guests. The theme tune to the show is a take on the sea shanty Barnacle Bill and was originally composed by Ashworth Hope and has since been re-recorded ten times, the current version is orchestrated by Murray Gold. Throughout it's first series it ran for 15 minutes on Monday nights. From the 1960s until 1995, the show ran twice a week on Mondays and Thursdays, at 4.35pm until the mid 1970s, when it moved to 5.10pm. Throughout 1995 until 2001, three shows aired, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, in 2002 the show moved to 5pm and in 2007 remaining in the same time slot, shows aired on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. From September 2007, the show began airing twice a week and from February 2008 moved to it's current slot Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 4.35pm. The show has many features and traditions that it carry's from series to series. The show always features 'Blue Peter Pets', Petra the dog been the first. Their's been five dogs, seven cats, four tortoises and a parrot that have all appeared, before the current line up of two dogs - Mabel & Lucy, two cats - Socks & Cookie and a tortoise, Shelley. Another regular feature on the show is the 'Blue Peter Garden', based in the BBC Television Centre were Blue Peter is filmed, alot of features are based in the garden, so their's need for a regular Blue Peter gardener, Percy Thrower (who also originally designed the garden), Chris Crowder and Clare Bradley have all had the job, before Chris Collins took it on. The show has also made an appeal every year since the show began, these range from bring and buy sales been organised and endorsed by Blue Peter or to the more recent, Mission Nutrition campaign, helping kids eat better here and abroad.moreless
  • 188
    Beat-Club

    Beat-Club

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    ARD (ended 1972)
    The legendary West German rock series Beat-Club was broadcast from September 1965 through December 1972. It was broadcast from Bremen, Germany and produced by the regional TV network Radio Bremen, which at that time was part of the German Government radio chain ARD. Radio Bremen was the sole producer for episodes 1 – 34. Episodes 35 through 74 were produced jointly by Radio Bremen and the WDR network. Beat-Club was co-created by Gerhard Augustin and Mike Leckebusch. Gerhard ("Gerd") Augustin was a well-known disc jockey in Bremen and northern Germany. In 1963 he was the first DJ to spin records at local clubs. He was a moderator (co-host) of the first seven Beat-Club shows.

    Michael Leckebusch, a former trumpet player in a theatre band in Hamburg, came to work for Radio Bremen's TV station in 1965. He became the director of Beat-Club. Uschi Nerke joined Augustin as co-host of Beat-Club. She started with the first show and remained with the series through the end of its run. (She was not, however, involved in the concept or creation of the show.) Beat-Club premiered September 25, 1965. While this premiere episode may appear tame, the TV network at the time feared complaints by parents and other adults who didn't like rock music. This show, in fact, began with a plea by German TV personality William Wieben for tolerance. Rough translation: "Good day, dear Beat friends. The time has come. In few seconds we will begin the first show on German television made especially for you. As for you Ladies and Gentlemen who do not like Beat (rock) music, we ask for your understanding: this is a live show for young people. And now we're taking off..."

    Beat-Club
    is believed to have been Germany's first rock music series. Beat-Club should not be confused with another German TV series, Beat! Beat! Beat!, which premiered in 1966. Beat! Beat! Beat! was produced in a different city (Frankfurt am Main), by the regional network Hessischer Rundfunk. The series went through many format changes in its 7 years on the air. At first the show took on a (sort of) Cavern Club look. The walls behind the stage were brick - no fancy sets. The bands performed live while audience members were shown dancing. Sometime after show #8, Dave Lee Travis became a co-host. Travis had been a D.J. with "Radio Caroline," a pirate radio station that broadcasted into Britain from an offshore ship. Eddie Vickers, a soldier with the British Forces Broadcasting Service (BFBS), appeared sporadically as host during 1966-67.

    Dave Lee Travis' last appearance as host was on episode #45. His replacement was Dave Dee, of "Dave Dee, Dosy, Beaky, Mick & Titch." Dave Dee appeared on episodes 46 through 53.

    Around 1967, the series switched from live performances to lip-synching. The look of the set also changed, from the brick walls to the more familiar set with large cards in the background displaying the names of the performers. Another change around this time was the introduction of the "Go-Go-Girls," a troupe of young women who danced to recordings of current hits.

    "Beat Club" switched from black & white to color on December 31, 1969 (episode #50). Starting with episode 46 (September 1969) most of the music guests started performing live again.

    The final Beat-Club program aired in December 1972. The series was replaced by Musikladen, which lasted until 1984. Uschi Nerke was a co-host on Musikladen from 1972-1980.moreless
  • 189
    Nashville on the Road

    Nashville on the Road

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    (ended 1983)
    Welcome to the Nashville on the Road guide on tv.com.
    Nashville on the Road was a country music series taped at amusement & theme parks throughout North America. Jim Ed Brown hosted the series from 1975 through 1981. The first season regulars were Jim Ed Brown, Jerry Clower and The Cates Sisters. Singer Helen Cornelius joined Jim Ed Brown and Jerry Clower for the series' second season. Wendy Holcombe, a young banjo player, became a regular around the third season. Prior to that, Holcombe was a frequent Nashville on the Road guest.
    Jim Stafford took over as host in Fall 1981. He hosted the series until 1983, when Nashville on the Road ended its 8-year run.
    Note: As with most 1970s syndicated series, there were no official air dates. Whenever possible, we will try to list the earliest known air date for each episode.
    According to one source, there were 208 total episodes of Nashville on the Road, which would be 26 shows per season.moreless
  • 190
    Mayberry R.F.D.

    Mayberry R.F.D.

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    Mayberry R.F.D. premiered in 1968 as a spin off of The Andy Griffith Show (1960-68) with the highest ratings, at the time, of any new show in the history of television. Andy Griffith had grown tired of doing The Andy Griffith Show, so it was decided to continue the show using a different format. Sam Jones arrived in Mayberry during the final season of The Andy Griffith Show. He was very similar to Andy and, also, had a son. The last episode of The Andy Griffith Show served as the pilot for Mayberry R.F.D. In the first episode of Mayberry R.F.D., Andy and Helen were married. Don Knotts also gave a special appearance as Barney Fife. Shortly after Andy and Helen were married, they moved away. Most regulars from The Andy Griffith Show did stay including Howard Sprague, Emmett Clark, Goober Pyle, and, for the first two seasons, Bee Taylor. In 1971, Mayberry R.F.D. was cancelled by CBS in an effort to rid itself of its image as the "hillbilly" network. Main Title Theme Song "The Mayberry March" written by Earle Hagen and Carl Brandt CBS Broadcast History September 23, 1968 - September 6, 1971 ---- Mondays ---- 9:00 - 9:30 P.M. Nielsen Ratings Season 1 (1968-69) #4 (25.4) Season 2 (1969-70) #4 (24.4) Season 3 (1970-71) #15 (22.3) First Telecast: September 23, 1968 Last Telecast: March 29, 1971 Episodes: 78 color episodesmoreless
  • 191
    The Bob Newhart Show

    The Bob Newhart Show

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    CBS (ended 1978)
    Comedian Bob Newhart plays Dr. Robert Hartley, a clinical psychologist living in Chicago with his wife Emily, an elementary schoolteacher. His across-the-hallway neighbor, Howard Borden, is a divorced airline navigator. One of Bob's best friends is Dr. Jerry Robinson, an orthodontist who works on the same floor as Bob. There's also Bob's and Jerry's receptionist Carol Kester, as well as Bob's many clients, including Elliot Carlin, Lillian Bakerman, Emil Peterson and Victor Gianelli.

    The Bob Newhart Show was part of CBS' highly successful Saturday night lineup which also featured The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Carol Burnett Show and All in the Family. Another connection to The Mary Tyler Moore Show was that The Bob Newhart Show was produced by the same team that made that series a success.

    First Telecast: September 16, 1972 Last Telecast: April 1, 1978

    Episodes: 142 Color Episodes, 1 Special & 1 Unaired Pilot

    CBS Broadcast History September 1972-October 1976----Saturdays----9:30 p.m November 1976-September 1977----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. September 1977-April 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. June 1978-September 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. Characters: Stars: Dr. Robert Anthony "Bob" Hartley - A Clinical Psychologist who grew up in the Chicago area with an easy-going father and a manipulative, talkative mother. Bob attended Loyola University, where his best friend was Cliff "The Peeper" Murdock. Bob's office is in downtown Chicago, and he and his wife, Emily, live in a high-rise twenty minutes from his office. He often takes the train to work, but may take his car, especially if one of his groups has a session in the evening. Late in the show's run Bob publishes a book and is away for several episodes doing a book tour. Emily Joyce Hartley - Bob's wife, A schoolteacher. Emily comes from an expressive, gregarious family from the Seattle area. She married Bob after both had begun their careers, and they celebrate only their third anniversary during the show's first season. After working as a teacher for several years, Emily becomes principal, giving her a well-respected position.

    Howard Mark Borden - Next door neighbor, a divorced airplane navigator. For much of the series Howard's identity is shaped by his divorce. He is helpless around the house and depends on Emily and Bob for almost everything. He is a bit of a "swinger," dating stewardesses quite regularly, but deep-down he is a lonely soul. A bright spot in his life is his son, Howie. For a time Howard is engaged to Bob's sister, Ellen. Dr. Jerome "Jerry" Robinson - An Orthodontist whose office is near Bob's. Jerry was raised in an orphanage and, for the most part, is happy with shallow romantic relationships. He is a good sounding board for Bob, as Bob is for Jerry.

    Carol Kester Bondurant - The receptionist for all the doctor's on the floor where Bob has his office. After being overweight for much of her young life in Iowa, Carol lost over 100 pounds, then started a new life in Chicago. Carol always longed for Mr. Right until she met him in Larry Bondurant. They married after a very short courtship. Carol is an excellent receptionist, but sometimes longs for more meaning in her job. Thankfully, Bob is always ready to listen to her problems. Ellen Inez Hartley (1974-1976) - Bob's sister and Howard's girlfriend. Ellen is a part-time reporter, picking up any story she can until she can establish her career. Bob's Group Regulars: Elliot Carlin - The insecure, hostile patient Victor Gianelli - The hostile, insensitive patient Emil Peterson - The hen-pecked patient Lillian Bakerman - The insecure, motherly patient Michelle Nardo - The insecure, overweight patient Ed Herd - The timid door-to-door salesman patient. Other Doctors at the Timpau Medical Arts Building: Dr. Bernie Tupperman - The Urologist Dr. Phillip Newman - The ego-centric Plastic Surgeonmoreless
  • 192
    Top Cat

    Top Cat

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    ABC (ended 1962)
    The misadventures of a smart-aleck, street-wise alley cat name T.C., and his pals Benny, Choo Choo, Fancy, Brain and Spook; who get into many acts of trouble with Officer Charlie Dibble, and always have each other. Watch Top Cat on Boomerang. Like The Flintstones, Top Cat was another situation cartoon created by Hanna-Barbera Theme song lyrics: Top Cat The most effec-tu-al Top Cat Who's intellectual close friends get to call him T. C. Providing it's with dignity Top Cat The indisputable leader of the gang He's the boss He's the VIP He's a championship He's the most tip top - Top Cat Yes he's the chief He's the king, but above everything He's the most tip top - Top Cat!moreless
  • 193
    Get Smart

    Get Smart

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    In 1965 the cold war was made a little warmer and a lot funnier due in part to the efforts of an inept, underpaid, overzealous spy: Maxwell Smart, Agent 86. The hit comedy series 'Get Smart' is the creation of comic geniuses Buck Henry and Mel Brooks. Henry teamed with Brooks to create what has undoubtedly become one of the finest parody/satires of all time. The project seemed headed for success from the start: ABC had green lighted it based on the strength of the concept, and they had an actor already under contract to play Smart. Brooks was approached to write the pilot. As he was looking for a way to finance his new movie The Producers, he agreed. Deemed "not funny", the initial script was rejected by ABC. Undaunted, the production team shopped the script around and NBC accepted it with one minor change. They wanted Don Adams in the title role. And so, an unlikely legend was born. Set in Washington, D.C., the show features Agent 86 (Maxwell Smart), his boss (The Chief), Smart's partner and later wife (Agent 99) and a host of other agents both good and evil. Perhaps one of the most important elements of the show is the gadgetry created to help Smart in his quest to keep the free world free. On this show, anything including the kitchen sink can be a phone, a tape recorder, a camera or weapon. Looking for an Agent? Check under your seat cushion. Want a weapon? Try your finger-gun. Need to make a phone call? Open up that bologna sandwich. The show was painted in the broadest of strokes and played every moment for its own delightful reality. In order to give the agents of CONTROL, a series of worthy opponents, KAOS was created. Smart and 99 battled the likes of Mr. Big, The Claw, and Siegfried. On the home front, Max and 99 had a relationship that developed as the show ran and eventually they married. 99 soon gave birth to twins (a boy and a girl) and the Smart family (and the show) began to experience some growing pains. Get Smart ran from 1965 through 1970 on both NBC and CBS. For one month in 1995 FOX attempted to bring the series back with some changes; Max as the Chief, 99 as a Congresswoman, and the Smart twins were now inexplicably only one child. Despite the lack of success experienced by the sequel, Get Smart remains a favorite by agents and civilians alike. (TV Land) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Telecast NBC September 18, 1965 - September 20, 1969 CBS September 26, 1969 - September 11, 1970 Broadcast History Sep 1965 - Sep 1968, NBC Sat 8:30-9:00 Sep 1968 - Sep 1969, NBC Sat 8:00-8:30 Sep 1969 - Feb/Apr - Sep 1970, CBS Fri 7:30-8:00 Episodes 138 Episodes On Film 1 Episode in Black And White; 137 Episodes In Color -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------moreless
  • 194
    The F.B.I.

    The F.B.I.

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    The F.B.I. was Quinn Martin Productions's longest running series. It was unique as its stories were loosely supervised by at the time, current FBI director J. Edgar Hoover himself who watched over the presentation of proper bureau procedure.

    After each week's episode, Efrem Zimbalist Jr. would step from behind the part of Inspector Erskine and directly address the audience, asking for help to catch real criminals that were on the run.

    The show was sponsored by the Ford company which provided numerous vintage cars for chasing, crashing, and, occasionally, simple transportation.

    After the Watergate scandal, the public's perception of the American government and its institutions was tarnished and changed forever. In 1974, The F.B.I. was cancelled after 9 years and 240 episodes.moreless
  • 195
    Here Come the Brides

    Here Come the Brides

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    The Bolt Brothers bring 100 prospective brides to Seattle in order to avoid losing their logging crew. Production Companies * Screen Gems Television Distributors * American Broadcasting Company (ABC) (original airing) * Columbia TriStar Domestic Television (2001) * Sony Pictures Television (2002-) -------------------------- Filming Location Columbia/Warner Bros. Ranch, Burbank, California, USA -------------------------- CREW: Directed by Bob Claver Irving J. Moore E.W. Swackhamer Writing credits (in alphabetical order) Larry Brody writer Jo Heims writer N. Richard Nash writer John O'Dea writer Jay Simms writer Skip Webster writer Produced by Robert Jon Carlson .... associate producer Bob Claver .... executive producer Paul Junger Witt .... producer Stan Schwimmer .... producer Original Music by Warren Barker Jack Keller (song "Seattle") Hugo Montenegro (song "Seattle") Ernie Sheldon (song "Seattle") Cinematography by Fred Jackman Jr. Film Editing by Asa Boyd Clark Stunts David Cass Jr. .... stunts David S. Cass Sr. .... stunts Gary Epper .... stunts Whitey Hughes .... stunts George Orrison .... stunts Alan Tomason .... stunts Jesse Wayne .... stunts Henry Wills .... stunts Other crew Carl Boles .... gaffer Stephen Lodge .... set costumer Scotty McEwin .... camera operator Pat McGrath .... key costumer Randall Robinson .... second assistant camera -----------------------------------moreless
  • 196
    Alias Smith and Jones

    Alias Smith and Jones

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    ABC (ended 1973)
    Hannibal Heyes and Kid Curry, two successful and popular outlaw cousins in the old West, decide it´s time to go straight. The problem is that the governor just can´t give them amnesty right away, they have to prove that they deserve it. And in the meantime they will still be wanted. Hunting them is everybody, from sheriffs to bounty hunters, to posses and ordinary people. Hannibal Heyes/Joshua Smith is the thinker, the poker player and the optimist, while Kid Curry/Thaddeus Jones is the quick-drawing worrier who sometimes is a bit slow. Together they are Smith and Jones... Other regular characters include "Big Mac" McCreedy, a wealthy ranch owner, who´s feuding with his next door neighbour, senor Armendariz. Harry Briscoe is an agent with Bannerman detective agency, who´s perhaps not the brightest man around. Clementine Hale is a woman with an enormous zest for life. She owns the only picture of Heyes and the Kid and often uses it to get them to get her out of trouble. This show contained both humour and drama, as well as gunplay, poker games, and chases. It is said to be in part inspired by the movie Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), but it owes equally to TV series Maverick. (Peter Duel's appearance in most of the first season's episodes, with the black hat and his hair combed back, looks very similar to James Garner as Maverick.) On New Year's Eve, 1971, Peter Duel died from a gunshot wound to the head. The death was officially ruled suicide. Duel was fighting an alcohol addiction (he had been convicted of DWI), had been drinking that night, and was depressed over his legal problems and the state of his career, feeling that Alias Smith and Jones was hardly his best work. The runaway success of Alias Smith abd Jones led to a grueling schedule for the actors, as cast and crew worked overtime to produce more episodes to keep up with public demand, and this may also have played a part. The role of Hannibal Heyes was filled within only a few hours by Roger Davis, who had originally done the voice-overs in the opening credits, but the show´s popularity sank steadily - as did the interest for Western shows in general, and the series was canceled in January 1973.moreless
  • 197
    NFL on NBC

    NFL on NBC

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    NBC (ended 1997)
    The first time a football game was ever aired on television was October 1, 1939 when an experimental NBC affiliate aired a game between the Philadelphia Eagles and Brooklyn Dodgers. In 1955 NBC became the third over-the-air national home of the NFL (after ABC and DuMont) when they were the exclusive broadcaster of the Championship Game until 1963. From 1960-1961 select NBC affiliates also aired games involving the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Colts. From 1970-1997 NBC aired all Sunday afternoon games involving AFC teams, before that package moved to CBS with the start of the 1998 season. Football would later return to NBC in 2006, although as a different program: Sunday Night Football.moreless
  • 198
    Supermarket Sweep

    Supermarket Sweep

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    ABC (ended 2003)
    "Hey, the next time you're at the checkout counter and you hear the beep, think of all the fun you can have on, Supermarket Sweep! Following many years of waiting in the check out lines at local supermarkets Al Howard, with his wife, Alice, wondered what it would be like if just once the manager came to him and asked, "How would you like to run wild through the market and grab everything you can get your hands on and it won't cost you a cent!?" The idea of Supermarket Sweep was born. But, Al realized that he needed more than just 'running through a market' to make a successful game show, so he came up with other features, all relating to products we typically find in a market. Than he took his new show to ABC-TV and soon the show was viewed all across America, five days-a-week at 11 a.m. Eventually, Sweep went off ABC-TV but over the years, the TV audience never forgot the show that looked entirely different from any other game show. After all, what other show allows you to grab a supermarket shopping cart and act out your fantasy! Lifetime TV put the show back on in 1990. This time, Al created an exciting new element: the "Bonus Round." $5000 in cash was hidden somewhere in the market and a contestant team was given 60 seconds to find it. They had to solve 3 clues in that amount of time and if they did, their reward was the $5000 in cash! Have contestants been successful in finding the big money? Well, the record shows that up to this point in time, Supermarket Sweep has given away close to two million dollars in cash! (Yes, that's $2,000,000.00) The program used to be seen on PAX TV, but the show is no longer seen as of right now. But since PAX is famous for being America's "Family Network," the show is a perfect fit for them. After all, going to the supermarket is a family experience!moreless
  • 199
    Last of the Summer Wine

    Last of the Summer Wine

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    BBC (ended 2010)
    The longest running comedy series in the world started out, as many British comedy successes did, with a 1973 episode of the BBC series "Comedy Playhouse". The basis was simple but complex at the same time, telling the stories of three old men, who in all essence couldn't be more young at heart. The original trio consisted of Bill Owen, as Compo Simmonite, the scruffiest man in Yorkshire, with only two passions in life: his ferrets and Nora Batty (Kathy Staff). The second man of the group, Norman Clegg, played by Peter Sallis, was from the beginning shown as the most timid of the group, and also the one who gets carried away by the crazy ideas and schemes of his companions, which always seem to get him in trouble. Initially the third man of the group was Blamire, played by Michael Bates, but he was soon replaced by Foggy Dewhurst (Brian Wilde) who always seems to have a scheme or a story that somehow leads to his old days as a war hero... or so he says. In 1986 Brian Wilde left the series, to start filming his new sitcom, which proved to be a wrong move, as the show hadn't the success needed to sustain even a second series. during his 4 year absence from last of the summer wine Michael Aldridge played Seymour, the new third man of the trio, until 1990. Brian Wilde returned to do the next seven years of the show. When Brian Wilde left the series for the second time in 1997 Frank Thornton replaced him as the new third man on the trio as Truly Truelove of the Yard, an ex-police officer who's always remembering his past, both in the police force and in his former marriage to the former Mrs Truelove. When Bill Owen passed away, his son Tom joined the series, replacing him for the rest of the season as Compo's long lost son, Tom. Compo's permanent replacement would come the next year when Keith Clifford joined the cast as Billy Hardcastle, a man who fancies himself the descendant of Robin Hood. In 2003, the traditional trio became a quartet with the addition of Brian Murphy as Alvin Smedley, Nora Batty's new next door neigbour. With the addition of Alvin, an element of physical humour missing since Compo's death returned to the series. The quartet once again became a trio when Keith Clifford left the series in 2006. In 2009, the series was once again redesigned to allow Sallis and Thornton a reduced role on the series. A new third man was introduced in the form of Hobbo Hobdyke (Russ Abbott), a former milkman who fancies himself a former MI-5 agent. By combining Hobbo with Alvin and the electrical repairman, Entwistle (Burt Kwouk), a new trio was formed, proving once again the ability of the show to redesign itself over time. The main cast has always been surrounded by some amazing supporting cast throughout the run of the series, who helped to mantain the series as fresh today as it was when it premiered on the BBC.moreless
  • 200
    The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries

    The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries

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    ABC (ended 1979)
    The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries recount the adventures of the famous teenage sleuths, based on the two series of juvenile mystery novels by the Edward Stratemeyer syndicate under the names Franklin W. Dixon and Carolyn Keene. Frank and Joe Hardy are the sons of a private detective, and Nancy Drew is the daughter of a criminal attorney.

    In the first season, stories alternated week by week between the two families, but in the second season the independent Nancy Drew adventures were phased out so that all were working as a team. In the third season, Nancy Drew was eliminated completely and the Hardys became more involved in cases of international intrigue.

    also see The Hardy Boys Mysteriesmoreless
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