• 101
    The Munsters

    The Munsters

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    CBS (ended 1966)
    The Munsters was one of the two "creepy" sitcoms that began in 1964. CBS aired The Munsters and ABC aired The Addams Family. Both of them lasted only two years and finished their network run within a week of each other.

    The Munsters live at 1313 Mockingbird Lane.

    Show Characters

    Herman Munster: The irascible head of the family. One of Frankenstein's monsters, he works at a funeral parlor, and has the same intelligence as some of the "stiffs" he works with.

    Lily Munster: Also known as the family homemaker. She has long flowing black hair with a white streak, and manages to keep up her appearance, despite cleaning and cooking.

    Eddie Munster: A typical American boy who howls at the moon and goes to sleep with his Woof-Woof.

    Marilyn Munster: The plain one of the bunch, is actually an all American beautiful blonde, who also goes to college.

    Grandpa Munster: The original Count Dracula, who was born and raised in Transylvania and doubles as a mad scientist. First Telecast: September 24, 1964 Last Telecast: September 1, 1966

    Episodes: 70 B&W Episodesmoreless
  • 102
    I Dream of Jeannie

    I Dream of Jeannie

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    I Dream of Jeannie had a premise of astronaut Tony Nelson finding a beautiful, blond 2000-year-old genie in a bottle after a flight. Jeannie turns out to be mischievous, a little innocent and very much in love with her master. The only other person who knows their secret is Roger Healey, Tony's best friend and fellow astronaut. NASA psychiatrist Dr. Alfred Bellows is frustrated and flustered by the strange things that always seem to happen around Major Nelson, but never actually finds out what's causing them. The 30 episodes in the first season was in black and white while the remaining 109 episodes were color. The show was written, produced and created by Sidney Sheldon. The show went into production in December, 1964. The 1st season 30 episodes were filmed in black and white film. (The black and white episodes have been colorized for reruns by some syndicated packages). The show went into color in 1966. The show finished filming in January, 1970. A Jeannie reunion on The Today Show on March 1, 1995 had an interview with Barbara Eden and Larry Hagman. Barbara Eden reprised her role of Jeannie in the movie A Very Brady Sequel and in a commercial for Lexus in 1998. The Donny and Marie Show had guests Barbara Eden, Larry Hagman, Bill Daily and Sidney Sheldon in November, 1999. Barbara Eden hosted a 8 part segment for the syndicated Entertainment Tonight and Entertainment This Week in May, 1984 about 1960's comedy shows including I Dream Of Jeannie. That segment had interviews with Larry Hagman, Bill Daily and Hayden Rorke. Barbara Eden, Larry Hagman and Bill Daily reunited for a group interview with Larry King in June, 2003.moreless
  • 103
    Carol Burnett and Friends

    Carol Burnett and Friends

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    CBS (ended 1978)
    Carol Burnett and Friends was a syndicated, truncated version of The Carol Burnett Show, showing only the sketches.The show star's Carol Burnett and co-star's Tim Conway and Harvey Korman, Carol Burnett's related shows: The Carol Burnett Show Carol Burnett and Company The Carol Burnett Show (1991) Carol & Companymoreless
  • 104
    Sealab 2020

    Sealab 2020

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    "This is the year two thousand and twenty. The place is the Challenger Seamount, the top of an underwater mountain. A complex beneath the sea. 250 men, women and children live here, each of them a scientist pioneer. For this is our last frontier, a hostile environment which may hold the key to tomorrow. Each day, these oceanauts meet new challenges as they build their city beneath the sea. This is Sealab 2020." Commanded by Doctor Paul Williams, the Sealab researchers explored the nearby ocean floor with advanced technology like the Deep Diver craft. Only 13 episodes of Sealab 2020 were ever made, and the show was not rerun in following years. In 2001, Cartoon Network reworked footage from the show into Sealab 2021, part of their "Adult Swim" block of programming. Dialog was redubbed with often risque, adult-oriented humor replacing the serious child-oriented lines and ecological messages of the original show.moreless
  • 105
    Mayberry R.F.D.

    Mayberry R.F.D.

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    Mayberry R.F.D. premiered in 1968 as a spin off of The Andy Griffith Show (1960-68) with the highest ratings, at the time, of any new show in the history of television. Andy Griffith had grown tired of doing The Andy Griffith Show, so it was decided to continue the show using a different format. Sam Jones arrived in Mayberry during the final season of The Andy Griffith Show. He was very similar to Andy and, also, had a son. The last episode of The Andy Griffith Show served as the pilot for Mayberry R.F.D. In the first episode of Mayberry R.F.D., Andy and Helen were married. Don Knotts also gave a special appearance as Barney Fife. Shortly after Andy and Helen were married, they moved away. Most regulars from The Andy Griffith Show did stay including Howard Sprague, Emmett Clark, Goober Pyle, and, for the first two seasons, Bee Taylor. In 1971, Mayberry R.F.D. was cancelled by CBS in an effort to rid itself of its image as the "hillbilly" network. Main Title Theme Song "The Mayberry March" written by Earle Hagen and Carl Brandt CBS Broadcast History September 23, 1968 - September 6, 1971 ---- Mondays ---- 9:00 - 9:30 P.M. Nielsen Ratings Season 1 (1968-69) #4 (25.4) Season 2 (1969-70) #4 (24.4) Season 3 (1970-71) #15 (22.3) First Telecast: September 23, 1968 Last Telecast: March 29, 1971 Episodes: 78 color episodesmoreless
  • 106
    Super Sentai

    Super Sentai

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    TV Asahi
    Welcome to the Super Sentai guide at TV.com. Since 1975, the Super Sentai series has become a staple in Japanese society. Super Sentai was used as the source material for what is known in America as Power Rangers starting in 1992 with ZyuRanger and currently up to Zyuden Sentai Kyoryuger. Gokaiger marked the 35th anniversary of Super Sentai in Japan.

    The following is a full list of past and present Sentai seasons:

    - Himitsu Sentai GoRanger (Secret Squadron Five Ranger),
    Aired from 1975-1977. 84 episodes.

    - J.A.K.Q. Dengekitai (J.A.K.Q. Blitzkrieg Squad)
    Aired in 1977. 35 episodes.

    - Battle Fever J
    Aired in 1979. 52 episodes.

    - Denshi Sentai Denjiman (Electronic Squadron Denjiman)
    Aired in 1980. 51 episodes.

    - Taiyou Sentai Sun Vulcan (Solar Squadron Sun Vulcan)
    Aired in 1981. 50 episodes.

    - Dai Sentai Goggle V (Great Squadron Goggle Five)
    Aired in 1982. 50 episodes.

    - Kagaku Sentai Dynaman (Science Squadron Dynaman)
    Aired in 1983. 51 episodes.

    - Choudenshi Bioman (Super Electronic Bioman)
    Aired in 1984. 51 episodes.

    - Dengeki Sentai Changeman (Blitzkrieg Squadron Changeman)
    Aired in 1985. 55 episodes.

    - Choushinsei Flashman (Supernova Flashman)
    Aired in 1986. 50 episodes.

    - Hikari Sentai Maskman (Light Squadron Maskman)
    Aired in 1987. 51 episodes.

    - Choujuu Sentai Liveman (Super-Beast Squadron Liveman)
    Aired in 1988. 49 episodes.

    - Kousoku Sentai TurboRanger (High-Speed Squadron Turbo Ranger)
    Aired in 1989. 51 episodes.

    - Chikyuu Sentai Fiveman (Earth Squadron Fiveman)
    Aired in 1990. 48 episodes.

    - Choujin Sentai Jetman (Birdman Squadron Jetman)
    Aired in 1991. 51 episodes.

    - Kyouryuu Sentai ZyuRanger (Dinosaur Squadron Beast Ranger)
    Aired in 1992. 50 episodes.

    - Gosei Sentai DaiRanger (Five-Star Squadron Great Ranger)
    Aired in 1993. 50 episodes.

    - Ninja Sentai KakuRanger (Ninja Squadron Hidden Ranger)
    Aired in 1994. 53 episodes.

    - Chouriki Sentai OhRanger (Super-Power Squadron Overtech Hardware Ranger)
    Aired in 1995. 48 episodes.

    - Gekisou Sentai CarRanger (Racing Squadron Car Ranger)
    Aired in 1996. 48 episodes.

    - Denji Sentai MegaRanger (Electromagnetic Squadron Mega Ranger)
    Aired in 1997. 51 episodes.

    - Seijuu Sentai Gingaman (Star-Beast Squadron Milky Way Man)
    Aired in 1998. 50 episodes.

    - Kyuukyuu Sentai GoGo-V (Rescue Squadron GoGo V)
    Aired in 1999. 50 episodes.

    - Mirai Sentai TimeRanger (Future Squadron Time Ranger)
    Aired in 2000. 51 episodes.

    - Hyakujuu Sentai GaoRanger (100 Beast Squadron Growl Ranger)
    Aired in 2001. 51 episodes.

    - Ninpuu Sentai Hurricanger (Stealth-Wind Squadron Hurricane Ranger)
    Aired in 2002. 51 episodes.

    - Bakuryuu Sentai AbaRanger (Blastasaur Squadron Outburst Ranger)
    Aired in 2003. 50 episodes.

    - Tokusou Sentai DekaRanger (Special Investigation Squadron Detective Ranger)
    Aired in 2004. 50 episodes.

    - Mahou Sentai MagiRanger (Magic Squadron Magic Ranger)
    Aired in 2005. 49 episodes.

    - GoGo Sentai Boukenger (Rumbling Squadron Adventure Ranger)
    Aired in 2006. 49 episodes.

    - JÅ«ken Sentai GekiRanger (Beast-Fist Squadron Fierce Ranger)
    Aired in 2007. 49 episodes.

    - Engine Sentai Go-Onger (Engine Squadron Go-On Ranger)
    Aired in 2008. 50 episodes.

    - Samurai Sentai Shinkenger (Samurai Squadron Shinkenger)
    Aired in 2009. 49 episodes.

    - Tensou Sentai Goseiger (Heavenly Armament Squadron Goseiger)
    Aired in 2010. 50 episodes.

    - Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger (Pirate Squadron Ranger)
    Aired in 2011. 51 episodes. - Tokumei Sentai Go-Busters (Special Mission Squadron Go-Busters)
    Aired in 2012. 50 episodes. - Zyuden Sentai Kyoryuger (Electrobeast Squadron Dinosaurger)
    Aired in 2013. 48 episodes. moreless
  • 107
    Kojak

    Kojak

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    CBS (ended 1990)
    An independent-minded police detective solves crimes on the streets of New York City. Lt. Theo Kojak is a bald, lollipop-sucking detective also known for his trademark catch-phrase, "Who Loves Ya, Baby?" His boss is Capt. Frank McNeil, with whom Kojak has a lot in common, who was later promoted to Chief of Detectives. His most trusted assistants are Det. Bobby Crocker and Det. Stavros.moreless
  • 108
    The Incredible Hulk

    The Incredible Hulk

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    CBS (ended 1982)
    Dr. David Banner was a research scientist trying to find a way to tap into the hidden strength that all humans possess. Then, one night in his labratory, an experiment went wrong, causing him to be overexposed to gamma radiation. Now, whenever angered or distressed, the mild-mannered scientist finds himself transforming into a powerful seven-foot green creature known as The Incredible Hulk. The creature is guided by David's personality, dealing with whatever distresses David. But unfortunately, David has no control over the creature's actions. Nor can he remember what he had done during his Hulkish states. He travels around the country in search of a cure, while taking various odd jobs under different aliases. During this odyssey, he tries to avoid the pursuit of investigative reporter Jack McGee, who suspects the Hulk of murder, and who is determined to discover the creature's true identity.moreless
  • 109
    Wonder Woman

    Wonder Woman

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    CBS (ended 1979)
    This is the third attempt at bringing Wonder Woman to the small screen. The first was an unaired pilot from the 1960's and the next was an unsuccessful mid 1970's movie starring Cathy Lee Crosby as a blonde Wonder Woman! Finally, in 1975, the athletic and stunning Lynda Carter was perfectly cast as the amazonian princess who leaves the island of Themyscira to fight for justice in man's world. The first season took place during World War II with Wonder Woman fighting the Nazis. The Second season updated the Wonder Woman mythos to modern times and a different network. The series only lasted three seasons but proved to be a pop-cultural hit thanks to reruns.moreless
  • 110
    Lassie

    Lassie

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    CBS (ended 1973)
    Lassie currently airs on Discovery Kids @ 12:00/12:30 P.M. and 4:00/4:30 A.M. weekdays. Awards & Nominations 1959 - Emmy Awards - Nominated for Best Actress in a Leading Role (Continuing Character) in a Dramatic Series - to June Lockhart 1956 - Emmy Awards - Won Best Children's Series 1955 - Emmy Awards - Won Best Children's Seriesmoreless
  • 111
    Monday Night Football

    Monday Night Football

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    ESPN
    "Monday Night Football really got on the air because of Pete Rozelle," recalls former producer Don Ohlmeyer. Indeed, it was Rozelle's reputation for public relations and marketing that created a prime-time venue for the National Football League. The prototypes for Monday Night Football were those annual Monday night games staged from 1966 to 1969 inclusive on CBS. St. Louis hosted three of them, and it seemed natural for the NFL to make Monday night their regular turf. The only trouble was, Rozelle couldn't get a network to agree.
    .
    CBS did not want to lose Gunsmoke. NBC had Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In, TV's highest-rated show the past two years. Even ABC, floundering in third place in the ratings, was unsure. Rozelle then threatened to put the Monday night package in syndication via the Hughes Television Service. So ABC bought in. NFL owners themselves weren't keen on Monday Night Football. Some thought the gates would be dormant. But then-Cleveland Browns owner Art Modell, who knew a thing or two about marketing himself, agreed to host the first MNF game. He asked that the Browns face the Jets to maximize ABC's first-night audience. The result was a smashing success.
    .
    For 36 years, Monday Night Football would air on ABC. Don Meredith and Howard Cosell were, along with Keith Jackson, part of the original team that started in 1970. After Jackson returned full-time to ABC's college football broadcasts, the network hired Frank Gifford away from CBS. From there, Monday Night Football began its most memorable years. It got ratings thanks to the wide appeal that Cosell, Meredith, and Gifford collectively garnered. Except for a shift in the mid-70s that sent Meredith briefly to another network, ABC played a strong football card for twelve years.
    .
    The separate departures of Meredith and Cosell left the Monday Night Football booth in a shaky transition period during the mid-80s. Though they sometimes got it right on the field, with the high-water mark being Miami's romping of the eventual Super Bowl champion Chicago Bears in 1985, it was plain that the booth could not work with three ex-players (what Howard Cosell had labeled "jockocracy"). The likes of Fred Williamson, O.J. Simpson, and Joe Namath were quickly disposed. The second-most-stable team was assembled in 1986, when veteran ABC sportscaster Al Michaels joined Gifford. Rounding out the booth was future Hall of Fame offensive lineman Dan Dierdorf. They would share more than a decade of prime time football coverage, including three Super Bowls.
    .
    For all its considerable charm and novelty, one thing Monday Night Football did not achieve was a proper farewell to Frank Gifford. After the 1997 season, the booth welcomed the recently-retired Bengals quarterback Boomer Esiason. Gifford was cramped in a studio to introduce pregame and halftime stories for the 1998 season. Neither change worked, as Gifford was out of ABC after one year and Boomer Esiason agreed to a contract settlement in 2000. The next two years were the least successful. Joining Al Michaels was ABC college football analyst Dan Fouts and Dennis Miller. Even though their first season had an abundance of nail-biters (witness the Jets' Midnight Miracle over the Dolphins), the new recruits were unable to get in focus. Miller in particular was over-rehearsed in the hours leading up to a broadcast. Both he and Fouts were out of the booth after January 7, 2002.
    .
    ABC needed a lift for the show, and thought they had it when John Madden (who had recanted on his offer to join ABC in 1994) came over from another network. Monday Night Football went from planes to buses for the next four years. Again, though, the players were meant to be bigger stars than Madden or Michaels. Sometimes it showed, such as the Colts' stunning comeback over the defending World Champion Buccaneers in 2003. But in all honesty, the hundred forces that had emerged after 1970 to compete with Monday Night Football, were collectively getting the better of ABC. Thus, on April 18, 2005, a new eight-year contract sent Monday Night Football to ABC's adopted sister network, ESPN.moreless
  • 112
    The Six Million Dollar Man

    The Six Million Dollar Man

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    ABC (ended 1978)
    "Steve Austin, astronaut, a man barely alive. Gentlemen, we can rebuild him, we have the technology. We have the capability to make the worlds first Bionic man. Steve Austin will be that man. Better than he was before. Better. Stronger. Faster." This series chronicles the adventures of Steve Austin, cybernetically enhanced astronaut turned secret agent employed by the OSI under the command of Oscar Goldman and supervised by the scientist who created his cybernetics, Rudy Wells. Steve uses the superior strength and speed provided by his bionic arm and legs, and the enhanced vision provided by his artificial eye, to fight enemy agents, aliens, mad scientists, and a wide vareity of other villains.moreless
  • 113
    NFL on CBS

    NFL on CBS

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    CBS
    Starting in 1956, CBS cobbled together ten regional networks to televise NFL games across America. Eleven of the 12 teams - all but Cleveland - signed on with CBS. For 38 consecutive years, CBS televised NFL games through the 1970 season and the National Football Conference after the merger. After the 1993 season, FOX won the rights to the NFC and NBC continued with the American Football Conference. When NBC's contract expired, CBS won the rights to televise AFC games.
    .
    With the 2009 season, the NFL on CBS celebrated 50 seasons on the air. The milestone 5,000th telecast came on the afternoon of November 28, 2010 in a Week 12 game between the Miami Dolphins and the Oakland Raiders.moreless
  • 114
    The Name of the Game

    The Name of the Game

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    The Name Of The Game was a rotating series featuring Gene Barry as Glenn Howard, CEO of Howard Publications and managing director of Fame magazine; Robert Stack as Dan Farrell, a writer for Crime magazine; and Tony Franciosa as Jeff Dillon, writer for People magazine.moreless
  • 115
    Ironside

    Ironside

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Welcome to the Ironside guide at TV.com. When an assassin's bullet confines him to a wheelchair for life ending his career as Chief of Detectives, Robert T. Ironside becomes a consultant to the police department. Detective Sergeant Ed Brown and policewoman Eve Whitfield join with him to crack varied and fascinating cases. Ex-con Mark Sanger is employed by the chief as home help but eventually becomes a fully fledged member of the team also. Officer Whitfield leaves after 4 years service, and is replaced by Officer Fran Belding. If you have any information about this series, feel free to contribute it. Thanks.moreless
  • 116
    Masterpiece Theatre

    Masterpiece Theatre

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    PBS
    Welcome to the Masterpiece Theatre guide at TV.com.

    On the air since 1971, in its early days the show consisted entirely of British drama productions, more than half of them from the BBC. Since the year 2000, some classic productions from the American Collection have also been included, but the bulk of the show still comes from the UK.

    Masterpiece Theatre has won thirty Primetime Emmy Awards, as well as many other awards. To buy episodes of Masterpiece Theatre on DVD, visit its online store.moreless
  • 117
    Eight is Enough

    Eight is Enough

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    ABC (ended 1981)
    Based on the book by Thomas Braden, this family drama chronicles the lives of the Bradford family: the father Tom, who worked as a columnist for a Sacramento newspaper); the mother Joan; and their eight children: David, Mary, Joanie, Susan, Nancy, Elizabeth, Tommy, and Nicholas.

    As anyone from a large family can tell you, get these many different people – related or not – under the same roof, and chaos will certainly ensue. Enter in all their relationships, school, and work problems, and you can guarantee something is always going haywire in the Bradford home.

    Diana Hyland died during season one and her character was "sent away" .So in season two, Tom married Abby, a school teacher.

    In season four, two of the Bradford children got married: David to Janet; and Susan to Merle, a baseball player. In France the show is known as Huit, ça suffit !.
    In Italy it was known as La famiglia Bradford ("The Bradford Family") on Channel One, but titled Otto Bastano on Channel Four.moreless
  • 118
    Death Valley Days

    Death Valley Days

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    (ended 1975)
    A series of stories, all based in fact, revolving around the legends of Death Valley, California where borax was mined. Mostly human interest stories about the life in Death Valley and the surrounding area in the late 1800's.moreless
  • 119
    The Electric Company 1970s

    The Electric Company 1970s

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    PBS (ended 1977)
    On the heels of its fabulously successful Sesame Street, the Children's Television Workshop (CTW) created The Electric Company. With its roots in Motown Sound, Broadway and Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, The Electric Company drew attention for six years as the most popular instructional television show. It would win an Emmy for Outstanding Children's Series, and its soundtrack album earned a Grammy. Targeting children ages 6 through 10, The Electric Company aimed to teach basic reading and grammar skills to the young viewers. The show's cast of skit players helped teach these concepts through the use of skits, songs, cartoon and blackout segments and regular features; all of them revolved around sound clusters (e.g., sh-, -ly, -oo-), contractions, punctuation marks, etc. The series provided material for elementary schools, as CTW published a biweekly TEC Teacher's Guide detailing program contents. Quickly, the cast members began to establish themselves with various personas: • Skip Hinnant (who had played Schroeder in the off-Broadway production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown) had one of the best known characters: Fargo North, Decoder. Early in the run, this Peter Sellers knock-off interpreted messages that people gave to him when they couldn't understand what had been written. • The show also made Morgan Freeman. He created Easy Reader, the cool dude who loved reading anything he could get his hands on. Freeman also played radio disc jockey Mel Mounds, who usually introduced The Short Circus tunes (see below). • Rita Moreno created her tagline, "Hey You Guys!", while playing Millie, the Milkman's helper. She put the same fire into playing Otto the Director, who fumed as her actors didn't read their lines properly. • Judy Graubart, alumnus of The Second City in Chicago, became Jennifer of the Jungle, teaching bits of phonetics to her friend Paul the Gorilla. • And who can forget J. Arthur Crank? Jimmy Boyd (B. 1939) created the character, strictly as a voice on a telephone during the first season. In all future years, Crank was seen as that bad-tempered loud dresser. Complimenting the adults in the cast was The Short Circus, a group of five teenaged performers usually involved in songs or dances. Members of The Short Circus drew names from a hat to determine what would be their character name. While the Short Circus changed its talents from one season to the next, they did keep one member constant: June Angela. The show also set itself apart with the cloud sets by Nat Mongioi (which members of the cast called "Limbo Land"), cool music by the late Joe Raposo and others, unique sound effects Dick Maitland pinned to punctuation marks, and the high-tech computer animation. The logo above can only suggest these elements, which seemed to represent the New Era back in the 1970s. Among the most popular of the regular features was Spiderman, a live-action segment added during the series' fourth season. The Spiderman segments (for which there were about two dozen or so made) featured The Electric Company cast as various characters. Beginning in 1972, there was also The Adventures of Letterman cartoon series. The evil Spell Binder would cause trouble by using his magic wand, replacing key letters to make the worse of situations (e.g.: Train into Rain). Then Letterman would take the letter(s) off his varsity sweater and correct the hazard. Muppet characters from Sesame Street (including Big Bird, Oscar the Grouch and Grover) also visited on occasion through the years. A total of 780 episodes of The Electric Company aired from 1971 to 1977 on PBS; reruns of the final two seasons aired through the fall of 1985. Programs always ended with one of its cast members stating: The Electric Company gets its power from The Children's Television Workshop. This was followed by a superimposed caption: The Electric Company is a trademark and service mark of the Children's Television Workshop. © Copyright Children's Television Workshop 1971 to 1977 In 1972, CTW began issuing The Electric Company magazine. Appropriately enough, the mag contained feature articles, games and other activities featuring members of the show's cast. It was published until the late-1980s, when replaced with a magazine called Kid City. A sister magazine, Spidey Super Stories (also issued and endorsed by The Electric Company's producers) contained children's reading level-versions of the web slinger's battles with his arch-enemies plus comic strip versions of the The Electric Company Spiderman segments. Spidey Super Stories were published from October 1974 to January 1982. Sixty-five episodes of The Electric Company from various seasons – a good share from the 1972-1973 and 1973-1974 seasons – began airing on Nickelodeon's new Noggin network in the spring of 1999 (kicked off with a two-hour retrospective of the show on TV Land, another Nickelodeon sister network). The shows were edited slightly, removing all program numbers and show-ending teases (see Notes within Show 131). Also for the Noggin run, CTW gave credit to Marvel Comics, which had never received a copyright notice on the original run. Thus all episodes from Seasons 4 to 6 had their copyrights redisplayed: The Electric Company is a trademark and service mark of the Children's Television Workshop. © Copyright Children's Television Workshop 1974 to 1976 The use of the character Spiderman was provided as a courtesy to the Children's Television Workshop by Marvel Comics Group. © Copyright Marvel Comics Group 1974 to 1976 At first, Noggin aired The Electric Company during several daytime and overnight time slots seven days a week. By the time CTW was renamed Sesame Workshop in 2000, however, the show's timeslots were downgraded to late-nights and then, in 2002, only a couple of weekend overnight airings. In early 2003, with the value of Sesame Workshop's interest in Noggin even less (if not zero), The Electric Company was pulled from Noggin's schedule altogether. (Note: Classic episodes of Sesame Street, which were shown under the title Sesame Street Unpaved, had also been a part of Noggin's schedule. Noggin had shown 65 classic episodes (originally airing between 1969 to 1986) of the series. Like The Electric Company, Sesame Street Unpaved had originally aired weekdays before being placed in downgraded timeslots (eventually weekend overnights). Both shows had attracted primarily adults (who had watched the show as children) and college-aged fans, and both shows were too dated for their intended childhood audience. Noggin underwent a total personality change beginning April 1, 2002, placing more emphasis on original programming (in addition to airing reruns of Nickelodeon kiddie shows). The general effect of removing The Electric Company from the airwaves, has not been a pleasant one for American society. Some people believe Sesame Workshop discusses The Electric Company only when lowering the wrecker's ball on those who have violated their copyrights. (To this day, The Electric Company™ and the logo are trademarks and service marks of Sesame Workshop, © 1971-1977.) Though it appears Sesame Workshop chooses not to live in the past, it has been digitizing segments from all its old shows in preparation for DVD releases. The first DVD of The Electric Company is scheduled for release in 2006. (This is the result of an independent campaign for a TEC DVD release; see below.) The Electric Company will always be remembered by its fans as an entertaining series which taught children to read. Elementary classroom teachers regularly scheduled their days so their students could watch the show, and reading scores increased as a result of in-class and home viewing. Hey You Guys! petersmith among them We're gonna turn it on We're gonna bring you the power We're gonna light up The dark of night Like the brightest day In a whole new way We're gonna turn it on We're gonna bring you the power It's coming down the line Strong as it can be Through the courtesy Of The Electric Company™ from The Electric Company Theme Music and Lyrics by Joe Raposo © 1971 Jonico Musicmoreless
  • 120
    Green Acres

    Green Acres

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    Successful New York lawyer Oliver Wendell Douglas gives up the rat race to fulfill his dream: living the life of the traditional American farmer. Fighting the move to rural life is his glamorous, boa-wearing, city-loving wife, Lisa. This quaint premise, however, doesn't begin to capture the screwball absurdity of Green Acres. After a few episodes that were somewhat rooted in reality, the series' true oddness started to bloom. The characters see the opening credits as they appear on screen (or on chicken eggs); they talk with baseball-playing pigs who become movie stars; fife music accompanies Oliver's patriotic speeches and is heard by everyone but him; a full-sized Eiffel tower is built on the Douglases' lawn. Hooterville is clearly operating in its own bizarre universe where Oliver is the only normal, reasonable person--and that's questionable at times. The tiny town revolves around Sam Drucker's General Store, where Sam acts as shopkeeper, postmaster, justice of the peace and publisher of the "Hooterville World Guardian". He's one of the more level-headed residents of the valley, but that's relative. The other locals are considerable more bizarre and are a constant frustration to Oliver. Hank Kimball, the county agricultural agent, is a prime example. His short-term memory is so poor he regularly forgets what he's talking about mid-sentence. Fellow farmer Fred Ziffel is an elderly overalls-wearing man who, with his wife Doris, treats their pig Arnold like an actual child. Arnold attends school, reads, writes, skates, and speaks several languages (though they all sound like oinking). Con man Eustace Haney, who sold Oliver his dump of a farm, is always trying to fleece someone out of their cash. Apparently possessing ESP, he shows up outside of Oliver's door with whatever he and Lisa have just been discussing. The Douglases' farmhand, Eb, lives in their barn and considers Oliver and Lisa to be his parents. Lisa, a stylish Hungarian woman who Oliver met during the war, is hardly cut out for domestic life. Wearing ostrich feathers and diamonds around the farm, she can only cook "hotscakes" (badly) and her mangling of the English language is impressive. Matt Groening once accurately described Green Acres as "Oliver Douglas in hell". All he wants to do is farm, but the constant interruptions from the loony locals, the endless double-talk, the ambitious pig all conspire to make it impossible. Oliver earns his reputation as a "hothead" as his face turns red and he bellows about the latest aggravation.
    Green Acres
    began when CBS handed Paul Henning, the very successful producer of The Beverly Hillbillies and Petticoat Junctionmoreless
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