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    Poldark

    Poldark

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    BBC (ended 1977)
    Welcome to the Poldark guide at TV.com. This old British show from the 1970s is a period piece based on Winston Graham's historical novels of 18th century Cornwall. Our hero is an unusual English gentleman called Captain Ross Poldark, who comes home from the War of American Independence to find his sweetheart Elizabeth about to marry his cousin Francis Poldark. Ross sinks into a deep depression. Short of money, he tries mining and other enterprises to make his fortune, nearly always having to fight the upstart George Warleggan - an old enemy who also has designs on Elizabeth. But the big love story of the series is unexpected. While Ross is pining for Elizabeth, he rescues an urchin called Demelza from her dreadful family, and she falls in love with him. Ross only slowly comes to see Demelza as a possible mate. The drama is all played out amid the dramatic scenery of the Cornish coast-line, where smugglers, ship-wreckers, tin-miners and swindlers of various kinds ply their trades. All twenty-nine episodes are now available on DVD.moreless
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    The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson

    The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson

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    NBC (ended 1992)
    Six months after Jack Paar made a stormy departure from "The Tonight Show" (over jokes about Communism, among other issues) and viewers enduring a succession of "substitute" hosts (and an ill-fated attempt at a magazine-type show), NBC (and middle America) finally got the comedian they were waiting for. Johnny Carson – who had honed his craft on radio and daytime television, and to that point was best known as host of Who Do You Trust – made his debut as host of "The Tonight Show" on October 1, 1962. Thus began a love affair with America that lasted 30 years, not only making Carson wealthy and powerful, but earning him the title, "King of Late Night." It started out shaky. NBC built Carson a cheap set on the sixth floor of 30 Rockefeller Center, not thinking the show would last. Ed McMahon was less confident; he still lived in Philadelphia and commuted for the next three years. In 1962, "Tonight" began at 11:15 pm ET and lasted 105 minutes. By then, most NBC affiliates had inflated their late-evening newscasts to half an hour. It meant that, unless viewers tuned in on the NBC owned-and-operated stations in New York, Washington, DC, Chicago, Philadelphia, or Los Angeles, chances are they missed Carson's monologue. NBC quickly moved the start time of Johnny's show to 11:30 pm ET to ensure everyone could see the best part of his domain. In 1972, the show moved from New York to NBC's West Coast headquarters, thus setting up countless gags about "beautiful downtown Burbank." For a number of years, NBC reran "Tonight" on weekends at 11:30 pm ET. These reruns, of course, didn't score nearly the ratings as the originals maintained. By the end of 1974, Carson told NBC to turn their late weekends to another program. NBC hired a young Canadian performer and writer named Lorne Michaels to develop (what would quickly become) the "Tonight" antithesis -- Saturday Night Live. Carson became the man with whom millions of Americans ended their day with a relatively simple formula: an opening monologue of topical (sometimes corny) humor. Johnny's stock in trade became his down-home, glib sense of humor and his natural wit. He possessed the knack of being equal parts L.A. hip and Midwest backward. However, he never mocked people or resorted to mean-spirited or cheap, off-color jokes; instead, he often poked fun at human nature and events of the day in such a way that made America know it was OK to laugh at themselves. The Carson Monologue became "must see TV," and to miss a night was leave one's self less than "in the know" at the water cooler the following day. On one occasion, a Carson joke about toilet paper shortage actually led to hoarding of the product by thousands of consumers. Following the monologue, viewers saw either a "desk bit" between Carson and McMahon, or a more elaborate, produced skit. Then, interviews and performances by a wide range of celebrities followed (some reports have Johnny's guest list at more than 20,000). Carson was often at his best while interviewing the "everyday" person, especially young children. Some of the notable skits and features: • Carnac the Magnificent – Debuting in 1964, Carson (wearing a jeweled and feathered turban) would "divine" answers to questions from "hermetically sealed" envelopes, a standard gag from Vaudeville. Example: "The answer is...Chicken teriyaki! The question..."What is the name of the last surviving Japanese kamikaze pilot?" • The Mighty Carson Art Players – Starting in 1967, this catch-all title featured parodies of movies, TV shows and commercials. Classic skits included a tongue-twisting take-off on Dragnet (1968, with Jack Webb); commercial parodies of E.F. Hutton (with a deceased Carson rising from a casket to "my broker is E.F. Hutton..."), American Express (with Carson as Karl Malden), Energizer Batteries (Carson as Robert Conrad), and various diarrhea commercial take-offs. Also under the "Mighty Carson" umbrella was the Tea Time Movie sketch, with Carson playing Art Fern, an oily afternoon movie host and commercial huckster. These sketches were full of double entendre humor, first featuring busty Carol Wayne as the straight foil, "the Matinee Lady." Following Wayne's drowning death in 1985, Teresa Ganzel was added. Other classic moments included Carson as President Reagan (and actor Fred Holliday) in a hilarious "Who's On First?"-style routine, and a duet with Julio Iglesias ("To All The Girls I've Loved Before"), with Carson giving a convincing Willie Nelson impersonation. • Floyd R. Turbo – The super-patriot who gave over-the-top editorials. Other memorable moments: • Falsetto-singer and ukulele player Tiny Tim on-air marriage to Miss Vicki (Vicki Budinger) on December 17, 1969. • Ed Ames infamous tomahawk throw demo, striking the outlined target squarely in the crotch. • The marmoset who relieved itself while poking around at Carson's head; plus other animals (brought on by frequent guests Joan Embery and Jim Fowler) who refused to behave or were just being themselves. • Potato chip collector Myrtle Young, who momentarily thinks Johnny has eaten one of her prized chips. Among the performers who owe (at least part) of the beginning of their careers to Carson: Joan Rivers, Roseanne Barr, Drew Carey, Jay Leno, David Letterman, Eddie Murphy, Jerry Seinfeld and Garry Shandling, plus many others. Ironically, Letterman (a frequent "Tonight" guest host in the late 1970's) was Carson's first choice as his successor. Leno, however, had already been given the seat as "permanent guest host," following Carson's professional breakup with Joan Rivers (who had joined the up and coming FOX Network to do her own late night show in 1986.) Leno, though seen by some at NBC as "too ethnic looking," had the favor of NBC's West Coast executives, and was chosen over Letterman, whom NBC West saw as "too cranky and edgy" to replace the mild-mannered Carson. This was perceived as a final snub to Carson, and prompted Letterman to defect to CBS, and compete head to head against the show he'd always wanted to host. The entire "Tonight" endgame saga would be the subject of Bill Carter's book The Late Shift: Letterman, Leno & the Network Battle for the Night (later turned into an HBO film, with Rich Little as Johnny). Carson's 30-year ride was hardly without its more tenuous moments, thanks to several contract disputes and his well-publicized failed marriages (he was thrice divorced during his run on the show). Carson's "alimony payment" jokes would become a staple of the show. Following much protracted negotiation (including talk of his leaving "Tonight"), Carson signed a new contract with NBC in 1980. Three stipulations in the deal: 1) "Tonight" was reduced from 90 minutes to 60; 2) Carson would dictate what kind of show NBC could run at 12:30 am ET. This meant replacing Tom Snyder's Tomorrow show with from Carson's stable. 3) Carson Productions was formed. Among its most heralded works was the show that followed "Tonight" -- Late Night with David Letterman. Carson Productions' other gift to NBC was a series of specials called Television's Greatest Commercials, hosted by Ed McMahon. McMahon was also a victim of a one-shot deal called Johnny Carson's Greatest Practical Jokes, in which Johnny had loaded the trunk of Ed's car with office equipment and taped Ed failing to get past NBC Security (and a guard named Carson). Both of these specials would merge with Dick Clark's running TV Censored Bloopers in January 1984, becoming TV's Bloopers & Practical Jokes. In 1983, Carson Productions produced and distributed "Carson's Comedy Classics," a somewhat low-budget, 30 minute repackaging of "Tonight" clips, culled mainly from the years 1972-1982. Carson's lock on late night came into question in the late 1980's, likely precipitated by two events: the debut of The Arsenio Hall Show in 1989, and Dana Carvey doing a less-than-loving portrayal (with Phil Hartman as a one-note Ed McMahon) of Carson on Saturday Night Live. Carvey's "Johnny" was basically a dinosaur -- a relic clueless of pop culture and mired in "unhipness." In one of the more scathing takes, Carvey presented Carson as "Carsenio," giving his Johnny a wedge cut and Arsenio-styled suit. These less-than-flattening portrayals of Carson on SNL were seen by some as NBC giving tacit approval to the move to push Johnny out. Carson, during his last show, in thanking Doc and the band, would lament TV's loss of the "last big swing band," saying, "To say that this band is not 'hip' is to not know the meaning of the word." In 1991, as Carson was starting his 29th year, the "King of Late Night" announced in his usual no-big-deal style that he was retiring, expressing a desire to leave the show while still in his prime. His second-to-last show on May 21, 1992 featured just two guests: Robin Williams and Bette Midler, with Midler serenading Carson with "One for My Baby," a teary-eyed Carson taking in the moment. The final show on May 22, 1992 was a quiet and contemplative retrospective, featuring "a day in the life" on the Tonight Show set, and a tribute to his late son, Rick (who was killed in a car crash the previous June). Alone on a stool, in front of the familiar curtain, a tearful Carson bade his audience "a heartfelt good night," thus ending not only a show, but an era of television. With very few exceptions, Carson's "Tonight" departure was the last most people saw of their beloved late-night TV comic. Most notably: a voice appearance as himself on The Simpsons episode, 'Krusty Gets Kancelled,' and a pair of appearances on Late Show with David Letterman. Just prior to Carson's death, it was revealed that Johnny would occasionally give Dave an idea or two for his monologue, thus cementing the notion that Carson saw Letterman as his true late night heir. When Johnny Carson died on January 23, 2005, America mourned the passing of a late-night legend. Jay Leno devoted his January 24, 2005 show to his predecessor (though it should be noted, Leno read a prepared "tribute" from cue cards). On the show were Ed McMahon, Drew Carey and Carson's close friends Bob Newhart and Don Rickles, all providing their remembrances. Letterman's first new show following Carson's death featured longtime "Tonight" executive producer Peter Lassally and a performance of "Here's That Rainy Day" -- one of Johnny's favorites -- by bandleader Doc Severinsen, with NBC Orchestra mates Tommy Newsom and Ed Shaughnessy. Thanks to TV Tome contributors Brian Rathjen & doppelgänger.moreless
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    Mind Your Language

    Mind Your Language

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    ITV (ended 1986)
    Barry Evans stars as Teacher Jeremy Brown who is attempting to teach English to a class of mixed nationality students. The first series had 13 episodes and was shown from December 1977 to March 1978. The second series had only 8 episodes and was shown from October 1978 to November 1978. The third series of 8 episodes was shown from October 1979 to December 1979. Seven years later in 1986 an independently produced fourth series of 13 episodes of Mind Your Language was shown.moreless
  • 124
    The Bob Newhart Show

    The Bob Newhart Show

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    CBS (ended 1978)
    Comedian Bob Newhart plays Dr. Robert Hartley, a clinical psychologist living in Chicago with his wife Emily, an elementary schoolteacher. His across-the-hallway neighbor, Howard Borden, is a divorced airline navigator. One of Bob's best friends is Dr. Jerry Robinson, an orthodontist who works on the same floor as Bob. There's also Bob's and Jerry's receptionist Carol Kester, as well as Bob's many clients, including Elliot Carlin, Lillian Bakerman, Emil Peterson and Victor Gianelli.

    The Bob Newhart Show was part of CBS' highly successful Saturday night lineup which also featured The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Carol Burnett Show and All in the Family. Another connection to The Mary Tyler Moore Show was that The Bob Newhart Show was produced by the same team that made that series a success.

    First Telecast: September 16, 1972 Last Telecast: April 1, 1978

    Episodes: 142 Color Episodes, 1 Special & 1 Unaired Pilot

    CBS Broadcast History September 1972-October 1976----Saturdays----9:30 p.m November 1976-September 1977----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. September 1977-April 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. June 1978-September 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. Characters: Stars: Dr. Robert Anthony "Bob" Hartley - A Clinical Psychologist who grew up in the Chicago area with an easy-going father and a manipulative, talkative mother. Bob attended Loyola University, where his best friend was Cliff "The Peeper" Murdock. Bob's office is in downtown Chicago, and he and his wife, Emily, live in a high-rise twenty minutes from his office. He often takes the train to work, but may take his car, especially if one of his groups has a session in the evening. Late in the show's run Bob publishes a book and is away for several episodes doing a book tour. Emily Joyce Hartley - Bob's wife, A schoolteacher. Emily comes from an expressive, gregarious family from the Seattle area. She married Bob after both had begun their careers, and they celebrate only their third anniversary during the show's first season. After working as a teacher for several years, Emily becomes principal, giving her a well-respected position.

    Howard Mark Borden - Next door neighbor, a divorced airplane navigator. For much of the series Howard's identity is shaped by his divorce. He is helpless around the house and depends on Emily and Bob for almost everything. He is a bit of a "swinger," dating stewardesses quite regularly, but deep-down he is a lonely soul. A bright spot in his life is his son, Howie. For a time Howard is engaged to Bob's sister, Ellen. Dr. Jerome "Jerry" Robinson - An Orthodontist whose office is near Bob's. Jerry was raised in an orphanage and, for the most part, is happy with shallow romantic relationships. He is a good sounding board for Bob, as Bob is for Jerry.

    Carol Kester Bondurant - The receptionist for all the doctor's on the floor where Bob has his office. After being overweight for much of her young life in Iowa, Carol lost over 100 pounds, then started a new life in Chicago. Carol always longed for Mr. Right until she met him in Larry Bondurant. They married after a very short courtship. Carol is an excellent receptionist, but sometimes longs for more meaning in her job. Thankfully, Bob is always ready to listen to her problems. Ellen Inez Hartley (1974-1976) - Bob's sister and Howard's girlfriend. Ellen is a part-time reporter, picking up any story she can until she can establish her career. Bob's Group Regulars: Elliot Carlin - The insecure, hostile patient Victor Gianelli - The hostile, insensitive patient Emil Peterson - The hen-pecked patient Lillian Bakerman - The insecure, motherly patient Michelle Nardo - The insecure, overweight patient Ed Herd - The timid door-to-door salesman patient. Other Doctors at the Timpau Medical Arts Building: Dr. Bernie Tupperman - The Urologist Dr. Phillip Newman - The ego-centric Plastic Surgeonmoreless
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    The Benny Hill Show

    The Benny Hill Show

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    ITV (ended 1989)
    This guide strives to be as complete a resource as possible for the third TV series to bear Benny Hill's name in the title, which ran on Thames Television (ITV) from 1969-1989, and has appeared around the world in countless formats and re-edits ever since.

    This is a guide to the original hour-long version.

    In America, the show was usually presented in a specially-edited half-hour format, which ran for a total of 111 editions (although Comedy Central did screen the hour-long format in the early-to-mid '90's, albeit with sections edited out, typically the musical guest or dance numbers). 30-minute repeats (not the same as were made for the American market) often aired in Britain when the show was "between seasons."

    Comedy Central aired the original hour-long format for Shows 32 - 58 (except for Show 40). Also, USA Network aired the shows in the original hour-long format in the late '80s/early '90s. At least Shows 54 - 58, possibly others, along with the independently-produced Benny Hill's World Tour: New York special (both channels had a few minutes cut for extra commercial time).

    In the U.S., the original hour-long shows have been issued on DVD (Region 1) under the umbrella title Benny Hill - Complete & Unadulterated. The first three sets were released with the subheading The Naughty Early Years, covering the years 1969-1971 (Shows 1-11, including three B&W episodes previously unseen in America), 1972-1974 (Shows 12-21) and 1975-1977 (Shows 22-31, plus his 1970 half-hour silent film Eddie in August). The final three sets bore the subheading The Hill's Angels Years, and covered the years 1978-1981 (Shows 32-41), 1982-1985 (Shows 42-50) and 1986-1989 (Shows 51-58). Also, the Golden Greats set that came out in 2001 (now out-of-print) included 6 episodes, Shows 46, 47, 50, 55, 56 and 58.

    In England, the original hour-long shows (complete with production slates and adcaps) have been released on DVD (Region 2) on a year-by-year basis, under the umbrella of The Benny Hill Annual, each set representing a different year. The 1970 set (Shows 3-6) contains the aforementioned Eddie in August, and the 1974 set (which only saw two new editions air, Shows 20 and 21) features his first two Thames specials from 1969. As of October 2006, the total releases go up to 1979 (Shows 34 and 35). The Benny Hill Annual sets from 1976 and 1977 onwards have adcaps but not VT slates.moreless
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    Eight is Enough

    Eight is Enough

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    ABC (ended 1981)
    Based on the book by Thomas Braden, this family drama chronicles the lives of the Bradford family: the father Tom, who worked as a columnist for a Sacramento newspaper); the mother Joan; and their eight children: David, Mary, Joanie, Susan, Nancy, Elizabeth, Tommy, and Nicholas.

    As anyone from a large family can tell you, get these many different people – related or not – under the same roof, and chaos will certainly ensue. Enter in all their relationships, school, and work problems, and you can guarantee something is always going haywire in the Bradford home.

    Diana Hyland died during season one and her character was "sent away" .So in season two, Tom married Abby, a school teacher.

    In season four, two of the Bradford children got married: David to Janet; and Susan to Merle, a baseball player. In France the show is known as Huit, ça suffit !.
    In Italy it was known as La famiglia Bradford ("The Bradford Family") on Channel One, but titled Otto Bastano on Channel Four.moreless
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    Buck Rogers in the 25th Century

    Buck Rogers in the 25th Century

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    In the year 1987, NASA launched the last of America's deep space probes. Aboard this compact starship a lone astronaut, Captain William "Buck" Rogers, was to experience cosmic forces beyond all comprehension. In a freak mishap, his life-support systems were frozen by temperatures beyond imagination. Ranger III was blown out of its plan trajectory into an orbit 1,000 times more vast, an orbit which was to return Buck Rogers to earth 500 years later.moreless
  • 128
    It Takes a Thief

    It Takes a Thief

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    Alexander Mundy was a cat burglar and professional thief who had style, class and talent. He made only one mistake -- getting caught. While serving a sentence in San Jobel Prison, he was contacted by representatives of the US Government spy agency, SIA. They offered to get him out if he would put his talents to work stealing for the government. Accepting the offer, he worked closely with an SIA department head, Noah Bain, who was his boss, aide, associate, friend and watchdog. During the second season he was now a free agent and his new SIA contact was Wallie Powers. Alexander's dad Alister became a semi-regular who was also a retired thief, from whom he had learned all his skills, and who occasionally teamed with his son on special jobs.
    First air date: January 9, 1968 Last air date: March 23, 1970 Original air time: Tuesday 8:30:00 pm (Eastern)moreless
  • 129
    Love, American Style

    Love, American Style

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    Love, American Style entertained viewers with stories about common people finding love in all walks of life. In this anthology series, each hour-long broadcast consisted of a group of vignettes, aired sequentially and separately and each with an introductory title card. Normally there were three or four vignettes to a show, although occasionally there were as few as one or as many as five. Short blackout skits would be shown in between segments whenever time allowed. The skits featured a recurring cast of players which included James Hampton, best known as Hannibal Dobbs from F Troop, and veteran character actor Stuart Margolin, brother of executive producer Arnold Margolin. The syndication rerun package consisted of 30-minute broadcasts that were edited from the original hour-long broadcasts, except for those which aired in the first half of season 2, which ran in a 30-minute time slot. The show never ranked above #25 in the Nielsen Ratings. Time slots that Love, American Style originally aired in: September 29, 1969 to January 12, 1970: Mondays, 10:00 to 11:00. January 23, 1970 to September 18, 1970: Fridays, 10:00 to 11:00. September 25, 1970 to January 15, 1971: Fridays, 9:30 to 10:00. January 22, 1971 to January 11, 1974: Fridays 10:00 to 11:00. In 1970, the show received a Golden Globe nomination for Best TV Show in a Musical or Comedy. It also won two Emmys for Charles Fox's musical compositions and was nominated for two more. The theme song was originally sung by the pop group, the Cowsills, but later replaced by an uptempo version, credited to the "Love American Style Singers." There was a short-lived revival in 1986 called The New Love, American Style, which aired on ABC's daytime schedule. One of the segments, "Love and the Happy Days," spawned a successful spin-off series, Happy Days.moreless
  • 130
    The Scooby Doo Films

    The Scooby Doo Films

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    Cartoon Network
    Four teens and a talking dog solve mysteries together.
  • 131
    Hallmark Hall Of Fame

    Hallmark Hall Of Fame

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    CBS
    Beginning in 1955, Hallmark Hall of Fame has been a series of specials (appearing four to eight times a year throughout the 1960s The Hallmark Hall of Fame was launched on Christmas Eve 1951, with the world premiere of Amahl and the Night Visitors, an original opera by Gian Carlo Menotti. Viewer response was so positive that encores were televised. The next original production, of William Shakespeare's Hamlet, was broadcast in April 1953. More people watched Hamlet that evening than had cumulatively seen it in all its live performances in the 350 years since it had been written. Founder of Hallmark - Joyce C. Hall, Aired on NBC.moreless
  • 132
    Land of the Giants

    Land of the Giants

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    This two-season series details the adventures of the three crew and four passengers of the sub-orbital spacecraft Spindrift. They are drawn through a space warp that crashes them onto a planet where everything is 12 times normal size. The castaways struggle to repair their damaged craft and somehow get back to Earth while being hunted by the totalitarian government that rule the planet. Despite the inherent scientific impossibilities (something 12 times as large would weigh 144 times as much, making it impossible for the "giants" to move), Land of the Giants, the last of Irwin Allen's four 60's s.f. programs, was highly-budgeted (about $250,000 an episode: a record for the time), features some decent characterization, and is another of the 60's shows to feature a competent African-American in a leading role.moreless
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    Here Come the Brides

    Here Come the Brides

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    The Bolt Brothers bring 100 prospective brides to Seattle in order to avoid losing their logging crew. Production Companies * Screen Gems Television Distributors * American Broadcasting Company (ABC) (original airing) * Columbia TriStar Domestic Television (2001) * Sony Pictures Television (2002-) -------------------------- Filming Location Columbia/Warner Bros. Ranch, Burbank, California, USA -------------------------- CREW: Directed by Bob Claver Irving J. Moore E.W. Swackhamer Writing credits (in alphabetical order) Larry Brody writer Jo Heims writer N. Richard Nash writer John O'Dea writer Jay Simms writer Skip Webster writer Produced by Robert Jon Carlson .... associate producer Bob Claver .... executive producer Paul Junger Witt .... producer Stan Schwimmer .... producer Original Music by Warren Barker Jack Keller (song "Seattle") Hugo Montenegro (song "Seattle") Ernie Sheldon (song "Seattle") Cinematography by Fred Jackman Jr. Film Editing by Asa Boyd Clark Stunts David Cass Jr. .... stunts David S. Cass Sr. .... stunts Gary Epper .... stunts Whitey Hughes .... stunts George Orrison .... stunts Alan Tomason .... stunts Jesse Wayne .... stunts Henry Wills .... stunts Other crew Carl Boles .... gaffer Stephen Lodge .... set costumer Scotty McEwin .... camera operator Pat McGrath .... key costumer Randall Robinson .... second assistant camera -----------------------------------moreless
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    NFL on CBS

    NFL on CBS

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    CBS
    Starting in 1956, CBS cobbled together ten regional networks to televise NFL games across America. Eleven of the 12 teams - all but Cleveland - signed on with CBS. For 38 consecutive years, CBS televised NFL games through the 1970 season and the National Football Conference after the merger. After the 1993 season, FOX won the rights to the NFC and NBC continued with the American Football Conference. When NBC's contract expired, CBS won the rights to televise AFC games.
    .
    With the 2009 season, the NFL on CBS celebrated 50 seasons on the air. The milestone 5,000th telecast came on the afternoon of November 28, 2010 in a Week 12 game between the Miami Dolphins and the Oakland Raiders.moreless
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    All Creatures Great and Small

    All Creatures Great and Small

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    BBC (ended 1990)
    This is a British comedy / drama that revolves around a veterinary practice owned by two brothers. A third vet comes to the practice and frequently finds himself caught up in the feuds between the brothers.moreless
  • 136
    Upstairs, Downstairs

    Upstairs, Downstairs

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    ITV (ended 1975)
    Upstairs, Downstairs follows the rich Bellamy family and their servants at their luxurious house in London. The show takes place between 1903-1930 and gives us an insight of the good old days. Emmy Awards and Nominations Winners in bold Outstanding Drama Series 1974 - PBS - Rex Firkin, Executive Producer; John Hawkesworth, Producer 1975 - PBS - Rex Firkin, Executive Producer; John Hawkesworth, Producer 1977 - PBS - John Hawkesworth, Producer; Joan Sullivan, Producer Outstanding Limited Series 1976 - PBS - Rex Firkin, Executive Producer; John Hawkesworth, Producer Outstanding Directing In A Drama Series 1975 - PBS - Bill Bain, Director 1976 - PBS - Christopher Hodson, Director Outstanding Writing In A Drama Series 1975 - PBS - John Hawkesworth, Writer 1975 - PBS - Alfred Shaughnessy, Writer 1976 - PBS - Alfred Shaughnessy, Writer Best Lead Actress In A Drama Series 1974 - PBS - Jean Marsh 1975 - PBS - Jean Marsh Outstanding Lead Actress In A Limited Series 1976 - PBS - Jean Marsh Outstanding Continuing Performance By A Supporting Actress In A Drama Series 1975 - PBS - Angela Baddeley 1976 - PBS - Angela Baddeley 1977 - PBS - Jacqueline Tong Outstanding Single Performance By A Supporting Actor In A Drama Series 1976 - PBS - Gordon Jackson moreless
  • 137
    The Persuaders!

    The Persuaders!

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    ITV (ended 1972)
    Welcome to The Persuaders! guide at TV.com. Lord Brett Sinclair and Danny Wilde, two wealthy playboys from very different backgrounds, are paired up by a judge who tasks them with becoming international crimestoppers. The Persuaders! was a Television Reporters International Tribune production for ITC.moreless
  • 138
    Heidi, Girl of the Alps

    Heidi, Girl of the Alps

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    Fuji Television (ended 1974)
    After becoming orphaned, Heidi is sent to live with her grandfather Ohi who lives in the Alm Mountains. Ohi is not the kind hearted stereotypical grandfather though and only takes in Heidi because he is forced to. Heidi is never daunted and always tries to remain as kind as possible, and may be just the thing to soften old Ohi's heart of stone.moreless
  • 139
    Crown Court

    Crown Court

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    ITV (ended 1984)
    Crown Court was a long-running courtroom drama shown in the afternoon, where each weekly case at the fictional Fulchester Crown Court, was split into three episodes. Ep 1 : the case for the prosecution, Ep 2 : the case for the defence, Ep 3 : summing up and verdict. (The verdict was given by a jury of real people and not actors, except the foreperson) The first case 'Doctor's Neglect?' was originally only shown in the Granada TV region. The series was produced by Granada for the ITV Network.moreless
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    The Richard Pryor Show

    The Richard Pryor Show

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    The star of controversial young comic Richard Pryor was very much on the rise, when he was approached by NBC, in 1977, to do a 1-hour special for the network. He had already experienced phenomenal success as a nightclub performer, and had his popularity was soaring, after his performances in the movies 'Silver Streak', and 'Greased Lightning'. The special - Entitled, simply: 'The Richard Pryor Special?' - Was aired in May of 1977. It was a smashing success, both critically, and commercially, and led to NBC's offer of a regular, weekly variety series, which Pryor soon accepted. Over his years as a nightclub comic, Pryor had developed a method of performing that led him to use material that was considered very risqué for TV, and, despite his misgivings, from the very start, he signed a contract to do 10 shows. But battles with network censors, over his material soon caused the angry Pryor to back out. NBC managed to sweet-talk him back, and he reluctantly agreed to only 4 shows, though - Being scheduled opposite ABC's super hits: 'Happy Days', and 'Laverne And Shirley' - He knew the series was doomed before it began. Pryor was determined to do it his way, however, despite network pressure, but the censors were relentless. In fact, the opening sequence of his very first show was cut, shortly before air time. In that sequence, Pryor appeared apparently naked (He was actually wearing a body stocking), as he commented on how he'd not given anything up in his battle with the network censors, as the shot slowly widened, to show that his genitalia were missing. Produced by Rocco Urbisci, for Burt Sugarman Productions, and directed by John Moffitt, the show was much different from other variety shows, with an interesting mixture of satire, slapstick, improvisation, music, dance, and even a bit of heavy drama thrown in, with a talented supporting cast (Which included future mega-star Robin Williams), and Pryor's unique brand of comedy keeping it all together.moreless
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