• 81
    Thomas The Tank Engine & Friends

    Thomas The Tank Engine & Friends

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    ITV
    Welcome to the Thomas The Tank Engine & Friends guide at TV.com. The show is about a tank engine, Thomas, and his friends who live on the Island of Sodor. Together, the engines work on the railways under the supervision of Sir Topham Hatt, the "Fat Controller." Thomas The Tank Engine actually dates back to 1945, when the Reverend Wilbert Vere Awdry created The Railway Series to amuse his son Christopher, who was suffering from measles. His wife Margaret encouraged him to publish the stories and he did so, going on to add another book each year (except 1947 and 1971) until 1972. Wilbert's son Christopher later continued The Railway Series up to 40 books. In 1984 Britt Allcroft decided to turn the stories into a TV series with Ringo Starr as the narrator. He was replaced by Michael Angelis in 1991, who still narrates today. (Full Narrator listings below.) When the series was shown on PBS in the US, it was part of a show called Shining Time Station. 2 of the show's narrators played Mr. Conductor in the series, Ringo Starr in the earlier episodes and George Carlin later. Since the show ran from 1989 to 1993, only early episodes of Thomas are part of it. A note on writers: In the episode guide, the writers are as follows: If the episode is based on a Railway Series book by the Rev W Awdry, he will be credited as the writer. If the episode is based on a Railway Series book by Christopher Awdry, he will be credited as the writer. If the episode is not based on a Railway Series book, Britt Allcroft and David Mitton will be credited as the writers since they wrote it. From Season 6 the writers are varied. Thomas the Tank Engine & Friends is Based on The Railway Series by The Reverend W. Awdry. Thomas the Tank Engine & Friends and Thomas & Friends are trademarks of HIT Entertainment Inc.moreless
  • 82
    The A-Team

    The A-Team

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    NBC (ended 1987)
    "In 1972 a crack commando unit was sent to prison by a military court for a crime they didn't commit. These men promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, they survive as soldiers of fortune. If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find them, maybe you can hire: THE A-TEAM." ========================== Broadcast History NBC---Jan. 1983---Sunday 10:00-11:00 NBC---Feb. 1983-Aug. 1986---Tuesday 8:00-9:00 NBC---Aug. 1986-Dec. 1986---Friday 8:00-9:00 NBC---Dec. 1986---Tuesday 8:00-9:00 NBC---May 1987-Jun. 1987---Sunday 7:00-8:00 ===================== Theme by: Mike Post & Pete Carpenter ========================moreless
  • 83
    Taxi

    Taxi

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    ABC (ended 1983)
    Taxi's television history is filled with contradictions. Produced by some of television comedy's most well-regarded talent, the show was canceled by two different networks. Despite winning fourteen Emmy Awards in only five seasons, the program's ratings were rock-bottom for its final seasons. Although it thrives in syndication and is still well-loved by many viewers, Taxi will be best remembered as the ancestral bridge between two of the most successful sit-coms of all time: The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Cheers. In the mid-1970s, MTM Productions had achieved huge success with both popularity and critical appraisal. So it was an unexpected move when four of the company's finest writers and producers, James L. Brooks, Stan Daniels, David Davis, and Ed. Weinberger, jumped off the stable ship of MTM in 1978 to form their own production company, John Charles Walters Company. To launch their new venture, they looked back to an idea that Brooks and Davis had previously considered with MTM: the daily life of a New York City taxi company. From MTM head Grant Tinker they purchased the rights to the newspaper article that had initiated the concept and began producing this new show at Paramount for ABC. They brought a few other MTM veterans along for the ride, including director James Burrows and writer/producers Glen and Les Charles. Although Taxi certainly bore many of the trademark signs of "quality television" as exemplified by MTM, other changes in style and focus distinguished this from an MTM product. After working on the middle-class female-centered worlds of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Rhoda, and Phyllis for years, the group at John Charles Walters wanted to create a program focusing on blue-collar male experience. MTM programs all had clearly defined settings, but Taxi's creators wanted a show that was firmly rooted in a city's identity--Taxi's situations and mood were distinctly New York. Despite MTM Productions innovations in creating ensemble character comedy, there was always one central star around which the ensemble revolved. In Taxi Judd Hirsch's Alex Reiger was a main character, but his importance seemed secondary to the centrality of the ensemble and the Sunshine Cab Company itself. While The Mary Tyler Moore Show proudly proclaimed that "you're going to make it on your own," the destitute drivers of Taxi were doomed to perpetual failure; the closest any of them came to happiness was Reiger's content acceptance of his lot in life--to be a cabby. Taxi debuted on 12 September 1978, amidst a strong ABC Tuesday night line-up. It followed Three's Company, a wildly-successful example of the type of show MTM "quality" sit-coms reacted against. Taxi used this strong position to end the season ninth in the ratings and garner its first of three straight Emmys for Outstanding Comedy Series. The show's success was due to its excellent writing, Burrows's award-winning directing using his innovative four-camera technique, and its largely unknown but talented cast. Danny DeVito's Louie DePalma soon became one of the most despised men on television--possibly the most unredeemable and worthless louse of a character ever to reside on the small screen. Andy Kaufman's foreign mechanic Latka Gravas provided over-the-top comedy within an ensemble emphasizing subtle character humor. But Kaufman sometimes also brought a demonic edge to the character, an echo of his infamous appearances on Saturday Night Live as a macho wrestler of women and Mighty Mouse lip-syncher. In the second season Christopher Lloyd's Reverend Jim Ignatowski was added to the group as television's first drugged-out '60s burn-out character. But Lloyd's Emmy-winning performance created in Jim more than just a storehouse of fried brain cells; he established a deep, complex humanity that moved far beyond mere caricature. The program launched successful movie careers for DeVito and Lloyd, as well as the fairly-notable television careers of Tony Danza and Marilu Henner; Kaufman's controversial career would certainly have continued had he not died of cancer in 1984. In its third season ABC moved Taxi from beneath Three's Company's protective wing to a more competitive Wednesday night slot; the ratings plummeted and Taxi finished the next two years in 53rd place. ABC canceled the show in early 1982 as part of a larger network push away from "quality" and toward the Aaron Spelling-produced popular fare of Dynasty and The Love Boat. HBO bid for the show, looking for it to become the first ongoing sitcom for the pay channel, but lost out to NBC, which scheduled the series for the 1982-83 season. Ironically, this reunited the show's executive producers with their former boss Tinker, who had taken over NBC. Tinker's reign at NBC was focused, not surprisingly, on "quality" programming which he hoped would attract viewers to the perennially last-place network. Taxi was partnered with a very compatible show on Thursday night--Cheers, created by Taxi veterans Charles, Burrows, and Charles. Although this line-up featured some of the great programs in television history--the comedies were sandwiched by dramas Fame and Hill St. Blues--the ratings were dreadful and Taxi finished the season in 73rd place. NBC was willing to stick by Cheers for another chance, but felt Taxi had run its course and canceled it at the end of the season. Had Taxi been given another year or two, it would have been part of one of the most successful nights on television, featuring The Cosby Show (co-created by Taxi creator Weinberger), Family Ties, Hill St. Blues, L.A. Law, and eventual powerhouse Cheers. Taxi lives on in syndication, but its most significant place in television history is as the middle generation between The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Cheers. It served as a transition between the star-driven middle-class character comedy of MTM programs and the location-centered ensemble comedy inhabited by the losers of Cheers and Taxi. Considered one of the great sit-coms of its era, Taxi stands as a prime example of the constant tension in television programming between standards of "quality" and reliance on high ratings to determine success. --Jason Mittel The Museum of Broadcast Communicationsmoreless
  • 84
    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

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    BBC Two (ended 1981)
    Don't Panic! The Hitch Hikers' Guide to the Galaxy is a classic British television series from the early 1980s, starting out as a BBC Radio series of six episodes which grew to twelve episodes, then five best-selling books and a hugely successful TV series (this one). Finally, a feature film appeared in 2005. The creator, the late Douglas Adams, had been a script editor on Doctor Who and he once said the idea for the show came to him while he was lying drunk in a field near Innsbruck. Quirky British humour runs through all formats of the Guide, but what sets this version apart from the others of is the animated graphics created by Rod Lord – unlike anything seen on British TV until then. They inspired the animation in a TVO educational series called Landscape of Geometry (1983). The show won several awards, including BAFTA Awards in 1982 for Best Graphics (Rod Lord), and Best Sound Supervisor (Michael McCarthy), as well as an RTS Television Award 1982 for Most Original Programme.moreless
  • 85
    Airwolf

    Airwolf

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    CBS (ended 1987)
    Created by Donald P. Bellisario, who had already had such hits as 'Magnum p.i.' (1980-1988), 'Airwolf' followed the adventures of a hi-tech helicopter and it's reclusive pilot, Stringfellow Hawke. Bellisario developed Airwolf (early working titles: Blackwolf, Lonewolf), from the loose concept of a third season 'Magnum, P.I.' episode he'd previously written, titled 'Two Birds Of A Feather' (1983) - an unsold pilot about a treasure-hunting, adventure-loving ace combat pilot named Sam Houston Hunter (William Lucking). Bellisario had come up with the concept after Lucking played a similar character in a couple of episodes of another Bellisario series, 'Tales Of The Gold Monkey' (1982-3). After the proposed new series wasn't picked up, Bellisario took the bare bones of the concept, and eventually developed the premise into 'Airwolf'. Airwolf itself was a hi-tech attack helicopter, equipped with cutting-edge on-board computer, surveillance and radar systems, able to fly quicker than the fastest jets, and armed with awesome fire-power. Dubbed "The Lady" due to it's slender grace, Airwolf had been constructed by "The Firm", a mysterious, top-secret division of the C.I.A., distinguishable by it's agents all-white dress code. At the start of the Pilot adventure, we see Airwolf on its maiden test flight, piloted by its creator, Dr. Moffet (David Hemmings). But after the successful test flight, the twisted Moffet turns the chopper's lethal fire-power onto the flight tower, causing carnage, before heading off to Libya in the machine. Michael Coldsmith-Briggs III, codename "Archangel" (Alex Cord), the head of the division who built Airwolf, is badly wounded in the assault but not yet out of the game. Now wearing an eye-patch and walking with aid of a cane as a result of his injuries, he calls upon ace combat pilot Stringfellow Hawke (Jan-Michael Vincent) to take the task of bringing back Airwolf from Libya. Hawke is a cello-playing recluse, living in his scenaric cabin in the mountains – with a priceless art collection, and with only his dog Tet for company - ever since his brother St. John went Missing In Action in the Vietnam War, never to be found. Hawke eventually agrees to take the mission, aided by his only close friend, Dominic Santini (Ernest Borgnine). Much Hawke's senior, Dominic was very much his mentor, who was prone to the odd bout of grouchiness, but for the majority of the time was raucously cheerful. He owned Santini Air, a flight company that's main vehicles were decked out in stars and stripes, which specialised in performing arial stunts for films. Hawke and Dominic prised Airwolf back from Moffet's clutches (blowing away it's twisted genius creator in the process), but Hawke wasn't ready to return it back over to the Firm just yet. Hiding it in a hollow mountain in the middle of the desert wilderness, he refused to return the super-chopper until the Firm found solid information about his M.I.A. brother St. John, be he dead or alive. Thus was set the scenario for the series, with Archangel - usually accompanied by assistant Marella (Deborah Pratt) - calling upon Hawke in times of crisis to fly Airwolf on missions of national concern, with the occasional glimmer of hope regarding finding St. John - or at least solid information about his fate - thrown in for good measure. The first season was intelligently written, with a very classy, elegant feel. It was in many ways ahead of it's time, being distinctly dark and dramatic, with heavy religious over-tones and symbolisms, and with stories revolving around cases of international espionage, spying, and such-like, and much talk of "the opposition" - be it taken to be Libyans, the Russians, or whichever assumptions one took. The series did fairly well in the ratings, but CBS wanted to achieve even higher numbers, by "domesticating" the show more – to make stories less dark and symbolic, and to make things more light-hearted to try and win a wider audience. When the second season arrived, it brought with it the most significant and notable change - the introduction of a regular female cast member, created by Bellisario after CBS's insistence. Introduced in the season's opening episode, 'Sweet Britches', Jean Bruce Scott was brought in as feisty Caitlin O'Shannessy, who within the season's first few episodes was set-up as a regular character, working at Santini Air, and before long became the occasional third Airwolf pilot. Also with the new season, The Firm was blended into the background somewhat, to allow more wider-ranging stories, again mostly due to CBS's insistence. Overall the season did well, with much of the dark intrigue still surviving from the first series, mixed with the new slightly lighter-hearted, wider-reaching stories. In the meantime, Bellisario and Deborah Pratt, having met on the show, had married. But by the end of the season, Bellisario had grown increasingly tired of CBS' constant "interfering" with his original vision for the series, and eventually left, taking Pratt with him. The pair left to work on new projects of their own, the biggest and most popular to date being 'Quantum Leap' (with which Airwolf shares much of it's dark, religious over-tones, as well as also using a horde of the same Bellisario-favoured actors and crew). Also behind the scenes, Jan-Michael Vincent's troubled personal life - including battles with drink and drugs, and frequence fights with his wife - were increasingly causing problems during production of the series. Vincent actually broke his arm during one such drunken row with his wife, mid-production of one episode, 'Sins Of The Past', with his right arm visibally hanging limp throughout much of the episode as a result. CBS brought the series back for a third season, now without Bellisario's overseeing (his name on the show survived only as 'Created by' on the opening credits). While still offering up some good episodes, including some very impressive action set pieces (both airborne and otherwise), overall the previous sharp, clever script quality was now somewhat lower, and things were by now noticeably more watered down, with the series now acting as a more all-round "family" action-adventure show. Whilst they still occasionally had their moments, both Hawke's reclusive broodiness, and the whole eerie mysteriousness surrounding The Firm – two key factors in Bellisario's original vision - were by now very toned down. (Incidentally, with the third season, the Firm became spelt as an acronym, "the F.I.R.M.", though what these initials stood for was never explained.) The majority of episode plots were by now a far cry from the original season's dark themes; it's often commented (rightly so in several cases) that, far from the early stories of international emergencies, many of this season's stories seemed to revolve around little more than domestic feuds! But the worst was yet to come... CBS finally called it a day with 'Airwolf' at the end of the third season in 1986 - the last episode being 'Birds Of Paradise', an avarage episode which didn't serve to round to series off in any way. Despite CBS's constant tampering trying to make it an even bigger hit, in the long-run was much the cause of the demise of the show, with ratings gradually dropping mostly as a result of the third season's many more "family friendly" story-lines which lost favour with many fans. Jan-Michael Vincent's ever increasingly troubled personal life had done nothing to ease production of the series, either. However, the rights to the series were brought by a small TV company, Atlantis, for the USA Network, and a new series was commissioned for syndication. The whole of the original cast were written out (no doubt due to cost) – both Hawke and Dominic are killed off in the opening episode (though only Jan-Michael Vincent is actually seen), Archangel is suddenly said to be assigned overseas, and what has become of Caitlin is never mentioned. Taking their place was an all new cast. In the opening episode, 'Blackjack', Hawke's long-missing brother St. John (now seemingly his younger brother, not older, and played by Barry Van Dyke is suddenly located. The original series had several contradictions over St. John, but this new version completely threw any previous continuity out of the window! The Firm was now suddenly, unexplainedly called "The Company" (gone too were the trademark white suits), at which Jason Locke (Anthony Sherwood) is the new contact. He calls upon Major Mike Rivers (Geraint Wyn Davies) to help locate Airwolf – only to find that Dominic's niece, the - previously unmentioned - Jo Santini (Michelle Scarabelli) has already found it, and in it, they set off to rescue St. John. After his rescue began a new season of adventures, often with very little feel of connection to the original series. The new series was filmed on a very low budget in Canada, and much of the aerial footage – including ALL footage of Airwolf in flight, was simply footage recycled from the original three seasons. Other times, very poor model effects of Airwolf were used. Special effects (bar the stock footage) were weak, most of the stories were incredibly dull and wooden, much of the acting was poor - the series was embarrassing at best. There seemed little place for logic, either - the new contact, Locke, clearly knew of Airwolf's location (and often flew it himself!!), yet made no attempt to return it to the Company. In the original, Stringfellow Hawke, and at a push, Dominic or Caitlin, were capable of flying Airwolf – yet suddenly, each of the new characters could pilot it... the whole premise was full of holes. It seems maybe rather amazing (not to mention such a shame) that from the dark, classy, "ahead-of-it's-time" first season, things could end up as this. Understandably, many Airwolf "purists" will refuse to recognise this series as part of the "proper" Airwolf fodder. Suddenly, despite all of the CBS third season's short-comings, fans now found themselves saying "come back third season, all is forgiven", and would have given anything to have the original series, in any of it's versions from the original three seasons, back in place of this crudely produced revamp! Airwolf wasn't the only "super helicopter" on air at the time of it's debut – there was also hi-tech police surveillance chopper 'Blue Thunder' (1984), spun-off from the 1983 movie of the same name; but even with that series having a big-screen film to kick it off, Airwolf generally emerged to be seen as the "ultimate" super-helicopter series, with - at it's peak - it's clever, cathartic scripts paling Blue Thunder's much wider, less serious take. Airwolf itself was a highly modified Bell 222b, with a number of fibreglass and aluminium sections fitted to give it its unique look. In the TV series Airwolf may have been capable of supersonic speeds, but in reality, the numerous additions resulted in only slowing the helicopter's speeds! Sadly, the aircraft used for Airwolf crashed in Germany in 1991 (however, most of the specially built modifications are still in existence in the depths of Universal Studios). Note: This article, as well as episode guest cast lists, synopses and all other material in this guide (unless otherwise contributed) is written by the editor of this show. While it is intended for the reference and enjoyment of fellow fans of the show, please ask permission before using it, be it whole or in part, elsewhere.moreless
  • 86
    The Mike Douglas Show

    The Mike Douglas Show

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    (ended 1981)
    The Mike Douglas Show was first broadcast live in 1961 from the studios of KYW-TV (owned by Westinghouse Broadcasting Company) in Cleveland, Ohio as a local program (Mike Douglas's salary was $400 per week). The show offered a wide variety of guests, ranging from Richard Nixon to the Rolling Stones. Most of the guests, though, were entertainers (singers and/or musicians) along with a fair share of comics. The show is probably MOST noted for its exposure and introduction of (now) famous musical acts and singers, including Barbra Streisand and Aretha Franklin. Regretfully, Westinghouse taped over the Streisand shows to produce editorials. (These yet-to-be-famous performers were given a package deal that, after appearing on the show, would perform at a now-defunct night club in suburban Lakewood called The Chateau.) The show also showcased all of the latest rock groups of the 1960s. These groups ranged from "The Box-Tops" (1968), "Herman's Hermits" (1965 and 1967), the "Strawberry Alarm Clock" (1967), "The Turtles" (1968 and 1969) to John Lennon and "The Plastic Ono Band" (1972). A true example of the amazing cross section of guests who appeared on any particular show was when "The Turtles" appeared on the same show with comedic actor Ted Knight, and author, Truman Capote. In the words of Howard Kaylan (of the Turtles), "Not too shabby." In August, 1963, The Mike Douglas Show went into national syndication with a total of 5 local markets (Westinghouse owned local TV stations in Baltimore, San Francisco, Boston and Pittsburgh) airing the program. Following Westinghouse's victory in a lawsuit against NBC in June of 1965, The Mike Douglas Show moved to a basement studio (142 seats) at 1619 Walnut St. in Philadelphia. (This was the new home of KYW, owned and operated by Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, Group W Productions). The show discontinued live broadcasts in early 1965 following some "off-color" language verbalized by guest Zsa Zsa Gabor. At this time the show's popularity grew extensively and by 1967 the show reached 171 markets, had over 6,000,000 daily viewers (mostly housewives), and was bringing in over $10.5 million annually in sponsors' fees. At this time Mike Douglas's salary was over $500,000 annually. Also in 1967, the program received an Emmy Award for Individual Achievement in Daytime Television, the first such award ever given by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The show remained at the Walnut St. location until July 31, 1972, when the move was made to a newly constructed studio at 5th and Market Sts. in Philadelphia, where KYW remains today. This was the first time a studio was constructed especially for the show. The last PHILADELPHIA broadcast was in July, 1978, when the show moved to LOS ANGELES, California. The last airing was November, 1981. Note: Mike Douglas started another syndicated program, "The Mike Douglas Entertainment Hour," which ceased production in 1982.moreless
  • 87
    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    Welcome to The Hollywood Squares guide at TV.com. After 2 failed multi-star games (People Will Talk and The Celebrity Game), Game show executive producers Merrill Heatter-Bob Quigley finally hit pay dirt with THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES. The centerpiece of this classic game show was essentially a huge tic-tac-toe board. In each of the nine squares that sat a star (or often, more than one), armed with bluffs and quips aplenty. The show made it's debut on NBC-TV Daytime on Monday-Friday October 17-21, 1966. Actor-Comedian Peter Marshall served as "The Master of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" acting both as the straight man & the abettor to the fun. 2 contestants which is including a returning champion compete in A Best 2-out-of-3 match of Tic-Tac-Toe. The male contestant is "Mr. X" (The "X") & The female is "Miss/Ms. Circle" (The "O"). In turn, each contestant picks a star to which "The Master" Marshall reads a question. Many of the stars gave zany bluffs (joke answers aka "Zingers") before coming up with the actual answer; sometimes they also gave a funny explanation. It's up to the contestant to figure it out when the answer to the question by saying "I Agree" or "I Disagree" with the star. A Correct judgment wins the contestant gets the square otherwise An Wrong Judgment meant the contestant gets the square. That's unless it leads to win Tic-Tac-Toe for which the contestant willing to earn him/herself in order to win the square. The 1st Contestant to complete a tic-tac-toe (3 Stars Across: Left & Right, Up & Down or Diagonally & Sideways or Otherwise 5-6 Squares on NBC-TV) win the game/match & collects the cash, which varied concerning on the show's portion: • NBC-TV Daytime: $100 per game+($300+100=$400 Bonus)=$500 per match up to $2500 (October 17, 1966-February 10, 1967) & The New Car. $200 per game, $400 per match up to $2000 & The New Car from February 13, 1967 to June 20, 1980. • NBC-TV Nighttime (1968 ) : $300 per game. • Syndicated (1971-1981): $250 per game. The Certain Games are designated as the Secret Square games (see below), which is a bonus prize (or prize package & early on with the additional cash) for the contestant who'll wins everything. To Win The Secret Square Prize Package, The contestant will picks the star (up to this/that point, known only to the home audience at the shot of Color Television Camera to Make A Close-Up on 1 of The 9 Stars) for which Marshall reads a special Hollywood multiple choice question. If the contestant's correct by agreeing or disagreeing the right or wrong, he or she wins The Secret Square Prize Package. On NBC-TV Daytime: The prizes (as well as Cash) can win on "The Secret Square" for The 1st, 2nd or The Rubber Game of The Match for the cash & prize package is worth started about & exactly $1000 from October 17 to December 30, 1966 and begins increasing the total within $1000 Greater or Less from January 3, 1967 to June 20, 1980 (especially if a trip, fur coat or boat are included) and before being itself collected. • NBC-TV Nighttime (Friday Night January 12-September 13, 1968 ) : The 1st 2 Secret Square on the show. The 1st Prize is generally a trip (either around the world to Europe or South America) & The 2nd & Last Prize is A New Car (most frequently The 1968 Pontiac Firebird though the Oldsmobile Cutlass and AMC AMX are also offered). • Syndicated (Nighttime & Weekday/Night) : In The 1st 2 Seasons (1971-1973), The 1st 2 Games of each & every week, Season 3 to 7: The 1st 3 Games (1973-1978 ). At 1st, The Losing Secret Square Prize Packages going up to 2-3 Games of the show and losing it when the contestant made the star's answer to the Secret Square Question by Agreeing or Disagreeing Wrong. At first, each Secret Square is worth about $2000 but later, All individual prize packages are worth as much as $7000! Later in the nighttime syndicated run (Seasons 8 & 9: 1978-1980 ) The Secret Square goes to Games 1, 2 (and later 3) are used in separate style in Season 8 when "The Bonus Prize Squares" is added to the nighttime syndicated edition along with NBC-TV Daytime Edition. At 1st, There's No Bonus Game from October 17, 1966 to September 3, 1976; The Returning Champions simply faced The New Challenger before the commercial break & Finally on September 6-10, 1976, The New "Bonus Prize Squares" game is added & where's the champion to picks the star and win an merchandise item or additional cash prize ($500 to $5000) and in the 1978-1979 Season of the show, The Same merchandise items or the cash prizes are doubled ($1000 to $10,000 in 1979-1980). Originally, A 5-Match Champion Undefeated also winning $2000 (Earlier $2500) & A New Car to Leaves the show from October 17, 1966 to January 2, 1976. The Bonus Award are upped handsomely on January 5-9, 1976 as called "THE WHOLE THING" and this/that include 2 cars (always at least one very nice car, such as the Chevrolet Caprice Classic or Pontiac Grand Prix), 1 Cruise Ship & $5000 cash for early of it's own period (On January 3-7, 1977, the winners win 1 Car, 1 Cruise Ship & $10,000 Cash) are totaled $25,000 (Earlier it's all totaled $20,000). • NBC nighttime: The contestant in the leads to win A Bonus Prize – usually a TV/stereo console or a new kitchen. Average value is about $1500. • Syndicated: The contestant in the leads to win a new car – always an economy car (such as the Chevrolet Vega or Datsun B210). Also, in The NBC Nighttime & Syndicated Portions, when time expired in the middle of the game (with the sound of the horn aka "The Tacky Buzzer"), each contestant is given $50 for each square they've got after the last question is answered & played (unless a contestant got a tic-tac-toe); even contestants who didn't win any cash were given $100 just for competing. Virtually every major star from every genre – Television, Movies, Music, Sports, Fashion, Regular Experts, New York's Broadway & Other Local Shows in The U.S. of the 1960s through early 1980s are stopped by with their star quips (zingers) & bluffs. Hollywood legends also appeared as cameos either as the star's squares or sit-ins. The Most Popular Regulars (SQUARE OWNERS) are Rose Marie, Charley Weaver (1966-1974), Wally Cox (1967-1973), Morey Amsterdam (1967-1969), Abby Dalton (1967-1970), George Gobel (1974-1981) and ... of course, the all-time center square Paul Lynde (1968-1981). Paul Lynde – by the way – He's not always the center square as he didn't become the permanent occupant of that space up to the weekday broadcast of October 14-18, 1968. Before Lynde the permanent center square, comedian Buddy Hackett was the most common star to sit in the center square (on the nighttime edition in 1968). Lynde was the center square on nearly every broadcast until he left on August 20-24, 1979; he returned to the center square for a part of the 1980-1981 Las Vegas syndicated season and was a special guest for not sitting the same center square, but sitting the different square for the final syndicated episode on September 11, 1981. Ernest Borgnine was the center square during the debut weekday broadcast of October 17-21, 1966, while Wayland Flowers & Madame was the NBC daytime show's last center square on the last weekday broadcast of June 16-20, 1980 and George Gobel was the last syndicated-version center square on September 7-11, 1981. On November 1-7 1971, a syndicated nighttime portion of The Hollywood Squares released. At first, the show was once-a-week, but once the show proved popular, it quickly expanded to a twice-a-week show starting on September 11-17 1972. 3 Months after the last NBC daytime show aired on June 20, 1980, the production of The Hollywood Squares moved to Las Vegas and the show expanded to five-day-a-week. The expanded syndicated format lasted one season (September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981) with a repeat of the last NBC-TV 1979-1980 Daytime Season for the 1981-1982 Season and being Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. 3 Theme songs of The Hollywood Squares are all used. The 1st Theme (1966-1969) called "The Silly Song" is composed by (The Late) Jimmie Haskell. Beginning in the 1969-1970 season (Season 4) and it's replaced by a musical piece is composed by (The Late) William Loose for known to game show aficionados as "Merrill and Bob's Theme," It's The 2nd Theme of The Hollywood Squares is mostly identified and it ended before & after the 1978-1979 season (Season 13.) The Disco-Flavored Theme called "The Hollywood Bowl" is composed by (The Late) Stan Worth (who wrote many TV theme songs) became The 3rd & Last Theme Song Starting on September 10-14, 1979 & Finishing it on September 11, 1981. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" broadcasted on NBC-TV Daytime and cancelled severely on June 16-20, 1980, when it's replaced by David Letterman's ultimately unsuccessful daytime talk-variety show on June 23-27, 1980. 3 Remarks are all having tries for success including a brief marriage to Match Game in 1983-1984 (as THE MATCH GAME/HOLLYWOOD SQUARES HOUR); A 1986-1989 Syndicated entry hosted by frequent original The Hollywood Squares Square Placer John Davidson (as The New HOLLYWOOD SQUARES) & The 1998-2004 Edition (as HOLLYWOOD SQUARES "H2") hosted by talk show personality Tom Bergeron (Fresh out of WBZ-TV NBC "Now CBS 4" Boston's "PEOPLE ARE TALKING"). From April 2002 to October 2003, reruns of the Peter Marshall-hosted Hollywood Squares ran on Game Show Network (and now GSN); the package included 14 NBC-TV primetime and 116 syndicated episodes (130 total). Originally having aired in several weekday/night timeslots, the show is eventually downgraded to weekend-only airings (at 10:30-11:00 AM EDT). Despite a promising start and wide promotion, the reruns never drew high ratings or young audiences (in part because many to most of the stars have died in the same & different years or are really too unfamiliar to younger viewers) and are all eventually replaced with reruns of the Tom Bergeron Hollywood Squares edition right through August 31, 2007. On March 30-April 3, 2009 "(The All-New) HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" has came back to GSN-play everyday to the lineup for GSN LIVE. In 2010 The Show now seen on weekends featuring the 1st 2 Seasons of "HOLLYWOOD Squares" from 1998 to 2000 and soon after it's gone for good. The Broadcast History of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES: {NBC Daytime} October 17, 1966-October 1, 1976 Monday-Friday at 11:30 AM-12NOON Eastern October 4, 1976-September 29, 1978 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM October 2, 1978-March 2, 1979 Monday–Friday at 1:00-1:30 PM (or 4:00-4:30 PM) March 5-August 10, 1979 Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00 PM August 13, 1979-June 20, 1980 Monday–Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM. {NBC Nighttime} January 12-September 13, 1968 – 9:30-10:00 PM Friday. {Syndicated} November 1, 1971-September 11, 1981 – Various nights at 7:30-8:00 PM Eastern (Monday-Saturday) & 5:30-6:00 PM Eastern (Sunday) and for the last 2 seasons for Weekdays/Weeknights at various times which depending on market and Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES (1966)" is A MERRILL HEATTER (hQ) BOB QUIGLEY PRODUCTION-A Filmways Company. Now This Show Owned by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Television.moreless
  • 88
    Emmerdale

    Emmerdale

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    ITV
    Emmerdale first screened on ITV on the 16th of October 1972, which makes it one of the longest running soaps in British Television History.
  • 89
    Unsolved Mysteries

    Unsolved Mysteries

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    NBC
    Unsolved Mysteries explores unsolved cases in which you, the viewer, can call in or write and solve them. The show looks at cases such as: lost loves, missing persons, homocide, supernatural, the unexplained, wanted, etc. Unsolved Mysteries usually has four segments in one show, and sometimes shows updates. Unsolved Mysteries has solved 40% of their featured cases, that is 300 cases solved out of about 1,200. Broadcast History First Telecast:October 5, 1988 (as a regular NBC series Last Telecast: Sep 1988-Sep 1994, NBC Wed 8:00-9:00 Sep 1994, NBC Sun 7:00-8:00 Oct 1994-Sep 1997, NBC Fri 8:00-9:00 Apr 1998-May 1998, CBS Fri 9:00-10:00 Jul 1998-Aug 1998, CBS Fri 9:00-10:00 Apr 1999-Aug 1999, CBS Fri 9:00-10:00 Jul 2001-2002, Lifetime Mon-Fri 1:00-2:00 Oct 2008-,Spike TVmoreless
  • 90
    America's Funniest Home Videos

    America's Funniest Home Videos

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    ABC
    America's Funniest Home Videos is ABC's longest-running comedy series. The show began with original host Bob Saget (Full House)The series was an instant sensation on Sunday nights and ran for seven successful seasons. The show was re-launched with new hosts John Fugelsang (a stand up comedian with a one man show called Junk Male) & Daisy Fuentes (Loving), with a new hour long format, and moved to Monday nights where it would once again become a ratings success and then aired on Saturday. Then, after several years of being shown as an occasional special hosted by D.L. Hughley (The Hughleys) and Richard Kind (Spin City), ABC brought the series back on Friday nights with new host Tom Bergeron (Hollywood Squares). In September 2003, it was moved back to Sunday nights. Once again, the series has become a success. On This Show First Price is 10,000 and second is 5,000 and 3,000 for third also there is a 100,000 grand price show every so often where the 10,000 winners compete for 100,000.moreless
  • 91
    Lovejoy

    Lovejoy

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    BBC (ended 1994)
    Welcome to the Lovejoy guide at TV.com. Lovejoy is a colourful East Anglian antique dealer who lives a somewhat hand-to-mouth life, despite being called a divvie - a man who knows in his bones the right and wrong of fine things. The Lovejoy Antiques team includes Tinker Dill, Lovejoy's barker, Eric Catchpole, his apprentice (the son of the local butcher), and Jane Felsham, the supportive lady of a local grandee. In the fifth and sixth series Lovejoy develops a special relationship with the elegant Charlotte Cavendish, who heads an auction house. Lovejoy's business rival Charlie Gimbert is both his landlord and a competitor for good buys of all kinds. Beth Taylor joins Lovejoy's team on a youth employment scheme in the middle of the fifth series. The show ran for almost nine years, from 1986 to 1994, and is still being repeated in several countries. It was created for television by Ian La Frenais and is based on the Lovejoy books by Jonathan Gash.moreless
  • 92
    American Gladiators

    American Gladiators

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    FOX (ended 1996)
    This is Malibu. The cool, laid back surfer at home on the beach. You're looking at Lace. Feminine, sexy but always a lady. You're looking at Gemini. A split personality. Calm one minute, violent the next. This is Zap. Strong, silent, the Terminator. You're looking at Nitro. Cocky, explosive and always aggressive. And this is Sunny. The All American Woman. These are the American Gladiators and the events that they compete in are fast paced, exciting, confrontational, visually interesting, action oriented and capable of producing emotional moments. American Gladiators first premiered in January of 1989 along with RollerGames. It originally started out in a Colosseum-like setting at Universal Studios consisting of two male & female contestants chosen at regional tryouts that pitted their strengths, speed and skills against the highly trained pro athletes, the American Gladiators.
    The 1st Season: The original American Gladiators consisted of Gemini, Zap, Nitro, Lace, Malibu and Sunny. Mike Adamle and Joe Theismann hosted. The events included The Joust, The Assault, Powerball, The Human Cannonball, Breakthrough and Conquer and the Eliminator. The 1st Half Season winners were Tracy Phillips and Brian Hutson while Nancy Petitto and Craig Williams were the runner-ups. The 1st Season 2nd Half: Four new Gladiators joined Gemini, Zap, Nitro and Lace for this second half of the season. They were Laser, Blaze, Gold and Titan. A new event called the Wall was added as well as a new Co-host, Todd Christensen. The 2nd Half Season winners were Lucian Anderson and Bridget Venturi while Wendy Brown and Elden Kidd were the runner-ups. In the Grand Championship, Brian Hutson and Bridget Venturi won over Tracy Phillips and Lucian Anderson. The 2nd Season: Four new Gladiators joined the ranks among Gemini, Lace, Nitro, Gold, Laser and Blaze. They were Turbo, Ice, Thunder and Diamond. Larry Csonka joined Mike Adamle as the new co-host. 2 new events called Atlasphere and Hang Tough were added to the events list. This year began the season were it was split into two halves. The 1st Half winners were Maria Nichting and Rico Costantino while Trish Tillotson and John Adams were the runner-ups. The 2nd Half winners were Dorian Cumberbatch and Craig Branham while Deena Telly and Scott Deiter were the runner-ups. Craig and Dorian competed against Rico and Maria and came out as the Grand Champions of Season 3. In the Alumni Championships, Lucian Anderson and Cheryl Ann Silach from the 2nd Season competed against Terry Moore and Aimee Ross from the 1st Season to win. The 3rd Season: Zap makes a return to the arena along with 3 new Gladiators; Tower, Storm and Viper who joined Gemini, Lace, Nitro, Gold, Laser, Blaze, Thunder, Ice, Turbo and Diamond. The Maze and Swingshot were the two new events that were added. Also, this season, one of 2 new segments where fans could write in and Ask A Gladiator a question and the other one was were the Gladiators recalled moments in their Gladiator history that most impressed them called Gladiator Moments. The 1st Half winners were Kimberly Lenz and Mark Ortega while Kristi Kropp and Tim Goldrick were 1st Half runner-ups. The 2nd Half winners were Kathy Mollica and Joseph Mauro while Susan Stencil and Darrell Gholar were 2nd Half runner-ups. Mark and Kathy won over Joseph and Kimberly for the Grand Championship.
    A special Pro-Football Challenge of Champions debuted. Charles White, former Los Angeles Rams & Cleveland Browns running back won over Greg Pruitt, Phill Villapiano, Jim Kiick, Cliff Branch and Jack Ham. The 4th Season: added two new events called Sky Track and Super Powerball as well as seven new Gladiators. Sky, Elektra, Sabre, Cyclone, Siren, Havoc, Lace #2 and Atlas joined Zap, Laser, Diamond, Turbo, Tower, Storm and Viper.
    The 1st Half winners were Betsy Erickson and Cliff Miller while Ted LePage and Annette McBride were the runner-ups. The 2nd Half winners were Cheryl Wilson and Marty DePaoli with Katy Ramsey and Kevin Weber as the runner-ups. Cliff and Cheryl defeated Marty and Betsy to win the Grand Championship for Season 5.
    Returning this season were three special Challenge edition episodes. The Pro Football Challenge of Champions II, Charles White defended his title against Tony Dorsett, Seth Joyner, Mark Clayton, Drew Hill and Wesley Walker.
    The Gold Medal Challenge of Champions with former Olympics Athletes debuted. Cathy Turner, 1992 Gold & Silver Speed Skating and Bill Johnson, 1984 Gold Downhill Skiing emerged as the winners over Alice Brown, Nancy Lieberman, Danny Manny and Tyrell Biggs.
    This year, the first ever International Challenge of Champions debuted. Peggy Odita from Nigeria and Dan Franke from USA emerged as the winners over Denise Sharps from USA, Yemi Alade-Fa from Nigeria, Lia Lourens & Berend Veneberg from Holland, Weininger Irwin & Vanda Fairchild from Great Britian, Verena Huenh & Uwe Knebel from Germany & Takahiro Kondo & Janet Moon from South Korea. Beginning with the 5th Season, major changes happened as the American Gladiators' set got a make over. Four new events; the Gauntlet, Tug-O-War, Whiplash and the Pyramid were added to the competition. Five new Gladiators Hawk, Jazz, Tank, Rebel and Dallas joined Zap, Laser, Turbo, Tower, Sky, Sabre, Siren and the return of Ice as well as a new co-host, Lisa Malosky, for Mike Adamle.
    The 1st Half winners were Kimberly Tyler and Wesley Berry while Cathy Marino and Sean Goodwin were the runner-ups. The 2nd Half winners were Peggy Odita and Troy Jackson while Donna Toyeba and Joseph Edwards were the runner-ups. In the Grand Championships, Peggy and Wesley defeated Kimberly and Troy.
    The Armed Forces Challenge debuted pitting the American Gladiators against the best of the Marines; Loretta Vandenberg & Freddie Thompson, the Air Force; Katherine Smith & Max McDonald, the Army; Laura Kerr & James Sparrow and the Navy; Kristin Keidel & Carl Packer.
    The Gold Medal Challenge of Champions II was issued and Michele Mitchell-Rocha & Mitch Gaylord emerged as winners over Valerie Brisco, Mark Breland, Mel Stewart & Betty Okino. Due to the growing popularity of American Gladiators throughout the world, the 2nd International Challenge debuted with contenders coming from the Bahamas, Japan as well as the Grand Championship winners from the British and Finland Gladiators shows. Michael Sidney of the USA & Minna Karhu of Finland were crowned as the 2nd International Champions.
    The 6th Season debuted a new event called Snapback as well as the Gauntlet, Tug-O-War, Whiplash, Pyramid, Powerball, Breakthrough and Conquer, Hang Tough, the Wall, the Assault, the Joust, Swingshot, Skytrack and the Eliminator.
    Nitro returned to the Gladiator line up consisting of Zap, Laser, Ice, Turbo, Sky, Siren, Sabre, Hawk & Jazz. This year there were 14 qualifying rounds. The best times out of these round were then picked to head to get the contenders into the Semifinals then into the Crunch Time Event debuted which is where the Contenders points were ... as well as the Gladiator Newsflash. Adrienne Sullivan & Kyler Storm were Season 7 Grand Championships while Liz Ragland & Daniel Cunningham were the runner ups.
    This season had 6 different specials. In the 2nd Armed Forces Challenge, the Marines retained their title. The Gold Medal Challenge of Champions III saw the return of Mitch Gaylord retaining his title with Picabo Street winning over Bob Ctvrtlik & Debi Thomas. An All Star-Celebrity Challenge where Dean Cain & Debbe Dunning emerged the winners over John C. McGinley, Heidi Mark & American Gladiators Host Mike Adamle. The NYPD VS. the LAPD where Michael Diaz & Teresa Ogburn of the NYPD won over Arthur Tom & Angela Shepard of the LAPD. USC VS Notre Dame had former USC football players challenging former Notre Dame players. Charles White & Anthony Davis defeated Alan Pinkett & Vagas Ferguson. The Battle of the Best debuted with former Grand Champions from seasons past gathering to compete. Wesley Berry & Peggy Odita Season 6 Grand Champions were triumphant over Mark Ortega & Kathy Mollica Season 4 Grand Champions and Cliff Miller & Cheryl Wilson Season 5 Grand Champions. As the regular season finished, the American Gladiators ventured out; Internationally. Nitro, Ice, Sky, Sabre, Jazz & Hawk traveled over to London to The International Gladiators I to compete alongside fellow International Gladiators from Russia, Finland & Great Britain. Eunice Huthart & Wesley Berry are crowned the International Gladiators Champions with Kim Tyler & Paul Field coming in as runner-ups.
    Also debuting this year was Gladiators 2000 which pitted teens against each other while testing their knowledge on health and fitness. 4 of the American Gladiators would mentor and compete with the teens throughout the show. Events included the Assault; where the opposing teams' Gladiator Adviser had to run through the Assault battlefield, the Wall, the Food Pyramid; which consisted of items from the 5 basic food groups and the Slingshot. The teams' which consisted of a boy and girl, earned extra points after events where they were asked a question about what the Gladiator had just taught them. The final event was the Eliminator, which was smaller in where the kids had to answer questions before moving on through the obstacle. Half way through, they would tag their partner who would then continue on through the rest of the course. They would get 25 points for each question they answered correctly and and extra bonus for the fastest time. Peggy Odita came back to referee while Ryan Seacrest and Maria Sansone hosted the show. The 7th Season. Only a couple things changed for this season. Dan Clark, aka Nitro, was now co-hosting with Mike. Events; Snapback, the Gauntlet, Tug-O-War, Whiplash, Pyramid, Powerball, Breakthrough and Conquer, Hang Tough, the Wall, the Assault, the Joust, Swingshot, Skytrack and the Eliminator stayed the same as well as the Gladiator line up of Laser, Ice, Turbo, Sky, Siren, Sabre, Hawk & Jazz. There were 5 special that came out this year. Playboy Models vs Underwear Models Challenge were Tom Hintnaus & Rebecca Ferratti win over Tracy James & Renee Tenison Baywatch vs Lifeguard Remy Smith & Jenny Susser win over David Chokachi & Gena Lee Nolin Celebrity Pro Football Challenge crowned Debbe Dunning & Roger Craig over Jennifer Flavin & Chris Mims. The winners received $10,000 for the charity of their choice. Battle of the Best II crowned for a 2nd year in a row, Peggy Odita & Wesley Berry over Adrienne Sullivan & Kyler Storm. Alumni Show were Zap challenged Dallas. The experience over the youth.
    In the second season of Gladiators 2000, Valerie Rae Miller became the new co-host. The Gladiators were reduced down to 1 per team The Events: Powerball: Contestants stuff plastic balls into 5 cylinders while the 3 Gladiators defend them by tackling, wrestling the contender or knocking them out of bounds. The Assault: Contestant weaves around through an obstacle course attempting to shoot a bulls-eye above the Gladiator who is shooting at them from a cannon with tennis balls. Breakthrough and Conquer: A no-holds-barred hybrid of one-on-one football and sumo wrestling. In Breakthrough, the contender carries a football attempting to score past the Gladiator. In the Conquer Ring, the contender attempts to remove the Gladiator out of the ring. The Joust: The contestant wielding a pugel stick attempting to knock the Gladiator off of a bridge/pedestal. Human Cannonball: The Gladiator stands on an elevated platform and tries to avoid getting knocked off by a contestant flying at them on a rope swing.
    The Wall: The contenders climb a 32 foot Wall and the Gladiators chase after them in an attempt to pull them off. Atlasphere: Contestants roll around in a giant metal ball attempting to score points while the Gladiators defends the goals. Hang Tough: Contenders swing on a grid of rings in an attempt to get to the other platform while Gladiator pursues. Swingshot: Contestants bungee jump up to a pole and grab scoring balls while the Gladiators attempt to stop them. The Maze: Contenders race through the Maze to the finish but the Gladiators throughout attempt to stop or slow them down. Skytrack: A 20 feet upside-down race track where the contenders and the Gladiators race to the finish line. Super Powerball: Like Powerball, contestants stuff plastic balls into 3 cylinders while only 2 Gladiators defend them. Gauntlet: Contenders have 25 seconds to run through an 80-foot long, half pipe, open field lined with Gladiators stationed in five active combat zones attempts to stop them with a varied armory of weapons. Pyramid: Contestants have 60 seconds to climb and navigate a steep 35-foot pyramid, made of padding, attempting to reach top while avoiding 2 Gladiators stationed to prevent them from reaching their goal. Tug-O-War: Contestants compete against a Gladiator on a tilting platforms spaced 10 feet apart and raise 15 feet above the mats. The contender has to pull the rope to their side or pull the Gladiator off their platform. Whiplash: The contenders and Gladiators battle in a total battle of body strength. Each grab onto a triangle shaped dog bone and the contender attempts to rip it out of the Gladiators hand or force them outside of the playing mat. Snapback: Contestant and Gladiator were connected to a bungee cord were the contestant tried to score points and the Gladiator attempted to stop them. The final event was an obstacle course called the Eliminator. Each contestant battled each other in an attempt to finish first. Through out the years, the Eliminator has gone through many changes in appearance, from rolling balls up ramps to climbing over walls to a zip line to the final straight away. The show started out on the CBS/Fox Network and then moved to the USA network. Most of the first two seasons were taped at Universal Studios Hollywood. In 1991, they moved to CBS/MTM Studios. International episodes were taped in Birmingham, England, home of the British version. The show was produced by Trans World International with Four Point Entertainment and was distributed by Samuel Goldwyn Television.moreless
  • 93
    Remington Steele

    Remington Steele

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    NBC (ended 1987)
    Try this for a deep, dark secret. The great detective Remington Steele? He doesn't exist. I invented him. Follow.

    I always loved excitement, so I studied and apprenticed, and put my name on an office. But absolutely nobody knocked down my door. A female private investigator seemed so . . . feminine. So I invented a superior. A decidedly masculine superior.

    Suddenly, there were cases around the block. It was working like a charm. Until the day he walked in.

    With his blue eyes and mysterious past, and before I knew it, he assumed Remington Steele's identity.

    Now I do the work and he takes the bows.

    It's a dangerous way to live, but as long as people buy it, I can get the job done.

    We never mix business with pleasure. Well, almost never. I don't even know his real name.

    ============== Company credits:

    Production Companies * MTM Enterprises Inc. Distributors * National Broadcasting Company (NBC) (original airing) * United American Video (UAV) (1993) (USA) (VHS) Other Companies * Inter Video 24 frame video playback * Silver Chalice Productions European production coordination =============== Awards: Edgar Allan Poe Awards 1984 -- Nominated -- Best Television Episode -- Jeff Melvoin (For episode "Altered Steele".) 1983 -- Won -- Best Television Episode -- Joel Steiger (For episode "In the Steele Of The Night".) Emmy Awards 1985 -- Nominated -- Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series -- Doris Roberts ================= Crazy Credits: At the end of the credits, the MTM kitten wears a Sherlock Holmes deerstalker cap and meerschaum pipe. While meowing, the pipe drops out of its mouth and falls in front of the word "Productions" =============== Release dates: USA -- 1 October 1982 UK -- 3 September 1983 France -- 13 November 1983 Sweden -- 24 February 1984 ======================= Filming Locations:

    ABC Entertainment Center - 2040 Avenue of the Stars, Century City, Los Angeles, California, USA

    Century City, Los Angeles, California, USA (Century Plaza Towers) La Valetta, Malta (episodes "Maltese Steele", "Puzzled Steele") Santa Clarita, California, USA Sun Valley, Los Angeles, California, USA University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA ========================moreless
  • 94
    This is Your Life (UK)

    This is Your Life (UK)

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    BBC (ended 2003)
    Each week, a celebrity guest of honour is surprised and presented with a 'Red Book' by the show host. The host conducts a biography of the guest with the help of family members, friends, and acquaintances.moreless
  • 95
    Mystery Science Theater 3000

    Mystery Science Theater 3000

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    Comedy Central (ended 1999)
    This is a show about an evil experiment where a guy is trapped on a satellite and is forced to watch bad films. He is forced to do this by Mad Scientists, who want to find a movie so bad that they can inflict it on the world and take over. We see the movie with the subject (Joel or later Mike) and his robot pals Crow and Servo, in silhouette at the bottom of the screen making jokes and wisecracks during the movie.

    Episodes: 197 color episodes, 9 specials, 1 unaired pilot, and 3 direct-to-video releases. Production Company: Best Brains, Inc.

    MST3K Broadcast History 1988-1989 -- KTMA TV 23, Minneapolis, MN 1989-1991 -- The Comedy Channel 1991-1996 -- Comedy Central 1997-1999 -- Sci-Fi Channel

    MST3K Syndication History MST3K was in syndication for only one year: from September 1995 to September 1996. During this time, several episodes from seasons 2, 3, and 4 aired on local network affiliate stations.

    MST3K Re-Run History After production of new episodes ended in 1999, Sci-Fi Channel continued to show re-runs of MST3K on Saturday mornings for several years. They stopped showing reruns in early 2004, with the last one airing on 1/31/04.

    MST3K commercially available episodes On DVD: 20 episodes from seasons 1-6, 3 episodes from season 8, 1 episode from season 9, 4 episodes from season 10. On VHS: 21 episodes from seasons 1-6, 1 episode from season 9, 3 episodes from season 10. See episode guide for exactly which episodes are available. "MST3K: The Movie": is available on VHS only. The DVD has been out of print for years. A new updated version was released in May 2008.

    MST3K Marathons 1991- 1st Annual Turkey Day marathon (30 hours) Theme: Dr. Forrester is trying to take over the world by forcing 30 hours of the world's worst films upon the earth. Meanwhile, Frank is trying to prepare Thanksgiving dinner. 1992- 2nd Annual Turkey Day marathon (30.5 hours) Theme: Dr. Forrester is force-feeding Frank 30 turkeys, each one dressed in the of a bad movie. 1993- 3rd Annual Turkey Day marathon (32 hours) Hosted by MST3000 fans at a Halloween party with by Debbie Tobin. 1994- 4th Annual Turkey Day marathon (28 hours) Hosted by Adam West. 1995- 5th Annual Turkey Day marathon (14.5 hours) Theme: Dr. Forrester must try to take over the world while entertaining guests that Frank invited for Thanksgiving.

    MST3K Conventions 1989 - "1st MiSTy Confab". Featured stand up from the show's cast, a showing of the never-aired pilot, and a display of some props. 1992 - "MST Alive". Live riffing of the film World Without End at the Downtown Theater in Minneapolis. Also short intro pieces featuring Dr. Forrester and TV's Frank. 1994 - "Conventio-Con-Expo-Fest-a-Rama". Featured prop museum, merchandise sale, viewing rooms that showed all episodes from seasons 1-5, keynote session featuring Q and A from the shows writers and cast, speeches by Beverly Garland, David Worth, and John Humphries, and autograph session, and a live riffing of the film This Island Earth, and a costume ball. 1996 - "Conventio-Con II: Electric Boogaloo". Featured a keynote session with the entire show's cast (including Trace Beaulieu, who had recently announced his departure from the show and Bill Corbett, who had just joined the cast), a celebrity panel with Kim Cattrall, Russel Johnson (TV's Professor), and Rex Reason, there were showings of scenes cut from MST3K: The Movie, as well as a showing of the short Assignment: Venezuela, there was a Doom competition where fans could play against Mike, and a shopping spree with Bridget Jones and Mary Jo Pehl.

    MST3K Awards and Award Nominations 1992-Nominated for Cable ACE Award for Best Comedy Series. 1993-Nominated for Cable ACE Award for Best Writing in a Comedy Series. 1993-Awarded 1993 Peabody Award for Outstanding Programming. 1994-Nominated for the following Cable ACE Awards: Art Direction in a Comedy Series, Best Comedy Series, Best Writing in a Comedy Series. 1994-Nominated for Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing in a Music or Variety Program. 1995-Nominated for Cable ACE Award for Best Comedy Series. 1995-Nominated for Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing in a Music or Variety Program. 1996-Nominated for Cable ACE Award for Best Comedy Series. 1997-Nominated for Cable ACE Award for Best Comedy Series.moreless
  • 96
    Garfield & Friends

    Garfield & Friends

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    CBS (ended 1994)
    Based on the highly popular comic strip by Jim Davis, Garfield and Friends was considered the best long-running cartoon on CBS. This Saturday morning series featured the adventures of that lovable, hungry fat cat Garfield, his yellow dog friend Odie, and their cartoonist bachelor master Jon Arbuckle. Garfield cartoons shared the spot with a new cartoon series created for this series called U.S. Acres (also based on a comic strip by Jim Davis). U.S. Acres was a cartoon about a group of barnyard animals who run a farm. The leader was Orson Pig, the bookish and perceptive pig. His friends had many different qualities: Wade Duck was the scaredy-cat duck who runs away from everything, no kidding; Booker was a crafty little chick whose main goal was to chase a worm, and his brother Sheldon was nothing more than an egg with two legs sticking out; Roy Rooster was the practical joking rooster who puts everyone in trouble with his jokes; and two sheep, Bo and Lanolin, were always bickering with each other about nearly everything. Bo being a nice guy and Lanolin a cruel girl. Each episode, they had to protect the farm from Orson's big bad brothers and a crafty weasel. Before this series, Garfield cartoons were shown as yearly specials on CBS, and the specials were so great that CBS decided to turn Garfield into a cartoon series. In the first season, each 30-minute episode was packed with three 8-minute shorts, two Garfield shorts and one U.S. Acres short. In the second season, Garfield and Friends expanded to an hour, consisting of four Garfield cartoons and two U.S. Acres cartoons. It remained at this format until the show ended in 1994. 'Garfield:The Movie' was released on June 11,2004 & so far has made over $75 million at the box office. Thanks to the success of the movie, 20th Century Fox is now working on a CGI/live action movie version of 'Alvin & The Chipmunks' & coming to theathers on December 25th is 'Fat Albert', which is of course a live action version of the classic 1974-1984 cartoon 'Fat Albert & The Cosby Kids'. DVD Releases Garfield As Himself - June 29,2004 Garfield & Friends Volume One - July 27,2004 Garfield:The Movie - October 19th,2004 Garfield's Holiday Celebrations - October 26th,2004 Garfield & Friends Volume Two - December 7th,2004 Garfield's Travel Adventures- February 15,2005 Garfield & Friends Volume Three- April 19th,2005 TV Theme Lyrics! (from Seasons 1-2): Ladies and Gentleman, Garfield & Friends Friends Are There To Help You Get Started, To Give You A Push On Your Way Friends Are There To Turn You Around, Get Your Feet On The Ground For A Brand New Day They'll Pick You Up When You're Down Help You Swallow Your Pride When Something Inside's Got To Break On Through To The Other Side Friends Are Someone You Can Open Up To When You Feel Like You're Ready To Flip When You Got The World On Your Shoulders Friends Are There To Give You A Tip Friends Are There When You Need Them Their Even There When You Don't For A Walk In The Park, For A Shot In The Dark Friends Are There (garfield) I Don't Care But Friends Will Care For You-u-u-u-u-u-u! (different dialogue for each show) TV Theme Lyrics! (effective from Season 3-7): Ladies and Gentleman, Garfield & Friends We're (We're) ready (ready) to (to) party! (let's go!) We're ready to party, we're ready! I hope you bring lot's of spaghetti! (don't forget) Come on in , come to the place where fun never ends! Come on in, it's time to party with Garfield and friends! Dancing , Fiesta! , Romancing, Siesta! , Samba , La Bamba, Eye Carumba! Disguises (Disguises) Surprises (Surprises) and pies of,(and pies of) All sizes! Come on in, come to the place where fun never ends. Come on in, it's time to party with Garfield and Friends! Garfield and friends! -Garfield says something funny-moreless
  • 97
    Allo! Allo!

    Allo! Allo!

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    BBC (ended 1992)
    Meet René, the most wanted man in Occupied France: Women want his body. The Resistance wants his brain. And the Nazis want his sausage! In a small café in occupied France the harassed proprietor, René, is fighting his own war. With the German Army in residence at the bar, René is risking his neck to aid the Resistance by hiding two British airmen and a radio transmitter upstairs. As if this wasn't enough, René has also got involved in hiding a priceless painting in a garlic sausage, which even now is being sniffed out by the Gestapo. But René's real problem is his wife, Edith, and what she will do to him when she finds out about the affairs he is having with two sexy waitresses! (BBC)moreless
  • 98
    WWE Pay-Per-View

    WWE Pay-Per-View

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    Every Wrestlemania, Every Summerslam, Every Survivor Series, Every Royal Rumble, and BEYOND, can be found on this guide.
  • 99
    America's Most Wanted

    America's Most Wanted

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    FOX (ended 2011)
    America's Most Wanted is not only the longest-running TV series in the history of the FOX network but the eighth-longest running prime time network show ever and credited for bringing reality television to mainstream. The idea for the show came from other reality crime shows in the 60s and 80s. By the summer of 1987, FOX executive Stephen Chao and Executive Producer Michael Linder had the idea for America's Most Wanted. It premiered on February 7, 1988 and within four days of the first broadcast convicted killer David James Roberts was captured. The show was canceled for a month and a half in the fall of 1996 but returned after protests from the public, law enforcement, government officials and low ratings for the shows replacing America's Most Wanted.

    Now in it's 22nd season, America's Most Wanted has captured 1057 fugitives and recovered 59 missing persons. The toll-free-hotline number to report any tips on any case featured on the show is 1-800-CRIME-TV (1-800-274-6388).

    Show Times Sunday 7:00-7:30(1988-1989) Friday 7:00-8:00(1990-1992) Tuesday 8:00-9:00(1993) Saturday 8:00-9:00(1994-present) Show Titles America's Most Wanted(1988-1996) America's Most Wanted: America Fights Back(1996-2003) America's Most Wanted(2003-present)

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    The Young Riders

    The Young Riders

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    ABC (ended 1992)
    The Young Riders is a romantic western TV series that ran for three seasons from 1989 to 1992 and is directed by Ed Spielman. The series is set right before the beginning of the American Civil War and focuses on a Pony Express station in Sweetwater, Kansas. At the Pony Express station, several young riders are responsible for delivering the mail. Riders employed at the station include William F. Cody "Buffalo Bill" (Stephen Baldwin), James Butler (Josh Brolin), Ike McSwain (Travis Fine), Running Buck Cross (Greg Rainwater), The Kid (Ty Miller) and Lou McCloud (Yvonne Suhor). The series follows the riders as they encounter difficult tasks including interpersonal problems with each other and dangerous delivery conditions in order to deliver the mail. Rachel Dunne (Clare Wren) and Emma Shannon (Melissa Leo) act as the house mothers of the Pony Express and attempt to care for the riders and provide interference amongst the riders when tensions boil over.moreless
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