We're moving Forums to the Community pages. Click here for more information and updates.

  • 61
    Daniel Boone

    Daniel Boone

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1970)
    Frontier hero Daniel Boone conducts surveys and expeditions around Boonesborough, running into both friendly and hostile Native Americans, just before, during, and after the Revolutionary War. Aiding him during the run of the series are his lovely wife, Rebecca, precocious son, Israel, Oxford educated half-breed Mingo, former slave Gabe Cooper, easy going oafs Yadkin and Josh Clements, and tavern owner Cincinnatus.moreless
  • 62
    This is Your Life (UK)

    This is Your Life (UK)

    Follow
    BBC (ended 2003)
    Each week, a celebrity guest of honour is surprised and presented with a 'Red Book' by the show host. The host conducts a biography of the guest with the help of family members, friends, and acquaintances.moreless
  • 63
    The Mary Tyler Moore Show

    The Mary Tyler Moore Show

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1977)
    The Mary Tyler Moore Show first aired in September of 1970 and was a breakthrough of sorts with women's liberation. The Mary Tyler Moore ran for seven years on CBS and was one of the most popular and acclaimed sitcoms of the seventies.
    The show centered around Mary Richards, who moved to Minneapolis after a breakup with her fiancee and got a job as associate producer at a TV station, WJM-TV.
    Production Company: MTM Productions, Inc. (Copyright currently held by 20th Century Fox Film Corporation)
    Spinoffs: Rhoda Phyllis Lou Grant
    CBS Broadcast History September 1970-December 1971 – Saturday 9:30 December 1971-September 1972 – Saturday 8:30 September 1972-November 1976 – Saturday 9:00 November 1976-September 1977 – Saturday 8:00 Nielsen Ratings #22 in the 1970-1971 Season #10 in the 1971-1972 Season #7 in the 1972-1973 Season #9 in the 1973-1974 Season #11 in the 1974-1975 Season #19 in the 1975-1976 Season #39 in the 1976-1977 Seasonmoreless
  • 64
    The Carol Burnett Show

    The Carol Burnett Show

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1978)
    The Carol Burnett Show is one of Televisions greatest show's in history. Lasting 11 successful years starting in 1967 and ending in 1978 not without winning 25 Emmy Awards, 8 Golden Globe Awards and 3 People's Choice Awards. CBS Broadcast History
    September 1967-May 1971......Monday 10:00-11:00
    September 1971-November 1972......Wednesday 8:00-9:00
    December 1972-December 1977......Saturday 10:00-11:00
    December 1977-March 1978......Sunday 10:00-11:00
    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or better) #24 in the 1968-1969 Season
    #13 in the 1969-1970 Season
    #25 in the 1970-1971 Season
    #23 in the 1971-1972 Season
    #22 in the 1972-1973 Season
    moreless
  • 65
    Welcome Back, Kotter

    Welcome Back, Kotter

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1979)
    Gabe Kotter, formerly a Sweathog, returns to James Buchanan High as a teacher and is assigned the remedial class to which he once belonged. Mr. Kotter is an involved and caring teacher, which one would have to be in dealing with a certain four students in his class, who end up in trouble on a regular basis -- lady's man Vinnie Barbarino, the always cool Freddie "Boom-Boom" Washington, the tough Juan (Luis Pedro Phillipo de Huevos) Epstein, and the sheepish Arnold Dingfelder Horshack. Welcome Back, Kotter was based on Gabe Kaplan's own high school experiences with redmedial education and a teacher who cared dearly for her students. Changes on the show. Gabe Kaplan left the series in the third season. He hadn't expected the show to run as long as it had. Kotter was made Vice-Principal, and thus was seen considerably less. John Travolta, of course, found his own place as a celebrity, leaving the show around the same time Gabe Kaplan did (returning every so often as a "special guest star"). The replacement for Barbarino was Beau, who didn't help things much. By now the show had essentially lost its two biggest stars. Theme song. "Welcome Back" by John Sebastian: opening credits Welcome back, your dreams were your ticket out. Welcome back to that same old place that you laughed about. Well, the names have all changed since you hung around. But those dreams have remained and they've turned around. Who'd have thought they'd lead ya (who'd have thought they'd lead ya) Back here where we need ya (back here where we need ya)? Yeah, we tease him a lot 'cause we've got him on the spot, welcome back. Welcome back, welcome back, welcome back. Welcome back, welcome back, welcome back. end credits The second verse of the full song plays partially over the end credits. It goes as thus: Welcome back, we always could spot a friend. Welcome back, and I smile when I think how you must have been. And I know what a scene you were learnin' in. Was there something that made you come back again? And what could ever lead ya (what could ever lead ya) Back here where we need ya (back here where we need ya)? Yeah, we tease him a lot 'cause we've got him on the spot, welcome back. Welcome back, welcome back, welcome back. Welcome back, welcome back, welcome back. Catchphrases. Welcome Back, Kotter was a breeding ground for memorable catch phrases. If you have one that's been overlooked, feel free to contact the editor. Gabe Kotter: "Hey, Julie, wanna hear a joke?" (or similar dialogue) Vinnie Barbarino: "What? Where?" "I'm so confused!" "Ooookay, fine." "I said a ba-ba-ba-ba-Barbarino..." Freddie "Boom-Boom" Washington: "Hi there." "I don't happen to have it...handy." Juan Epstein: "Signed, Epstein's mother." Arnold Horshack: "Ooh! Ooh, ooh!" "Hello. How are ya? I'm Arnold Horshack." "Very impressive, Mr. Kotter!" "Be brave, little soldier." (or "buckaroo") ...and a very distinctive laugh. DVD? Welcome Back, Kotter has yet to be released properly on either video or dvd. Be sure to visit TVShowsonDVD to vote for Welcome Back, Kotter on dvd (you will have to register for free in order to vote).moreless
  • 66
    Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

    Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

    Follow
    PBS (ended 2001)
    "In a little toy neighborhood, a tiny trolley rolls past a house at the end of a street. Welcome toMister Rogers' Neighborhood." In the annals of children's TV, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood ranks among the longest-lasting and beloved shows. Upon its conclusion, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood was the longest-running series in PBS history (a record eclipsed by Sesame Street in 2003). Host Fred Rogers (known to millions as simply "Mister Rogers") used his gentle charm and mannerisms to communicate with his audience of children. Topics centered on nearly every inconceivable matter of concern to children, ranging from everyday fears related to going to sleep, getting immunizations and disappointment about not getting one's way to losing a loved one to death and physical handicaps. Rogers used simple songs and, on nearly every show, segments from the Neighborhood of Make-Believe (NOM) to make his point. A scale-model trolley was often (but not always) used to segue into the Make-Believe segments, said neighborhood being inhabited by puppet characters including King Friday XIII, Lady Elaine Fairchild and Daniel Striped Tiger. Many shows also featured visits from cast members – most often Mr. McFeely (tagline: "Speedy Delivery"), Robert Trow, Joe Negri and Chef Brockett (the local baker). Many times, Rogers also visited the neighborhood shops of both the regulars and guests. Each show began and ended with a camera panning over a scale neighborhood (said to represent the town where Rogers lived). Production History While today's longer-running PBS Kids shows reinvent themselves every five years, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood achieved, throughout its 31 seasons, that rarest of elements: consistency. It is a legacy that can all be traced through every aspect of Fred Rogers' television career. Some of the characters in Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, both real and imagined, had appeared in two of Fred Rogers' earlier programs, The Children's Corner for Pittsburgh's WQED in 1954 and the CBC's Misterogers in 1963. It was for Misterogers that Fred first appeared on-camera. Rogers returned to WQED in Pittsburgh to begin writing and hosting Mister Rogers' Neighborhood May 22, 1967. Several other public television stations from Chicago to Boston carried the show on a trial basis that year. Beginning February 19, 1968, the Mister Rogers' Neighborhood program that we know today, began airing nationwide on National Educational Television (NET), the predecessor to PBS. This was also the year David Newell, returned from Europe, began work for Rogers. He was in charge of the production as well as the neighborhood's Speedy Delivery service. (AN ASIDE: Rogers wanted to call the delivery man Mr. McCurdy after the man at the Sears-Roebuck Foundation, whose support launched Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. But the people at Sears-Roebuck called Rogers and said "Mr. McCurdy" was too self-serving. Thus Rogers went to his roots to rename Newell's deliveryman. "McFeely" was Rogers' middle name and the last name of his maternal grandfather.) Shows were produced as a daily strip from 1968 to 1976, at which time production was suspended. Counting black-and-white episodes, 590 shows were produced in that span. Production resumed at the beginning of the remote video age in 1979. Rogers went on location more, supervising videos of how people make things (a precursor to the TVO series Here's How!). Other characters would be introduced in the subsequent two decades. In all, 305 new programs were taped from 1979 through 2001. Of that volume, the most notable shows came in 1991, with Rogers focusing on calming children's fears during the first U.S. war with Iraq. PBS gradually narrowed the window for the 460 "pre-79" episodes with each new season from 1980 onward. When the number of "post-75" episodes was enough to cover entire years, the classic shows were retired, last airing on PBS in the summer of 1995. Despite the production stoppage and the subsequent passing of Fred Rogers on February 27, 2003, PBS continues to repeat Mister Roger's Neighborhood in all its original glory–an accomplishment unique among all PBS Kids shows.moreless
  • 67
    The Benny Hill Show

    The Benny Hill Show

    Follow
    ITV (ended 1989)
    This guide strives to be as complete a resource as possible for the third TV series to bear Benny Hill's name in the title, which ran on Thames Television (ITV) from 1969-1989, and has appeared around the world in countless formats and re-edits ever since.

    This is a guide to the original hour-long version.

    In America, the show was usually presented in a specially-edited half-hour format, which ran for a total of 111 editions (although Comedy Central did screen the hour-long format in the early-to-mid '90's, albeit with sections edited out, typically the musical guest or dance numbers). 30-minute repeats (not the same as were made for the American market) often aired in Britain when the show was "between seasons."

    Comedy Central aired the original hour-long format for Shows 32 - 58 (except for Show 40). Also, USA Network aired the shows in the original hour-long format in the late '80s/early '90s. At least Shows 54 - 58, possibly others, along with the independently-produced Benny Hill's World Tour: New York special (both channels had a few minutes cut for extra commercial time).

    In the U.S., the original hour-long shows have been issued on DVD (Region 1) under the umbrella title Benny Hill - Complete & Unadulterated. The first three sets were released with the subheading The Naughty Early Years, covering the years 1969-1971 (Shows 1-11, including three B&W episodes previously unseen in America), 1972-1974 (Shows 12-21) and 1975-1977 (Shows 22-31, plus his 1970 half-hour silent film Eddie in August). The final three sets bore the subheading The Hill's Angels Years, and covered the years 1978-1981 (Shows 32-41), 1982-1985 (Shows 42-50) and 1986-1989 (Shows 51-58). Also, the Golden Greats set that came out in 2001 (now out-of-print) included 6 episodes, Shows 46, 47, 50, 55, 56 and 58.

    In England, the original hour-long shows (complete with production slates and adcaps) have been released on DVD (Region 2) on a year-by-year basis, under the umbrella of The Benny Hill Annual, each set representing a different year. The 1970 set (Shows 3-6) contains the aforementioned Eddie in August, and the 1974 set (which only saw two new editions air, Shows 20 and 21) features his first two Thames specials from 1969. As of October 2006, the total releases go up to 1979 (Shows 34 and 35). The Benny Hill Annual sets from 1976 and 1977 onwards have adcaps but not VT slates.moreless
  • 68
    ABC Weekend Specials

    ABC Weekend Specials

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1997)
    A collection of animated and live-action specials that aired during ABC's Saturday morning lineup.
  • 69
    The Bob Hope Show

    The Bob Hope Show

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1975)
    The Bob Hope Show hosted by Bob Hope, debuted on April 9, 1950. During the 1952-1953 season, NBC rotated with other variety shows in a Sunday night block known as "The Colgate Comedy Hour" (Sept. 1950 to Dec. 1955). Also known as, "The Chevy Show with Bob Hope." When the first special debuted in October of 1950 it was the most expensive television program made up to that point - costing an astronomical $1,500 a minute to produce. Bob Hope had his own television show and radio show at the same time. For the next three seasons, The Bob Hope Show was broadcast once a month on Tuesday nights, giving Milton Berle a week off. Bob ended his radio show in April, 1956. Bob Hope also had another show by a similar name, "The Bob Hope Show (All Star Revue)". In addition, he performed in "Specials" for many years. It is the longest running variety program in television's history with a record of 45 years of televised entertainment.moreless
  • 70
    The Red Skelton Show

    The Red Skelton Show

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1971)
    Welcome to The Red Skelton Show guide at TV.com. Season 1 and 2 (1951-53) on NBC 30 mins.
    Season 3-18 (1953-70) on CBS 30 mins. (1954 Summer show) Red Skelton Review 60min. (1962-70) Red Skelton Hour Season 19 (1970-71) Monday on NBC 30 mins. (1951-52) Emmy Best Comedy Show. Best Comedian.
    (1958-59) Emmy nom for Best Comedy Series
    (1959-60) Emmy nom for Director in Comedy
    (1959-60) Emmy nom for Program in Humor
    (1960-61) Emmy for Writing in Comedy
    (1961-62) Emmy nom for Director in Comedy
    (1961-62) Emmy nom for Program in Humor
    (1961-62) Emmy nom for Writing in Comedy
    (1962-63) Emmy nom for Program in Comedy
    (1962-63) Emmy nom for Program in Variety
    (1962-63) Emmy nom for Writing in Comedy
    (1964-65) Emmy nom for Entertainment
    (1965-66) Emmy nom for Variety Series
    (1966-67) Emmy nom for Electronic Production.
    (1969-70) Emmy nom for Choreography. Ratings: (1951-52) #5moreless
  • 71
    As The World Turns

    As The World Turns

    Follow
    CBS (ended 2010)
    As the World Turns first premiered on April 2, 1956, and has been a mainstay on CBS daytime ever since. The show takes place in the fictional town of Oakdale, Illinois, and revolves around the lives of it's inhabitants. Originally the central family was the Hughes', however today the stories mostly resolve around the enormous Snyder family. As the World Turns is produced by Proctor and Gamble, the same company that produces Guiding Light, the only show to have a longer on-air tenure than ATWT. This year, ATWT celebrated its 54th Anniversary of being on the air in April 2010, the show will end it's run on Sept 17th 2010.moreless
  • 72
    American Bandstand

    American Bandstand

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1989)
    "American Bandstand" brought rock 'n' roll music into millions of households and showed Americans how to do the latest dance steps. Dick Clark, "America's Oldest Teenager" hosted the series for most of its run.
    Regular Bandstand segments were "The Spotlight Dance," "Rate-A-Record" and The "American Bandstand" Top 10 Countdown. "The Spotlight Dance" featured 2 or more couples dancing to a softer tune. "Rate-A-Record" had teenage contestants rate and comment on a record played on the show. The "American Bandstand Top Ten" was a countdown of the Top 10 hits of the day.
    "American Bandstand" began as a local Philadelphia show called "Bandstand," which made its debut October 13, 1952 on WFIL-TV Channel 6.
    The series was retitled "American Bandstand" on August 5, 1957 when ABC began broadcasting it nationwide. For its first 6 seasons, "American Bandstand" aired Mondays through Fridays.
    Two major changes took place during the 1963-64 season. On September 7, 1963, it became a once-a-week series airing Saturday afternoons. A few months later on February 8, 1964, production of the show moved from Philadelphia, PA to its new home in Los Angeles, CA.
    Despite these changes, American Bandstand's fans remained loyal to the series, as it continued to present the latest music and dances. It even inspired another long-running dance show, "Soul Train."
    American Bandstand's long association with ABC ended on September 5, 1987. Two weeks later, on September 19, 1987, the series returned in first-run syndication. On April 8, 1989, American Bandstand made another move, this time to the USA cable network. It also featured a new host, David Hirsch. This version lasted only 6 months with the final show airing on October 7, 1989. In 1995, VH-1 began showing vintage episodes of American Bandstand. These edited 30-minute reruns featured many of the stars that the show helped make famous.
    "Bandstand" Air Dates (local Philadelphia show)
    (1) "Bob Horn's Bandstand" (hosted by Bob Horn) October 13, 1952 - July 6, 1956
    (2) "Bandstand" (hosted by Dick Clark) July 9, 1956 - August 2, 1957
    "American Bandstand" Air Dates
    Weekday Afternoon shows (ABC-TV network, Monday-Friday) August 5, 1957 - August 30, 1963
    Broadcast times:
    August 5-November 15, 1957 - AB aired from 3:00 to 4:30pm.
    November 18, 1957-October 10, 1958 - AB was split into 2 shows airing from 3:00 to 3:30pm and from 4:00 to 5:00pm. AB was split up by the game show Who Do You Trust?
    October 13, 1958-September 29, 1961 - one show airing from 4:00pm to 5:30pm.
    October 2, 1961-September 28, 1962 - from 4:00 to 4:50pm*
    October 1, 1962-August 30, 1963 - from 4:00 to 4:30pm
    Note: *From October 2, 1961 through September 28, 1962, AB was followed by "American Newsstand," a current affairs program produced by ABC News.
    Nighttime shows (ABC network, Monday nights 7:30-8:00pm) In addition to the weekday shows, American Bandstand had a 13-week (October 7 - December 30, 1957) Prime-time run. (Note: This shouldn't be confused with "The Dick Clark Saturday Night Beechnut Show", which ran from February 15, 1958 to September 10, 1960.)
    Saturday Afternoon shows (abc-TV network) September 7, 1963 - September 6, 1986
    During these 23 years, the air times varied anywhere between 12:30 and 2:30pm on Saturdays (sometimes earlier on the West Coast). Most of these shows were an hour long. (Some episodes were shortened for sporting events.)
    On AB's Last Season on ABC-TV, it aired from 12:30 to 1:00pm (from September 13, 1986 through September 5, 1987).
    Syndicated American Bandstand episodes ran from September 19, 1987 to August 27, 1988 (times varied by city). This version was syndicated by LBS Communications. (According to some sources the syndicated series ran through April 1, 1989. But we haven't been able to find any AB listings beyond August 27, 1988.)
    USA Cable Network (Saturday afternoons) From April 8 to October 7, 1989, AB was aired from 12noon to 1:00pm. David Hirsch was the host of this final version.moreless
  • 73
    The Muppet Show

    The Muppet Show

    Follow
    (ended 1981)
    After the success of Sesame Street in 1969, Muppet creator Jim Henson wanted to have a chance at his own series. In 1974, Henson shot a Muppet special called The Muppets' Valentine Show, which would later become a precursor for The Muppet Show. The special starred famous muppet, Kermit the Frog, with a cast of new muppets including: George the Janitor, Droop the Anteater, Crazy Donald (later named Crazy Harry), Brewsters the oldtimer, Mildred the goose, and Rufus (later named Muppy). Many of these characters were used during the first season of The Muppet Show, and quickly faded away to background characters. The special featured actress Mia Farrow, who taught the muppets about love, and that everyone loves something. Afterwards in 1975, Henson shot the failed pilot for the Muppet Show: Sex and Violence. Amazingly, Kermit the Frog was not in the pilot at all! Instead, the host was wimpy, Nigel, who Jim Henson wrote out of the show soon afterwards. After about a year, the muppet team went to the United Kingdom and were given the green light for the Muppet Show. The show became one of the top syndicated comedies of all time! The show featured a new group of Muppet characters including: Fozzie Bear, Miss Piggy, Gonzo, Scooter, Beauregard, Rowlf the Dog, and The Electric Mayhem. Each show featured a celebrity guest star, who were either personal friends of Henson, or his manager. The Muppet Show lasted for 5 years, and 120 episodes, two spin offs, and several movies. Theme Song: It's time to play the music It's time to light the lights It's time to meet the Muppets On the Muppet Show tonight It's time to put on makeup It's time to dress up right It's time to raise the curtain On the Muppet Show tonight Why do we always come here I guess we'll never know It's like a kind of torture To have to watch the show And now lets get things started Why don't you get things started It's time to get things started On the most sensational Inspirational Celebrational Muppetational This is what we call the Muppet Show! Characters Kermit the Frog Originally from "Sam & Friends" (1955), then later Sesame Street (1969), Kermit is the host of The Muppet Show. Miss Piggy Self-centered, yet very persuasive. Wants to marry Kermit. Fozzie Bear Furry, fuzzy, funny, fabulous, free-willing, fast, and frantic....he's Fozzie Bear. The Great Gonzo A "whatever". Scooter the Go-Fer Kermit's stage assistant. Rizzo the Rat Gonzo's sidekick. A rat with rat-itude. Rowlf the Dog Originally from The Jimmy Dean Show, Rowlf is a piano playing dog, and the first muppet to become a national star. Statler and Waldorf The two old-timers who sat in the balcony. Doctor Bunsen Honeydew The Muppet Show's scientist. Beeker Meep Meep Meep's meep. Beauregard: The Muppet Show's slow-witted janitor. Pops: Greeted the guests at the begining. The Swedish Chef Bork bork bork. The Eletric Mayhem The Muppet Show's band including: Dr. Teeth (lead vocalist and piano player), Sgt. Floyd Pepper (Bass, and Janice's boyfriend), Janice (guitarist, Floyd's girlfriend), Zoot (sax is his act), Lips (trumpet player), and Animal (HE WANT TO BAT DRUM!) First Telecast: September 27, 1976 Last Telecast: June 8, 1981 Episodes: 120 color episodes Spin-Offs: Muppet Babies and Muppets Tonight! Spin Offs: * Muppet Babies was Jim Henson's first animated series. The show featured familiar Muppet faces, only as babies. New characters included Nanny (the nanny of the nursery), and Skeeter (Scooter's twin sister). * Muppets Tonight! was basically a modern remake of The Muppet Show, featuring celebrity guest stars who at the peak of perfection at the time. New characters included: Pepe (the king prawn, okay?), Clifford (the cool hippie muppet)and Johnny Fiami and Sal Movies * The Muppet Movie (1979) * The Great Muppet Caper (1981) * The Muppets Take Manhattan (1984) * The Muppet Christmas Carol (1993) * Muppet Treasure Island (1996) * Muppets From Space (1999) * Kermit's Swamp Years (2002) * It's a Very Merry Muppet Christmas Movie (2002) * The Muppets' Wonderful Wizard of Oz (2005)moreless
  • 74
    The Merv Griffin Show

    The Merv Griffin Show

    Follow
    (ended 1986)
    The Merv Griffin Show first aired on NBC (1962-1963, then again 1965-1968), CBS (1969-1972) and in syndication afterwards. Merv Griffin became a television host after filling in for Jack Parr on the Tonight Show in 1962 which impressed NBC enough to develop The Merv Griffin Show. Originally airing in black and white the first color telecast on The Merv Griffin Show was on August 24, 1967. Merv interviewed celebrities, politicians and some very interesting people over the years. A charming, eloquent host Merv had this wonderful interest in people which usually displayed itself in his signature expression of OOOOO and rapt attention to his guests.moreless
  • 75
    The Incredible Hulk

    The Incredible Hulk

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1982)
    Dr. David Banner was a research scientist trying to find a way to tap into the hidden strength that all humans possess. Then, one night in his labratory, an experiment went wrong, causing him to be overexposed to gamma radiation. Now, whenever angered or distressed, the mild-mannered scientist finds himself transforming into a powerful seven-foot green creature known as The Incredible Hulk. The creature is guided by David's personality, dealing with whatever distresses David. But unfortunately, David has no control over the creature's actions. Nor can he remember what he had done during his Hulkish states. He travels around the country in search of a cure, while taking various odd jobs under different aliases. During this odyssey, he tries to avoid the pursuit of investigative reporter Jack McGee, who suspects the Hulk of murder, and who is determined to discover the creature's true identity.moreless
  • 76
    SportsCenter

    SportsCenter

    Follow
    ESPN
    Welcome to the SportsCenter guide on TV.com. SportsCenter debuted September 7, 1979 to launch ESPN. It shows highlights of sporting events from around the United States everyday. "This is SportsCenter!" "Booyah!" "Back, Back, Back, Back, Gone!" "All The Way - Touchdown!" are some popular catch phrases from the cast at ESPN and SportsCenter. SportsCenter airs weeknights at 9AM, 12 PM, 6PM, 11 PM and 1 AM ET on ESPN. (Presented in HDTV on ESPNHD)moreless
  • 77
    NOVA

    NOVA

    Follow
    PBS
    Seen in more than 100 countries, NOVA is the most watched science television series in the world and the most watched documentary series on PBS. It is also one of television's most acclaimed series, having won every major television award, most of them many times over. Each week NOVA takes an in depth look at a particular topic or individual in the science field. NOVA's topics cover all branches of science and engineering. NOVA's unique way of presenting each topic can be interesting to both those with no prior knowledge or those whose life's work is being covered.moreless
  • 78
    The Honeymooners

    The Honeymooners

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1978)
    328 Chauncey Street, Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, New York is where the apartment residences of the Kramdens and the Nortons stand. These four people, fifteen years after the depression are still struggling to make ends meet. Ralph Kramden and Alice Gibson married following his acquiring employment as a bus driver with the Gotham Bus Company. Edward Lillywhite Norton, a sewer worker, and his wife, Thelma 'Trixie', live above the Kramdens. The stories depict the sincere attempts of two men attempting to better their lives, and the ensuing frustrations when their schemes to strike it rich inevitably backfire. Although "The Honeymooners" is one of the best remembered comedy highlights of TV's golden age, it was seen for most of its history as a segment within other programs. From 1951-1952, "The Honeymooners" was first seen as a sketch within DuMont's "Cavalcade of Stars", with Pert Kelton originating the role of Alice and with Art Carney's first appearance as a cop. (See season 1). Carney wouldn't appear as Ed Norton until 11/2/1951 along with Elaine Stritch portraying Trixie in her 1 & only appearance. Joyce Randolph would join the cast on 12/7/1951. On 3/30/1952, with Gleason and company departing to CBS in the fall, Gleason, Kelton, & Carney perform a 10 minute "Honeymooners" sketch on Ed Sullivan's "Toast of the Town" (Season 5, Episode 30) titled "The Ring Salesman". This sketch can be found on the "The Honeymooners Lost Episodes" DVD Box Set." On 5/4/1952 Gleason, Kelton, & Carney perform a 10 minute "Honeymooners" sketch on "Toast of the Town" (Season 5, Episode 35) titled "Alice And Ralph Get Dressed For A Date Last Night". This sketch can be found on rare "Best of Ed Sullivan" VHS's, it is not on the DVD box set. In the fall of 1952, Jackie moved his show to CBS and "The Jackie Gleason Show" was born. (See seasons 2, 3, & 4), Audrey Meadows assumes the role of Alice. In 1955 Gleason wanted a respite from the full-hour live weekly variety show. It was decided to film a full season of half-hour Honeymooners shows. All hail "The Classic 39" (see season 5). In 1956, after the less-than-anticipated response to the filmed "Honeymooners", Gleason returned to a regular variety format for 1 additional season (see season 6). In 1957 as part of the final season of "The Jackie Gleason Show", Jackie brought aboard Jerry Bresler & Lyn Duddy to create what is now known as the 1957 - Trip To Europe musical episodes. In 1960, Jackie Gleason brings back Ralph Kramden and Ed Norton in the "Jackie Gleason Special: The Big Sell." Not available on DVD. The Honeymooners sketch that is performed is a take on the classic 39 "Ralph Kramden, Inc." In 1962, after a 5 year hiatus from weekly Television, Jackie returned with "Jackie Gleason and His American Scene Magazine" (see season 6). From 1962 to 1964 this show was from New York. Only 2 "Honeymooners" sketches were performed with Sue Ann Langdon taking on the role of Alice and Patricia Wilson as Trixie. In 1964 Jackie moved his "American Scene Magazine" from NY to Miami, retitled it "The Jackie Gleason Show." To move the entire crew and staff Jackie chartered a train of 14 cars for over 100 passengers and dubbed it "The Great Gleason Express". This would be where the remaining "Honeymooners" would be filmed, though still set in Bensonhurst. In 1966, Audrey Meadows returned for 1 special episode, "The Adoption", a classic Jerry Bresler & Lyn Duddy musical episode featuring Ralph & Alice's attempt to adopt a baby. This would be the last episode filmed in black & white and is a precursor to what is now known as the "Color Honeymooners" over the next 4 seasons. From 1966 to 1970, the majority of these episodes were Jerry Bresler & Lyn Duddy mini-musicals, now known as the "Color Honeymooners". Sheila MacRea would portray Alice and Jane Kean as Trixie. These episodes can be seen on the "American Life TV Network" with all 4 seasons on DVD. On 9/30/1968 Jackie appears uncredited as Ralph Kramden in one of the funniest episodes of "Here's Lucy" titled "Lucy Visits Jack Benny". Jack Benny appears as himself. Tis episode appears on "Here's Lucy" DVD Season 1. On 10/11/1973, Jackie Gleason brought "The Honeymooners" back in a 1 time special that aired on CBS titled "Women's Lib" (see season 12). On 5/22/1974, Jackie Gleason and Julie Andrews portray Ralph Kramden & Ed Norton on the special "Julie & Jackie: How Sweet It Is". This would mark the only time Jackie would portray Ralph alongside anyone else portraying Ed Norton. Jackie always said he could never do Ralph without any other guy other than Art Carney. From 1976 to 1978, the last 4 "Honeymooners" were filmed in Miami and Atlantic City (see season 12). These holiday themed specials that aired on ABC would see the return of Audrey Meadows as Alice and Jane Kean as Trixie. On February 6, 1985 Jackie Gleason holds a press conference at New York's "21 Club" with Audrey Meadows and Joyce Randolph by his side. It is here that Jackie announces that the "The Honeymooners: The Lost Episodes" will make their television debut on Showtime in September 1985. On May 13, 1985 NBC airs "The Honeymooners Reunion" a new special showing numerous clips and scenes of upcoming "Lost Episodes". From May through August 1985 the "Museum of Broadcasting" presents "Discovery: Lost Episodes" airing 17 "Lost Episodes" ready for public viewing. On September 2, 1985 Showtime airs a 3 & 1/2 hour "Lost Episodes Marathon" airing 8 complete "Lost" classics. In September 1986 the "Lost Episodes" made their non-cable debut bumping the total # of "Honeymooners" episodes in syndication from 39 to 118. Thank you Jackie Gleason!! NOTE: This episode guide contains all episodes of "The Honeymooners" that were either sketches as seen on "The Jackie Gleason Show" and "American Scene Magazine" as well as the "Classic 39" and TV specials. All "Honeymooners" specials as well as specials that celebrated Jackie Gleason in which "Honeymooners" clips and sketches aired are in the "Specials" link. A new website maintained by the Gleason estate is now up & fully running at http://www.jackiegleason.com/moreless
  • 79
    Monday Night Football

    Monday Night Football

    Follow
    ESPN
    "Monday Night Football really got on the air because of Pete Rozelle," recalls former producer Don Ohlmeyer. Indeed, it was Rozelle's reputation for public relations and marketing that created a prime-time venue for the National Football League. The prototypes for Monday Night Football were those annual Monday night games staged from 1966 to 1969 inclusive on CBS. St. Louis hosted three of them, and it seemed natural for the NFL to make Monday night their regular turf. The only trouble was, Rozelle couldn't get a network to agree.
    .
    CBS did not want to lose Gunsmoke. NBC had Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In, TV's highest-rated show the past two years. Even ABC, floundering in third place in the ratings, was unsure. Rozelle then threatened to put the Monday night package in syndication via the Hughes Television Service. So ABC bought in. NFL owners themselves weren't keen on Monday Night Football. Some thought the gates would be dormant. But then-Cleveland Browns owner Art Modell, who knew a thing or two about marketing himself, agreed to host the first MNF game. He asked that the Browns face the Jets to maximize ABC's first-night audience. The result was a smashing success.
    .
    For 36 years, Monday Night Football would air on ABC. Don Meredith and Howard Cosell were, along with Keith Jackson, part of the original team that started in 1970. After Jackson returned full-time to ABC's college football broadcasts, the network hired Frank Gifford away from CBS. From there, Monday Night Football began its most memorable years. It got ratings thanks to the wide appeal that Cosell, Meredith, and Gifford collectively garnered. Except for a shift in the mid-70s that sent Meredith briefly to another network, ABC played a strong football card for twelve years.
    .
    The separate departures of Meredith and Cosell left the Monday Night Football booth in a shaky transition period during the mid-80s. Though they sometimes got it right on the field, with the high-water mark being Miami's romping of the eventual Super Bowl champion Chicago Bears in 1985, it was plain that the booth could not work with three ex-players (what Howard Cosell had labeled "jockocracy"). The likes of Fred Williamson, O.J. Simpson, and Joe Namath were quickly disposed. The second-most-stable team was assembled in 1986, when veteran ABC sportscaster Al Michaels joined Gifford. Rounding out the booth was future Hall of Fame offensive lineman Dan Dierdorf. They would share more than a decade of prime time football coverage, including three Super Bowls.
    .
    For all its considerable charm and novelty, one thing Monday Night Football did not achieve was a proper farewell to Frank Gifford. After the 1997 season, the booth welcomed the recently-retired Bengals quarterback Boomer Esiason. Gifford was cramped in a studio to introduce pregame and halftime stories for the 1998 season. Neither change worked, as Gifford was out of ABC after one year and Boomer Esiason agreed to a contract settlement in 2000. The next two years were the least successful. Joining Al Michaels was ABC college football analyst Dan Fouts and Dennis Miller. Even though their first season had an abundance of nail-biters (witness the Jets' Midnight Miracle over the Dolphins), the new recruits were unable to get in focus. Miller in particular was over-rehearsed in the hours leading up to a broadcast. Both he and Fouts were out of the booth after January 7, 2002.
    .
    ABC needed a lift for the show, and thought they had it when John Madden (who had recanted on his offer to join ABC in 1994) came over from another network. Monday Night Football went from planes to buses for the next four years. Again, though, the players were meant to be bigger stars than Madden or Michaels. Sometimes it showed, such as the Colts' stunning comeback over the defending World Champion Buccaneers in 2003. But in all honesty, the hundred forces that had emerged after 1970 to compete with Monday Night Football, were collectively getting the better of ABC. Thus, on April 18, 2005, a new eight-year contract sent Monday Night Football to ABC's adopted sister network, ESPN.moreless
  • 80
    Alice

    Alice

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1985)
    Alice was first seen in August of 1976 but was based on the 1975 film, Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore starring Ellen Burstyn and centering around Alice Hyatt. The television series had Linda Lavin starring as Alice. After her husband, Donald, was killed in a truck accident, Alice Hyatt and her 12-year-old son, Tommy, moved out of their home in New Jersey and headed for Hollywood.

    Alice's dream was to become a singer but for the time being she got work as a waitress in a greasy spoon, Mel's Diner after her car breaks down in Phoenix. Mel was gruff and demanding and constantly bossing his three waitresses around.

    The other two waitresses, in the beginning were Flo and Vera. Flo was the man-hungry southern belle, who's favorite saying was "Kiss My Grits." The other waitress, Vera, was shy and quiet and somewhat, as Mel put it, "dingy." Flo left in 1980 for her own series and was replaced by Belle who was later replaced by Jolene.

    In 1985, the series came to an end with Mel selling the diner, a married Vera, was now pregnant, Jolene was planning to open a beauty shop and Alice's dream was finally coming true, she became a lead singer with a band in Nashville.

    Spin-offs: Flo

    CBS Broadcast History

    September-October 1976----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. November 1976-September 1977----Saturdays----9:30 p.m. October 1977-October 1978----Sundays----9:30 p.m. October 1978-February 1979----Sundays----8:30 p.m. March 1979-September 1982----Sundays----9:00 p.m. October-November 1982----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. March-April 1983----Mondays----9:00 p.m. April-May 1983----Sundays----9:30 p.m. June 1983-January 1984----Sundays----8:00 p.m. January-December 1984----Sundays----9:30 p.m. January-March 1985----Tuesdays----8:30 p.m. June-July 1985----Tuesdays----8:30 p.m.

    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 60 or Better)

    #30 in the 1976-1977 Season #8 in the 1977-1978 Season #13 in the 1978-1979 Season #4 in the 1979-1980 Season #7 in the 1980-1981 Season #5 in the 1981-1982 Season #25 in the 1983-1984 Season #60 in the 1984-1985 Season

    First Telecast: August 31, 1976 Last Telecast: July 2, 1985

    Episodes: 202 Color Episodes

    Theme Song:

    "There's a New Girl in Town" Written by: Alan and Marilyn Bergman and David Shire

    Sung by: Linda Lavinmoreless
  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10