• 41
    Cops

    Cops

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    Spike TV
    Now known as the original reality series, COPS hit the airwaves in early 1989, putting camera crews in police cars all across the United States. Adopting the Cinema Verité style of documentary filming, COPS uses no narration, depending completely on the police officers and the footage shot as it happens to tell the story. Each COPS camera crew consists of a camera operator and a sound mixer. The officer is mic'd with a wireless mic directly to the camera and the sound mixer captures the suspects, witnesses and other officers with a boom mic. Multiple crews can be stationed in one area as well as crews working different cities across the country at the same time. Still one of the most popular television shows on the air, COPS moved from the FOX network to Spike TV in the fall of 2013, keeping it's original 8pm time slot on Saturday nights.moreless
  • 42
    The Waltons

    The Waltons

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    CBS (ended 1981)
    This is the story of the Waltons. The show takes place during the Depression and then during World War II. John & Olivia had eight kids, three girls and five boys. One of the boys died at birth; he was a twin to Jim-Bob. John and Olivia's children names are John-Boy, Jason, Mary Ellen, Erin, Ben, twins Jim-Bob & Joseph, and Elizabeth; Joseph died at birth. John's parents also lived with them - Esther and Zeb. The Waltons was based on the life of the Hamner family. Earl Hamner Jr. was the show's creator and narrator. This show was based on his life growing up.moreless
  • 43
    Wheel of Fortune

    Wheel of Fortune

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    Wheel of Fortune is in its 26th season (2008-2009 Season) with Pat Sajak & Vanna White. Wheel debuted in 1982.Wheel of Fortune has been renewed through the 2011-2012 season.

    One of the most successful game shows in history, Wheel of Fortune actually is a version of the children's game Hangman (with a large carnival wheel and prizes added). The game show, which did modestly well in the 1970s, became a worldwide phenomenon in the 1980s through syndication and made household names out of its hosts, Pat Sajak and Vanna White. Simply put, the Wheel has never stopped spinning since its premiere as an NBC daytime show that winter day in January 1975. (Ironically, the series replaced Jeopardy!, which later in 1984 when it returned, became its current companion in syndication.)

    The rules of the game Three contestants -- at various times during the run, including a returning champion -- compete. The host announces a category to a mystery puzzle (person, place, thing, phrase, quotation, event, landmark, occupation, etc.). The puzzle was originally contained on a three-tier, 36-space board (in 1981, changed to a four-tier, 52-space board; and in 1997, an all-electronic four-tier, 52-space board).

    The contestant selected to go first (by blind draw before the show) spin a large horizontally-situated carnival wheel containing dollar amounts and other spaces (including Bankrupt, Lose a Turn and Free Spin). If the contestant landed on a dollar amount, he/she could guess a letter thought to be in the puzzle; if it appeared, they received the cash multiplied by the number of times it appears in the puzzle (ergo, if the player guessed "T" after landing on $250, and "T" appeared twice, they received $500). An incorrect guess or landing on a penalty space (Bankrupt or Lose a Turn) caused control of the wheel to pass to the next contestant.

    At any point, the contestant in control of the wheel could spin again, ask to buy a vowel (at which point $250 was deducted from their score, and only if they had at least $250) or attempt to solve the puzzle; very early in the show's run, a player had to land on a Buy a Vowel space in order to buy a vowel, but this idea was scrapped before Wheel completed its first month on the air. The Bankrupt space caused the player to lose his accumulated winnings for that round (though all previous winnings were considered safe -- hence, "Once you buy a prize, it's yours to keep").

    If the player correctly guessed the puzzle's solution, he/she got to keep their accumulated winnings. Any contestant solving the puzzle and not having at least $100 (later $200 and still later, $500) was spotted that amount "on the house." Early rounds typically had lower dollar values on the wheel ($500 as a top space on round 1 early in the run/Bob Goen version, later that was changed to $750), but increased in subsequent rounds ($1,000 and $2,000 for the later rounds, to increase the excitement; $1,250 when Bob Goen hosted).

    Originally, the winnings were used to "go shopping" (i.e., purchase prizes) in one of the three revolving rooms on the set -- each containing: * Furniture -- enough to fill any room in the house, from the living room and dining room to bedroom or game room. * Appliances -- large and small, enough to make that dream kitchen or efficient laundry room. * Things for outside -- everything from swimming pools and patio furniture to barbecues, lawn games and garden equipment. * Clothing -- for every occasion. * Trips -- to any place imaginable, domestic or foreign. And don't forget the luggage and camera outfits. * Electronics -- TVs, stereos and much more! The show was among the first to offer early versions of VCRs (c. 1976), home video game units (c. 1978, Atari) and satellite dishes (late-1970s). * Gift Certificates -- everywhere to restaurants (Bonanza, Dairy Queen), clothing outlets (Casual Corner) and any other store (Western Auto). * Food -- from steaks from the Iowa Beef Council and chocolates to items from the Dessert of the Month Club. * Overall comfort and fun -- from a central air conditioning system and pinball machines to hot tubs and pizza parties. * Miscellaneous items -- everything from magazine subscriptions and collections of LPs from a record label to those famous ceramnic dalmations. and MUCH more.

    There were other announced prizes, usually worth much more than in the revolving rooms. While some prizes offered during the early years were no doubt unusual (such as rare antiques and African masks), the favorite prize, of course, were the cars. In the daytime show, there were two or three available, usually, a sports model (such as a Chevrolet Camaro) and an economy model (a Chevrolet Monza), but there were also more upmarket family cars (the Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme) and exotic foreign cars (a Lancia Beta coupe).

    Other top-ticket items proving popular were: * Other forms of transportation -- everything from boats, motorcycles and camping trailers. There was even, at one time, a 4-seat airplane and a motorhome available! * Furs -- before the animal rights groups got their way. * Jewelry -- everything from rings, necklaces, pearls, earrings, watches and much more!

    Starting in 1987 (primetime) and 1989 (daytime), the winner of a round received his accumulated bank in cash (thanks to beefs from contestants who had to pay steep taxes and preferred cash). During the shopping era, a contestant could elect to place any unused cash "on account" (which they could claim only upon winning a subsequent round AND avoiding the bankrupt space in the meantime); otherwise, unused winnings were placed on a gift certificate (usually to Gucci, Dicker and Dicker of Beverly Hills or another luxury shop seen on Rodeo Drive).

    If time ran short (signified by a series of "dings"), a "speed up" round was played, wherein the host gave the wheel one final spin, with vowels worth nothing and all consonants worth whatever the host landed on. The top-winning contestant after so many rounds completed within each show was the day's champion. In case of a tie, one of several things happened, depending on the year:

    * At first, all three players returned on the next show (even the third-place player). Everyone kept what they won on all shows. * Later, the two (or possibly all three) tied players played a one-round speedround to determine the champion. This format was used once the permanent bonus round was started.

    End Game - The Bonus Round At first, there was no bonus round, the top winner simply returned. Starting in 1981, the champion advanced to a bonus round, where they could select a prize (always worth $1,000 or more and signified with a gold star (or announced in some other way)) and, after choosing five consonants and one vowel, had 15 seconds to solve the puzzle.

    Prior to the bonus round becoming a permanent part of the game, there were several special weeks where bonus rounds were played. Games included (but not limited to):

    * 1975 hour-long format Bonus Round - Played during Wheel's short-lived 60-minute format, the day's overall winner selected one of four puzzles (labeled easy, medium, difficult and hard); the level of difficulty determined the prize (e.g., an easy puzzle may have been worth a TV-stereo console, while the difficult puzzle may have won the player a new Cadillac). The player then chose four consonants and a vowel and tried to solve the puzzle within 15 seconds. This is very similar to the current bonus round, except the level of difficulty did not necessarily correspond with the prize's value.

    * Any Prize in the House - The top winner simply chose a prize and they got it.

    * Star Bonus - By landing on a special token on the wheel, a contestant had the opportunity to advance to a special bonus round if they were one of the runners-up. That player could become champion by solving a puzzle and winning a prize that was worth more than the amount of the first-place player's lead. As with the 60-minute format's bonus round, the prize's value corresponded with the difficulty of the puzzle.

    This short-lived format wasn't always played, however, since the Star Bonus token sometimes wasn't landed on the entire show; the token could serve as insurance for a dominating player who wins the game (and possibly purchases the most-expensive prize, thereby making it unavailable for the opponents); or the expensive prize's value was not worth enough to cover the difference between the champion's winnings and his/her opponents.

    The rules of other games varied, but usually, the show had a bigger prize budget than during regular weeks.

    Changes through the years Many changes were made through the years, some very successful (luxury prizes in the syndicated version; $25,000 cash top bonus round prize), while others weren't (e.g., a "Doubler" token, which allowed contestants to double the potential value of the next spin; Rolf Benirschke as host of the daytime show; the infamous Megaword category, where a contestant had to correctly use the revealed word in a coherent sentence for an extra $500). Some of the more successful changes are detailed below.

    * For the syndicated version, decidedly luxury prizes were often advertised ("This $41,000 customized Cadillac Seville! "A $60,000 log cabin!" "A $25,000 trip around the world!"); plus a silver $5,000 space on the wheel's third round (replacing the $2,000 daytime show top space, though early syndicated shows had both the $2,000 and $5,000 spaces). Also, a bonus prize space was added in the second round of the syndicated show (and in 1987, a different bonus to the fourth round).

    * Meanwhile, in the daytime show, a "Jackpot" bonus space was added to the second round in 1987; it based at $1,000 and grew by $1,000 per show until claimed.

    * With the syndicated show's change to an all-cash format in 1987, the bonus round changed to having four (or sometimes, as many as six) grand prizes and $25,000 cash available as prizes. Originally meant to be a month-long promotion (the "Big Bonanza of Cash" before reverting to the tried-and-true post-puzzle shopping), this well-received format allowed more rounds – save for celebrity week gabfests, always at least four – to be played. Originally, the top wheel values were set thusly:

    - Round 1: $1,000. - Round 2: $2,500 (plus a bonus prize). - Round 3: $3,500. - Round 4-on: $5,000 (plus a bonus prize for Round 4 only, if time permits; sometimes, the bonus was used in Round 3 instead).

    This has since been changed, with the current setup as follows:

    - Round 1: $2,500, plus an $1,000 online shopping spree card that is placed on the wheel for the rest of the show a la the Free Spin, and may be picked up if a letter is correctly guessed. - Round 2: $3,500, plus a bonus prize, which remains on the wheel until a contestant picks it up. Until 2002, additional bonus prizes were placed on the wheel in subsequent rounds. – Round 3: $3,500, plus the Mystery Round spaces. - Round 4-on: $5,000, including the speed round.

    * During the 1988-1989 season, the contestant was given the six most popular letters -- R, S, T, L, N and E, and asked to select three more consonants and one vowel; the bonus round time limit was then shortened to 10 seconds.

    * Starting in 1989 (since $25,000 cash was far and away the most popular prize choice), the five grand prizes were placed in a blind draw, and could only be won once per week.

    * In 1996, the "returning champions" idea was scrapped, with a "Friday Finals" format instituted. Three new contestants appeared Monday through Thursday, with the week's top winners returning on Friday (regardless if they were their show's top winner) to play for a jackpot prize package. The latter format lasted only a couple of seasons before it, too, was scuttled.

    * In the 1990s, a Surprise space was added to the wheel, which was simply a prize that was announced only if won (usually a trip); this space has since been scrapped.

    * In the mid-1990s, a Jackpot round (third round initially, later the second round) allowed a contestant to claim an accumulating jackpot -- which based at $5,000 and accumulated with each dollar space landed on -- if they landed on a Jackpot space, correctly guessed a letter and solved the puzzle all in the same turn.

    * A few years after the jackpot round, a $10,000 space added to the wheel. The space was not multipliable; rather, it simply added $10,000 to the contestant's winnings if they solved the puzzle and avoided bankrupt. The space took up the center third of a standard wheel space, with two bankrupt spaces taking up the remainder (to add to the suspense). If the $10,000 part of the space was landed on and the contestant guessed correctly, it was placed face down in front of the contestant to read $10,000 (unlike the standard prize space, which was left face up).

    * "Toss Up" puzzles -- to determine who started the game -- were added prior to the first and fourth rounds, starting in the 2000-2001 season, each worth $1,000; a year later, two "Toss Up" puzzles were played, once before the contestant introductions and the second (now worth $2,000) to determine first round wheel control, with the pre-fourth round "Toss Up" now worth $3,000. If a contestant made an incorrect guess, he/she was out of the remainder of the puzzle; if all the letters were filled in or everyone guessed wrong, nobody won anything and wheel control began either with the left-most contestant or wherever it left off before.

    * During the 2000-2001 season, the "speed up" round was changed, wherein $1,000 was added to whatever dollar amount Sajak landed on. There was some cool music added, too.

    * Changes to the Bonus Round in October 2001. The contestant spun a mini- wheel containing 25 envelopes; Sajak removed the envelope; and win or lose, revealed the prize contained within (a car, $25,000 cash or a new top prize of $100,000; the top prize was contained in just one of the envelopes). In 2002-2003, more money amounts (one each of amounts between $30,000 and $50,000, each in $5,000 increments) were thrown into the mix. There have been at least five $100,000 winners and several others who have not been quite as fortunate.

    * Starting in 2002-2003, contestants who won nothing during the front game were given $500 just for playing (in addition to those lovely parting gifts).

    * A new Mystery space, added in the 2002-2003 season. Played in Round 3, two such spaces were placed on the wheel, with a $500 dollar value. Contestants landing on this space guessed a letter could either spin again or risk their accumulated bank, not knowing what's on the other side of the Mystery card. It could be Bankrupt or a new car (on occasion, it could be another prize, such as a $10,000 shopping spree). If it was a car, the contestant had to solve the puzzle and avoid the Bankrupt spaces to claim the car. The other Mystery space was then put out of play, becoming a regular $500 space. In September 2004, the values of the Mystery spaces dooubled to $1,000.

    A prize puzzle, added in the 2003-2004 season. One puzzle on each show (usually the second or third round) had some connection to a prize the contestant would win for solving the puzzle. For example, a contestant solving the puzzle "Check Your Local Listings" could win a plasma wall-screen television. The set underwent some revisions, too.

    Chuck and Susan and Pat and Vanna When the show started in 1975, Chuck Woolery was the host. For a brief time in the fall of 1979, Alex Trebek served as substitute host when Woolery took a leave of absence. In 1981, Woolery left for good when he was denied a pay raise (he wanted $500,000 per year, more than Merv Griffin was willing to offer. Chuck left, and Pat Sajak replaced him. Most of the Chuck Woolery episodes are hard to find, due to NBC's practice of destroying tapes from old shows. On the daytime version, ex-football star Benirschke on January 10, 1989, but he didn't work out too well. When the show moved from NBC to CBS, 6 months later, Bob Goen became the host, and was the host for two years (the show moved back to NBC in 1991 for 9 months). Pat Sajak still hosts the nighttime syndicated version.

    Susan Stafford was the original "letter turner." She was replaced by Summer Bartholemew on October 22, 1982, then Vicky McCarty three weeks later. (None of the Summer Bartholemew episodes exist due to NBC's practice of destroying tapes of old shows.) On December 13, 1982, McCarty left, and Vanna White became the new permanent hostess (BTW -- Vanna's first letter turned was a "T," in the puzzle "General Hospital"). As most game show fans know, this is not Vanna's first appearance on a game show. In June 1980, 2 1/2 years before her first appearance on Wheel of Fortune, America's favorite hostess was a contestant on The Price is Right in 1980, but she never left contestant's row (BTW – as a recurring joke, TPiR former icon/host Bob Barker always wondered aloud whatever became of her).

    Originally, Vanna rarely spoke on-camera (though she occasionally engaged in small talk with Pat at the end of the show); back then, Sajak would be introduced and then he would introduce Vanna, who always showed off a different dress or outfit (and for the record, no, she did NOT get to keep her clothes, which always come from the most glamorous of shops). However, as Vanna gained acclaim with the viewing audience, she talked more and more. Today, both Pat and Vanna walk out together and they always conversate after each program. Vanna often does the car prize descriptions prior to each bonus round.

    Charlie O'Donnell as the original announcer when Wheel of Fortune began. He left in 1982, and Jack Clark (who had earlier announced on occasion) took over full-time. Clark died of cancer in 1988 (Sajak offered a tribute to the long-time announcer in the 1988-1989 syndicated season premiere), and after a five-month stint by M.G. Kelly, O'Donnell returned, his trademark phrasing "WH-EEEEEEE-L OF FORTUNE" and "25 THOOOOOOOOOUSAND DOLLARS" intact.

    Retrospectives and going on the road Several tributes to the series have been shown through the years, most commonly as part of daytime talk shows and occasional bloopers specials. During its syndicated run, Wheel of Fortune has aired two retrospectives of its own - the first in November 1998, to mark its 3,000th show; and again in November 2003, when its 4,000th show aired, as part of a series of shows taped in New York.

    Speaking of which, Wheel of Fortune has gone "on the road" all over the country to tape shows. Among the first aired in November 1988, when the show taped from New York's Radio City Music Hall (legendary NBC announcer Don Pardo did voiceovers). Other cities have included (but are not limited to) Chicago, Nashville, Phoenix and Honolulu; and many of those episodes were part of special theme weeks (such as Best Friends Week) or have paired contestants with celebrities from a particular genre (e.g., NFL football players, country music stars).

    From Hangman to Wheel and everything in between The idea for the game show that eventually became Wheel of Fortune grew from a game known as Shopper's Bazaar. Two such pilots were produced – one in 1973 with Woolery as host, the other (from 1974) helmed by Edd Byrnes (best known as "Kookie" from the 1958-1964 detective drama, 77 Sunset Strip). The rules for the earlier pilot, hosted by Woolery, was quite different from the game we all came to know and love (e.g., a self-spinning wheel and the host pressing a button at the contestant's direction; prize money carried over to subsequent rounds and always "at risk;" etc.).

    The later pilot, hosted by Byrnes and a more talkative Stafford, was similar to what viewers first saw in 1975. When Merv Griffin Enterprises made their final plans to enter production in late 1974, a host had yet to be chosen. The story goes that Griffin's decision was made when he saw the producer's first choice, Byrnes, in the hallways prior to the taping of the first shows, repeating "A-E-I-O-U, A-E-I-O-U;" in an attempt to recall the vowels.

    It's the 60-minute Wh-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-l of Fortune In December 1975, a month after The Price is Right became a one-hour show, NBC experimented with an hour-long version of Wheel of Fortune.

    The game played thusly: Two sets of three contestants compete in three-round games each, as usual, with the returning champion playing in the second set of games. The top money winners of each three-round match met in a one-puzzle showdown for the right to advance to the bonus round (described above).

    The hour-long Wheel of Fortune lasted but a month, and returned to the 30-minute game we all came to love by the end of January 1976. BTW, several other NBC game show hits, including The Hollywood Squares, also briefly expanded to 60 minutes as part of the networks' promotion.

    Syndication Wheel of Fortune's phenomenal run in syndication almost never happened. As early as the fall of 1975, there was interest in producing a weekly nighttime show, but few syndicators were wanting to try and even fewer stations willing to buy, particularly because there were other powerhouse game shows airing (either Match Game PM or Family Feud, depending on the year) that were seen as insurmountable in the ratings.

    In 1983, King World Productions – a small-time distributor that had edited Our Gang shorts for television airing – took a chance on the show ... and it paid off royally! Airing on just 59 stations when the premiere aired Sept. 19, 1983, Wheel of Fortune (often pitted against latter-day Dawson's Family Feud) quickly soared in the ratings and within two years, was airing on nearly 200 stations and began its (thus far) permanent reign as the nation's top syndicated program. Jeopardy! rates second, with Friends reruns currently the shows' closest competitor.

    Wheel across the world (and (yuck) a kid's version, too) As Wheel of Fortune grew in popularity during the mid-1980s, countries all over the world began staging their own versions; each had their own "Pat and Vanna," and minor rules changes. Clips of these international versions are seen from time to time on the U.S. version.

    Also, a children's version of the program under the name Wheel 2000 also aired on CBS during the 1997-1998 season (with many modifications, see page for details).

    Merchandising Merchandise ... thy name is Wheel of Fortune. Even in the mid-1970s, there were two editions of the home game issued by Milton Bradley (complete with wheel, puzzle board and prize cards).

    But that was just the beginning, as by the mid-1980s, there were T-shirts, key chains, calendars and even an album of prize cue music featured on the show. Vanna merchandise also appeared, including her biography "Vanna Speaks."

    Home video games - from electronic hand-held units to cartridges and CD-ROMs for units that connect to TV - have also been highly popular (and have seen, in addition to subsequent editions with more puzzles and categories, special editions for children and sports fans).

    And through it all, one thing has not changed -- a vowel still costs you $250 (except during the Bob Goen network era/1989-91 CBS and 1991 NBC, when those A's, E's, I's, O's and U's cost just $100).moreless
  • 44
    Three's Company

    Three's Company

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    ABC (ended 1984)
    After two unsuccessful pilots, Three's Company was finally picked up by ABC in January 1977 for a first season of six episodes. After the show began to air in March, ratings were high and it became one of the highest-rated midseason show of its time. The show had a simple premise - Jack Tripper (John Ritter, a student at a local cooking college, wanted to move in with two girls, Janet Wood (Joyce DeWitt) and Chrissy Snow (Suzanne Somers). The only problem - the building's landlord, Mr. Stanley Roper (Norman Fell), who lives in the apartment below with his wife, Mrs. Helen Roper (Audra Lindley). In order for him to stay, he would have to pretend to be gay The series quickly gained a pop culture status, while maintaining the high ratings, being one of the top rated shows during its third and fourth seasons. The end of the third season saw the exit of Mr. and Mrs. Roper, who moved to a new townhouse community for The Ropers, the show's first spinoff. In came a new, and much different landlord, Mr. Furley (Don Knotts).

    During the hiatus before the fifth season, Suzanne Somers asked for a raise from $30,000 to $125,000 per episode. The producers refused, and Suzanne began to lie so she could be absent from work. Because ratings began to decline with lovable Chrissy's absence, the producers created a new character, Cindy Snow (Jennilee Harrison), who played Chrissy's cousin for the remainder of the season. At the same time, Suzanne Somers would tape short tag scenes for the end of the episode the day before the taping. She was fired by the end of the year.

    Starting off fresh during the sixth season, the producers decided to have Cindy go off to UCLA to study to become a veterinarian. So, Jack and Janet needed a new roommate. Along came Terri Alden (Priscilla Barnes), the smarter and beautiful blond who was a nurse at the local hospital. She would remain on the show for the next (and final) three years.

    Ratings began to fall during the eighth season (as they normally do), and the producers had made the decision to end the show, and create a spinoff, Three's A Crowd.

    Theme Song: Come and knock on our door ...
    We've been waiting for you ...
    Where the kisses are hers and hers and his,
    Three's company, too. Come and dance on on our floor...
    Take a step that is new ...
    We've a lovable space that needs your face,
    Three's company, too. You'll see that life is a ball again, laughter is calling for you ...
    Down at our rendez-vous,
    Three's company, too!
    moreless
  • 45
    Jeopardy!

    Jeopardy!

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    NBC
    "This... is... Jeopardy!"America's top-rated syndicated quiz show entered into its 29th season on September 17, 2012. Many subscribing stations have renewed the show through Season 32 (2015-2016). The show was originally created in the 1960s by Merv Griffin, a famed television host, musician, and actor. Irritated by the impossibility of trying to create a quiz show because of scandals that had taken place involving that genre, Griffin was inspired by a suggestion from his wife Julann to create a show wherein contestants were presented with clues in the form of answers, and had to phrase their responses in the form of a question. He originally was going to title the program What's the Question?, but ended up discarding that original title when a skeptical NBC network producer rejected his original concept, claiming, "It doesn't have enough jeopardies." The original Jeopardy!series premiered on March 30, 1964, as a daytime program on NBC. With Art Fleming as host and Don Pardo as announcer, that series continued to air until January 3, 1975, and also spawned a weekly syndicated version that aired within the 1974-1975 season. Later came a revival, The All-New Jeopardy!, which ran from October 2, 1978 through March 2, 1979; for this version, Fleming was joined by announcer John Harlan. The most successful incarnation of Jeopardy! is the current syndicated version, which has aired continuously since September 10, 1984, featuring the Canadian-born Alex Trebek as its host, joined by announcer Johnny Gilbert. This particular version of the program has lived up to its slogan as "America's Favorite Quiz Show," with over 6,000 episodes aired, and currently averages 25 million viewers per week. The show has featured over 10,000 different contestants over the course of its 29-year run, and a host of prominent personalities - including royalty, Presidents, film stars, television personalities, famous athletes, and Nobel laureates - have either presented special clues or appeared as contestants on the show. Since its premiere, the syndicated version ofJeopardy! has outlived 300 other game shows, won a record 30 Daytime Emmy Awards and a Peabody Award, and gained a worldwide following with a multitude of international adaptations. In addition, both TV Guideand the Game Show Network (GSN) have ranked it #2 on their respective lists of the 50 greatest game shows of all time. The longevity of Jeopardy!'s popularity has led it to being referenced and parodied in many television shows, films, and works of literature over the years, including such popular programs asSaturday Night Live, The Simpsons, Cheers, and The Golden Girls. Educators throughout the United States have created their own versions of the quiz show's game to encourage student participation in class, and even IBM has used the show to exhibit its artificial intelligence system "Watson" and have it compete against two of the show's finest champions in a "man versus machine" competition.moreless
  • 46
    Cheers

    Cheers

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    NBC (ended 1993)
    Sam (Ted Danson), a former pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, owns and runs Cheers, a cozy bar in Boston. Somewhat snobby, beautiful and intelligent Diane (Shelley Long) -- forced to become a waitress when her fiance jilts her -- constantly bickers with Sam. Eventually, they fall in love. Several wacky characters make the bar their home-away-from-home, including sarcastic waitress Carla (Rhea Perlman), beer-loving Norm (George Wendt) and Boston letter carrier Cliff (John Ratzenberger) A few seasons later, Sam sells the bar to buy a boat and sail around the world. But his boat sinks and he returns to bartending. Rebecca (Kirstie Alley), the new (more ambitious) manager, hires him back. They love to hate each other and eventually get together as well. Intro Theme: Making your way in the world today takes everything you got. Taking a break from all your worries sure would help a lot. Wouldn't you like to get away? Sometimes you wanna go where everybody knows your name, And they're always glad you came. You wanna be where you can see our troubles are all the same. You wanna be where everybody knows your name. You wanna go where people know people are all the same. You wanna go where everybody knows your name. Nielsen Ratings: #75 in the 1982-1983 season #13 in the 1984-1985 season #5 in the 1985-1986 season #3 in the 1986-1987 season #3 in the 1987-1988 season #4 in the 1988-1989 season #3 in the 1989-1990 season #1 in the 1990-1991 season #4 in the 1991-1992 season #9 in the 1992-1993 seasonmoreless
  • 47
    Looney Tunes

    Looney Tunes

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    Cartoon Network
    Looney Tunes is a show that reruns classic cartoons featuring Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Tweety, Sylvester, Pepe le Pew, Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Foghorn Leghorn and more. These classic characters were featured in 1000+ theatrical cartoons and many prime-time specials made for TV as well as numerous classic cartoon excerpts. Looney Tunes was originally aimed at an adult audience when it aired for the first time in 1955, but unfortunately it was censored. It eventually became a show for children known as The Bugs Bunny Show in 1960, which aired on ABC. Looney Tunes made it's way to Nickelodeon along with numerous Warner Bros. classic cartoons including some of their oldest black-and-whites and almost their complete canon of '60s cartoons. This show started in 1988 and ended in 1999. Now, the Boomerang block on Cartoon Network is the only place in the US where you can still see these timeless classic characters and their animated antics.moreless
  • 48
    The Cosby Show

    The Cosby Show

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    NBC (ended 1992)
    Dr. Heathcliff "Cliff" Huxtable was an OBGYN (obstetrician/gynecologist), and his wife Clair was a successful attorney. They had five children: Sondra, Denise, Theo, Vanessa and Rudy. Sondra was rarely seen during the first season because she was away at Princeton. She became a regular character in the second season, and was usually seen with her on-again off-again beau, Elvin. They eventually married and had twins; but not before stunning their families by announcing the fact that Elvin was dropping out of medical school to open a camping store, and Sondra was dropping out of law school to help her husband in his endeavor. Denise was the "unique" child, the black sheep of the family. She had her own way of doing things, right down to the style of clothing she wore. After graduating high school, she left for Hillman College in 1986 (a year later, this would become the setting for the spin-off A Different World), but returned two years later with news that she was dropping out. She eventually decided to become a photographer's assistant, and left for Africa for a year. When she returned, she had yet another bombshell: she had become a wife and mother while over in Africa. She married a navy man, Martin; who had a child, Olivia, from a previous marriage. During the final season, Denise travelled with Martin as he was stationed in Asia. Olivia stayed behind with Cliff and Clair. Theo, Vanessa and Rudy were probably the most popular of the five kids, due to the fact that they were seen more often then Sondra and Denise. Most of the stories revolved around the three youngest children. Stories dealt mainly with dating and school life, as well as Cliff's never-ending fear that his children would never leave home. In the final episode, Theo graduated from college. The Cosby Show was for the late '80s what Dallas was for the early eighties. Dallas was the number one show during most of the early eighties; but then situation comedies bumped all prime-time soaps down. The Cosby Show proved to be fierce competition, becoming the number one show from 1985-1990. In fact, in 8 years it never dropped below the top 20. NBC Broadcast History September 1984-June 1992----Thursdays----8:00 p.m. July 1992-September 1992----Thursdays----8:30 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #3 in the 1984-1985 Season #1 in the 1985-1986 Season #1 in the 1986-1987 Season #1 in the 1987-1988 Season #1 in the 1988-1989 Season #1 in the 1989-1990 Season #5 in the 1990-1991 Season #18 in the 1991-1992 Season The most watched Cosby Show episode ever was "Say Hello to a Good Buy" which aired on January 22, 1987. The episode received a 41.3 rating, 56 share, and was seen by 64,980,000 viewers. Watch The Cosby Show on TBS. Weekdays at 1pm & 1:30pm The Cosby Show is also being shown in syndication, check local listings.moreless
  • 49
    Hawaii Five-O

    Hawaii Five-O

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    CBS (ended 1980)
    Hawaii Five-O was created by Leonard Freeman as a series that not only featured law and order issues but also presented the beauty of the Hawaiian islands.

    The original cast featured Jack Lord as Steve McGarrett, head of Hawaii Five-0, with James McArthur playing Danny Williams (replacing Tim O'Kelley from the pilot), Zulu as Kono Kalakaua and Kam Fong as Chin Ho Kelly. At the end of the 1971-72 season, Zulu left the series after a disagreement and was replaced by Al Harrington as Ben Kokua. After Leonard Freeman died, Al Harrington was dropped with no reason given, after 10 appearances in the 1974-75 season although his episodes were scattered throughout the year.

    Douglas Mossman helped to replace the 'Ben' role in later episodes as Frank Kemana. By the 1976-77 season, supporting character Duke Lukela, played by Herman Wedemeyer, was so popular that he was given star billing on the show, following Kam Fong. When CBS delayed making a decision on the show's future at the end of the 1978-79 season due to falling ratings and the perception of poorly executed stories, James MacArthur took the opportunity to leave the series after 11 years.

    The 1979-80 season saw major changes in the show. William Smith, as James 'Kimo' Carew, was bought in to replace James MacArthur, and the producers also added a new female Five-0 member, Sharon Farrell as Lori Wilson. Completing the new line-up were existing Five-0 member Duke, and Moe Keale as Truck Kealoha. CBS finished Hawaii Five-0's prime-time run on April 5, 1980

    ===============

    Other Info Pilot (Coccoon) only

    1. Company credits Production Companies * CBS Television * Leonard Freeman Production

    Distributors * CBS Television (original airing) * Paramount Pictures ------- 2. Awards Emmy Awards 1969 -- Nominated -- Outstanding Achievement in Musical Composition -- Morton Stevens (composer) ------ 3. Filming Locations: Honolulu, O'ahu, Hawaii, USA ------ 4. Release dates: USA -- 20 September 1968

    ======================

    Other Info Series

    1. Company credits Production Companies * CBS Television * Leonard Freeman Production

    Distributors * CBS Television * Independent Television (ITV) * Paramount Television * Viacom

    Other Companies * Ford Motor Company consideration furnisher * Polifroni/Sabba casting ------ 2. Awards American Cinema Editors, USA 1976 -- Nominated -- Best Edited Episode from a Television Series -- Jack Gleason [For episode "Turkey Shoot".] 1974 -- Nominated -- Best Edited Episode from a Television Series -- Jack Gleason [For episode "One Big Happy Family".] Edgar Allan Poe Awards 1974 -- Nominated -- Best Television Episode -- Jerome Coopersmith [For episode "Here Today, Gone Tonight".] 1973 -- Nominated -- Best Television Episode -- Will Lorin [For episode "Bait Once, Bait Twice".] Emmy Awards 1976 -- Nominated -- Outstanding Lead Actress for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy Series -- Helen Hayes [For episode "Retire In Sunny Hawaii... Forever".] 1974 -- Won -- Best Music Composition - For a Series, a Single Program of a Series -- Morton Stevens (composer) [For episode "Hookman".] 1970 -- Won -- Outstanding Achievement in Music Composition - For a Series or a Single Program of a Series (In Its First Year Only) -- Morton Stevens (composer) [For episode "A Thousand Pardons, You're Dead".] ------ 3. Release dates USA -- 26 September 1968 Netherlands -- 19 April 1969 UK -- 19 July 1970 West Germany -- 30 April 1971 France -- 15 July 1973 ------ 4. Filming Locations

    Hawaii Film Studio - 18th Avenue & Diamond Head Road, Honolulu, O'ahu, Hawaii, USA (studio)

    Honolulu, O'ahu, Hawaii, USA O`ahu, Hawaii, USA

    ========================

    Literature: Monographic related book: Rhodes, Karen. Booking Hawaii Five-0: An Episode Guide and Critical History of the 1968-1980 Television Detective Series. McFarland & Company, Inc. (Jefferson, North Carolina), 1997, ISBN: 0786401710

    ======================

    Series Trivia * Gregory Peck was offered the lead role of McGarrett. He turned it down. * Kam Fong, who played Det. Chin Ho Kelly (1968-78), was an actual officer with the Honolulu Police Department who served from 1946 to his retirement in 1962 to take up a career in real estate. * Other than Wo Fat, other notable adversaries for McGarrett that appeared in more than one episode included mob bosses Henore Vaschon (played by Harold Gould) and Tony Alika (played by Ross Martin), pimp Big Chicken (played by Gavin MacLeod) and the Robin Hood-like Lewis Avery Filer (played by Hume Cronyn). * Jack Lord was the only member of the cast to stay with the series during it's entire 12 year run. Kam Fong (Chin Ho Kelly) left after the 10th season. James MacArthur (Danny Williams) left after the 11th season. * At the end of the episode "A Death In The Family", where Chin Ho Kelly was murdered, Steve McGarrett (Jack Lord) books the suspect himself, saying, "Chin would have liked that." It was the only time during the series that McGarrett personally booked a suspect. * The character of Duke Lukela first appeared as an HPD sergeant before becoming a Hawaii Five-O investigator. * The syndicate that Tony Alika headed was called "Kumu". * McGarrett finally caught Wo Fat in the final episode of the series. However, at the end of the episode, Wo Fat can be seen digging into his boot and taking out a file leaving it open for a possible reunion episode. * "Magnum, P.I." (1980) began production soon after this series wrapped its last episode. In order to keep some sort of continuity, reference to characters from this show were included in early episodes of Magnum. However, a plan to have Jack Lord appear as McGarrett never came to pass. Lord retired from acting after the series went off the air. * Chin Ho Kelly (Kam Fong) was the only member of the cast to be "killed off". He was murdered in the episode "A Death in the Family" while investigating a protection racket. * McGarrett was a Naval Intelligence officer before he became head of Five-O. In fact, he was in the reserves and went on active duty from time to time to assist the Navy on special cases. * In the episode "The Singapore File" McGarrett flies to Singapore to retrieve a witness, and returns to Honolulu. Singapore was actually downtown Honolulu. At the end of the episode, they are at a temple in Manila; they were actually at the Valley of the Temples in Kaneohe, Hawaii. * McGarrett actually caught Wo Fat in one encounter, but was forced to give him up because the Chinese government wanted him back in trade for a downed U2 pilot. * Zulu (Det. Kono) was the first of the regular cast to depart the show. He left in the 4th season. * McGarrett has a sister that lives in California. * Like McGarrett, Jack Lord was in the Navy. He was a public affairs officer, attaining the rank of lieutenant. * Before joining Five-O, Danny attended the University of Hawaii and then transferred to the University of California where he graduated with a degree in Criminology. * McGarrett often referred to Kono as "Big Kanaka". * McGarrett often referred to his secretary, May, as "Love". * McGarrett was a Korean War veteran. * McGarrett supposedly had his office in Iolani Palace, the actual palace used by the last kings and queens of Hawaii. This building was in danger of being leveled for a parking lot, but today it has been restored and can be toured for a $20 fee. It has never been used by the state police. * Besides government intelligence chief Jonathan Kaye, another recurring character was policewoman Sandy Welles. * "Danny" was played by a different actor in the pilot. * Several actors played different roles in various episodes before becoming recurring cast members. * Chin Ho (Kam Fong) smoked a pipe. * Al Harrington and Herman Wedemeyer both appeared in different roles on the show before assuming the roles of Ben and Duke respectively. Wedemeyer was in the very first episode playing Honolulu police Lt. Balta. * Despite the attention that Hawaii Five-0 brought to Hawaiian state law enforcement, Hawaii is the only state that has no state police agency. * The hula dancer in the opening montage is played by Helen Kuoha-Torco, now a professor at Windward Community college.

    =====================

    Continuity Goofs for Series

    *In some earlier episodes, McGarrett can be seen leaving his headquarters in a 1967 Mercury 2 door sedan. When he reaches his destination, he's driving a 1968 Mercury 4 door sedan. *After the original 1968 Mercury was retired, and replaced with a '74 Marquis Brougham 4-door hardtop, some stock footage was used of the '68 passing or in traffic. *From 1970 to 1976, Al Eben played Doc Bergman. In one episode, "A Bullet for McGarrett", his name is Doc Abraham.

    ====================

    Rockford Judged Top TV Detective: 4 July 2000 (StudioBriefing) The Rockford Files (1974) Jim Rockford has topped a TV Guide survey in which readers were asked to name their favorite TV detectives ever. The magazine commented, "The crimes he solved were hardly complex. And his detective work was rudimentary at best. But from the moment he told a client, 'I get 200 dollars-a-day, plus expenses,' you were hooked." Columbo placed second in the survey, but Jessica Fletcher of the long-running Murder, She Wrote did not even make the top 10, coming in at 13. The top ten are: 1. James Garner as Jim Rockford in The Rockford Files (1974) 2. Peter Falk, Columbo 3. Andre Braugher as Frank Pembleton in Homicide: Life on the Street 4. Tyne Daly and Sharon Gless in Cagney and Lacey 5. Telly Savalas, Kojak 6. Tom Selleck, Magnum P.I. 7. Helen Mirren as Jane Tennison in Prime Suspect 8. Cybil Shepherd and Bruce Willis as Maddie Hayes and David Addison in Moonlighting 9. Jack Lord as Steve McGarrett in Hawaii Five-0 10. Dennis Franz as Andy Sipowicz in NYPD Blue.moreless
  • 50
    The New Yankee Workshop

    The New Yankee Workshop

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    PBS (ended 2009)
    America's favorite craftsman, Norm Abram, continues to re-create timeless classics while taking on new challenges. Join Norm in TNYW for his trademark, step-by-step approach that will inspire woodworkers-from casual to expert-to roll up their sleeves, put on their safety goggles, and get building.moreless
  • 51
    Dynasty

    Dynasty

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    ABC (ended 1989)
    Dynasty was a larger than life soaps opera that purported to portray the lives of the wealthy rich while embracing the greed, glamour and excesses of the Reagan-era 1980s. The story set in Denver, Colorado, centered around the wealthy but troubled Carrington family, headed by the powerful oil tycoon Blake Carrington (John Forsythe). In the premiere episode, Blake married his beautiful and sweet secretary Krystle (Linda Evans), much to the chagrin of Blake's spoiled daughter, Fallon (Pamela Sue Martin), and Krystle's ex-lover, Matthew Blaisdel (Bo Hopkins). Blake also had trouble dealing with the fact that his son Steven (Al Corley) was a homosexual and, at the end of the first season, Blake accidentally killed Steven's ex-lover when he found him and Steven in an embrace. In the second season premiere, Blake's world turned upside down. Not only was he on trial for murder, but his scheming ex-wife, Alexis (Joan Collins), re-entered his life to testify against him. After the trial, she ended up staying in Devener only to wreak more havoc against him and his new wife, Krystle. Initially, the show was dismissed as a clone of another primetime soap opera, Dallas, which also centered around a rich powerful family who made their fortune in oil. However, Dynasty distinguished itself from Dallas and the other primetime soap operas of its era by by embracing campy over-the-top storylines over realistic ones and larger-than-life fashions. By the end of the 1984-1985 season, Dynasty became the #1 TV show in the United States, beating out its rival, Dallas, and spinning off a second series, The Colbys (originally titled, Dynasty II: The Colbys). However, in subsequent seasons, ratings began to decline as viewers grew tired of the over-the-top storylines, such as Moldavia, Krystle's look-a-like. After 9 seasons and 218 episodes on ABC, the show was cancelled. Two years later, ABC aired a 4 hour mini-series, Dynasty: The Reunion, to wrap up the loose ends of the series, which ended with an unresolved cliffhanger. After its cancellation, the show was syndicated and eventually aired on SOAPnet, the ABC-owned 24-hour soap opera channel. The show received more interest in the new millenium with the airing of a satirical 2005 TV-movie, Dynasty: The Making of a Guilty Pleasure; a 2006 cast reunion special, Dynasty Reunion: Catfights & Caviar, and of course, the release of the first few seasons on DVD. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #19 in the 1981-1982 Season #5 in the 1982-1983 Season #3 in the 1983-1984 Season #1 in the 1984-1985 Season #7 in the 1985-1986 Season #24 in the 1986-1987 Season ABC Broadcast History: January 1981 - April 1981 -- Mondays 10:00 PM November 1981 - April 1983 -- Wednesdays 10:00 PM September 1983 - May 1987 -- Wednesdays 9:00 PM September 1987 - March 1988 -- Wednesdays 10:00 PM November 1988 - May 1989 -- Thursdays 9:00 PMmoreless
  • 52
    Murder, She Wrote

    Murder, She Wrote

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    CBS (ended 1996)
    Murder seems to follow Jessica Fletcher, a former English teacher and a mystery writer full of charm, zest-for-life, and personality; who happens to become "the investigator" when traveling around the country to promote a series of novels. Murder always occurs when she is present. Even in Cabot Cove! Although Angela Lansbury was the only regular character throughout the series entire run, she was frequently joined by a number of recurring and special guest stars, including Tom Bosley as Sheriff Amos Tupper in the early seasons and Ron Masak as Sheriff Mort Metzger in the later seasons, William Windom as Dr. Seth Hazlitt, Michael Horton as her nephew Grady Fletcher (one of her many, many relatives), and from time to time Jerry Orbach would appear as private eye Harry McGraw. Orbach's role later led into a short-lived spin-off, The Law & Harry McGraw. The series aired a total of 263 color episodes from 7 October 1984 through 19 May 1996 and five telemovies (including the pilot movie, which aired in September of 1984). As of the fall of 2009, 10 seasons have been released on DVD, with the 11th season due to be released in early 2010.moreless
  • 53
    Doctor Who (1963)

    Doctor Who (1963)

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    BBC (ended 1989)
    "My name is William Hartnell, and as Doctor Who, I make my debut on Saturday 23rd November at 5.15." Doctor Who is the longest-running science fiction TV series in history, airing initially from 1963 to 1989. The series told the story of the Doctor, a mysterious traveller in space and time, whose TARDIS can take him and his companions anywhere in time and space. Inevitably he finds evil at work wherever he goes… The series was postponed indefintely in 1989, but fans of the series would not allow it to die, and a whole cottage industry was created around original novels and audio-only productions. There was an abortive attempt to renew the franchise as a series of telemovies in the U.S., but ratings for the pilot were judged insufficient. In 2003, the BBC announced that, at long last, it would commission a revival of Doctor Who. The series, initially starring Christopher Eccleston as the Doctor, was launched in 2005. You can read about the new series here. Traditionally listed by production, the data on this site has now been amended to TV.com standards and lists each of the 697 broadcast episodes from the original series. I hope that you find the site useful, and that it might act as a springboard to the wider world of Doctor Who appreciation. TheOldBillmoreless
  • 54
    Frontline

    Frontline

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    PBS
    Since it began in 1983, ‘Frontline' has been airing public-affairs documentaries that explore a wide scope of the complex human experience. Frontline's goal is to extend the impact of the documentary beyond its initial broadcast by serving as a catalyst for change.moreless
  • 55
    Who's the Boss?

    Who's the Boss?

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    ABC (ended 1992)
    Tony is a funny and loveable father and man, with good-looking Italian looks, who tries to be the best possible for his daughter and everybody else.... Angela is a successful and upper-class businesswoman, who tries to be there for her son Jonathan, whenever possible; and who has a hot temper.... Samantha is Tony's wise-cracking street-smart daughter, who has a tendancy to get into hot water.... Jonathan, is Angela's adorable and smart son, who is wise beyond his years.... And Mona, is Angela's man-hungry mother, who will do anything for a night out with a man. ABC Broadcast History September 1984; Thursday 8:30 - 9:00 October 1984 - April 1985; Tuesday 8:30 - 9:00 April 1985 - July 1985; Tuesday 9:00 - 9:30 July 1985 - August 1991; Tuesdays 8:00 - 8:30 August 1991 - September 1991; Tuesday 8:30 - 9:00 September 1991 - January 1992; Saturday 8:00 - 8:30 February 1992 - March 1992; Saturday 8:30 - 9:00 March 1992 - June 1992; Saturday 8:00 - 8:30 June 1992 - July 1992; Wednesday 9:30 - 10:00 July 1992 - September 1992; Thursday 8:00 - 8:30 Syndication Currently airing on Ion television Monday through Thursday nights from 10pm to 11pm EST. Check your local listings.moreless
  • 56
    Married... With Children

    Married... With Children

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    FOX (ended 1997)
    Married... with Children is a show about shoe salesman Al Bundy who raises his dysfunctional family. Peg Bundy is Al's wife, she is addicted to shopping and watching Oprah. Marcy Rhoades/D'Arcy is the Bundys' neighbor who works as a banker. Marcy was married to Steve Rhoades, another banker, for a few years but they ended up getting a divorce. A year later Marcy met and got married to Jefferson D'Arcy, a former spy who had various jobs, but he preferred being a house husband. Kelly Bundy is the attractive daughter with the intelligence of a fruitfly. Bud Bundy is the son who has bad luck with women. Fox Broadcast History: April 1987-October 1987---Sundays-8:00 p.m. October 1987-July 1989---Sundays-8:30 p.m. July 1989-August 1996---Sundays-9:00 p.m. September 1996-June 1997---Saturdays-9:00 p.m.moreless
  • 57
    The Flintstones

    The Flintstones

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    ABC (ended 2001)
    The Flintstones was a parody on modern suburban life, set in the Stone Age. The characters in the cartoon series all behaved and spoke in a contemporary manner, though they lived in the prehistoric city of Bedrock. Fred worked as operator of a dinosaur-powered crane at Rock Hard & Quarry Cave Construction Co. (slogan: "Own Your Own Cave and Be Secure"). Around their split-level cave the Flintstones enjoyed such conveniences as Wilma's Stoneway piano, a hi-fi on which Fred could play his "rock" music (it consisted of a turntable and a bird with a long beak to serve as a needle), a vacuum cleaner (a baby elephant with a long trunk), and an automatic garbage disposal unit (a famished buzzard stashed under the sink). Their car, which sported tail fins, also came equipped with steamroller wheels--to smooth out the rocky road. Then one day in 1963 they were blessed with a baby daughter, whom they named Pebbles. Not to be outdone, their neighbors the Rubbles adopted an orphan boy named Bamm Bamm. (The two kids later had a Saturday morning cartoon series of their own, Pebbles and Bamm Bamm.) The Flintstones was always as much adult satire as children's fun. In many respects it resembled Jackie Gleason's popular Honeymooners, especially in the relationships of the principals. A wide range of caricatures passed through the stories: Lollobrickida, a pretty cook; Ann-Margrock, whose voice was supplied by Ann-Margret; attorney Perry Masonry (he never lost a case); Ed Sullystone, a TV host; Eppy Brianstone, a teenage impresario; and Weirdly and Creepella Gruesome, the strange couple who with their son Goblin moved into a cave nearby (this was a parody on The Addams Family and The Munsters, then popular). The Gruesomes thought that they were normal, and everyone else in Bedrock was odd. The Flintstones and its spin-offs had a highly successful run on Saturday mornings--on NBC from January 1967-September 1970, on CBS from September 1972-January 1974, back on NBC from February 1979-September 1984, and on ABC with The Flintstone Kids from September 1986-September 1989. This series has also many movies and specials (about 10 specials). Some of them are:"A Flintstones Christmas Carol", a flintstones version of the famous Charles Dickens book, "A Flintstones Christmas" where Fred replaces Santa Claus (Pebbles and Bamm Bamm are speaking now), "I Yabba Dabba Do" where Pebbles and Bamm Bamm are grown up and get married, and "Holly-Rock-a-bye Baby" where Pebbles gives birth.moreless
  • 58
    The Dukes of Hazzard

    The Dukes of Hazzard

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    CBS (ended 1985)
    The Duke Family -- cousins Bo ( John Schneider) and Luke (Tom Wopat), assisted by their cousin Daisy ( Catherine Bach) and their uncle, Jesse (Denver Pyle)-- fight the system and root out the corrupt practices of Hazzard County Commissioner Boss Hogg (Sorrell Booke) and his bumbling brother-in-law-Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane (James Best). The show became an instant hit, never failing to win its time slot during its original run on CBS for seven seasons from 1979-1985. The Duke boys, a pair of 'Robin Hood' types complete with bows and Dynamite arrows, are assisted in their adventures by their car, an orange 1969 Dodge Charger named 'The General Lee'. The Dukes of Hazzard is set in Georgia, and the show's southern influence is felt throughout. Country singing superstar Waylon Jennings performed the famous theme song to the show (Good Ol' Boys), and acts as The Balladeer, narrating the adventures of each episode. Furthermore, many of the plots revolved around the Dukes' history as an ex-moon-shining family. The story followed Bo and Luke until season five, because during episodes 87 through 104, their cousins Coy (Byron Cherry)and Vance (Christopher Mayer) replaced the boys while the went on to join NASCAR Circuit. Bo and Luke won, but returned to Hazzard after great season at the NASCAR Circuit. Innocently naive Deputy Enos Strate, though technically a member of the law under Boss Hogg, strives for justice and fairness, while also having a major crush on Daisy. Ace mechanic Cooter Davenport helps the Dukes along the way, and Deputy Cletus Hogg, though not as honest as Enos, subtlety assists the Dukes escape from 'Hogg justice'. The series had an extremely successful run in syndication beginning in 1996 on TNN, the Nashville Network. This led to a resurgence in the popularity of the "Dukes". Two reunion movies, featuring the surviving members of the cast, aired in 1997 and 2000. The show currently airs on CMT (Country Music Television) and in the summer of 2005 experienced another huge revival with the film version, starring Seann William Scott, Johnny Knoxville, Willie Nelson and Jessica Simpson. A Prequel was Made in 2007 and shown in 2 weeks on ABC Family in 2008 during the summer.moreless
  • 59
    Rescue 911

    Rescue 911

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    CBS (ended 1996)
    Rescue 911 was a reality show hosted by William Shatner. It consisted of re-enactments of real life emergency situations and documentaries of hospitals, police, and firefighters. It ran for seven seasons on CBS from 1989 to 1996.moreless
  • 60
    Reading Rainbow

    Reading Rainbow

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    PBS (ended 2006)
    Reading Rainbow is a children's series designed to promote reading comprehension in elementary school age children. Host LeVar Burton introduces the theme of the episode and the book to be profiled in an animated story using the illustrations from the book and narrated by a celebrity such as Bill Cosby, Ruby Dee, Richard Gere, and the late great stars Ossie Davis, Julia Child, Raul Julia and Gilda Radner for example. After the story is finished, feature stories in the same subject as the book are profiled and youth reviewers give critiques of three additional books. LeVar usually introduces the children critics by saying, "But you don't have to take my word for it."moreless
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