• 181
    The Primetime Emmy Awards

    The Primetime Emmy Awards

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    CBS
    Once a year, television's royalty gathers together for a ceremony honoring the best of the best of primetime TV. Shows, actors, and writers are all given a chance to take home a coveted Emmy statue--but in order to win, they must pass the mysterious and rigorous selection process of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Millions of people tune in to watch each year's ceremony and find out if their favorite shows and actors have been recognized or ignored, and the results can often make or break a series or career. The Emmy statue, depicting a winged woman holding an atom, was developed in 1948 by Louis McManus. The statue is meant to signify the arts, through the female figure, and the sciences, through the atom. The name for the award is taken from "Immy," a slang term for "image orthicon tube," an ingredient of many early television cameras. Since the figure is female, "Emmy" seemed more suitable to the Academy.moreless
  • 182
    The Powerpuff Girls

    The Powerpuff Girls

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    Cartoon Network (ended 2009)
    Created by Craig McCracken, The Powerpuff Girls has become popular with a broad audience. The Powerpuff Girls first incarnation was as a project for Craig McCracken's college class at The California Arts Institution in 1992. Three years later, the crew at Cartoon Network saw it and gave it its first pilot in 1995. Later on in the following year, The Powerpuff Girls had their second pilot, and finally a TV series in 1998.

    The show is about three little girls who were created in a laboratory experiment by Professor Utonium, who combined sugar, spice, and everything nice in an effort to create the perfect little girl. However, the professor accidentally added some "Chemical X" into the mix, and the three girls were born from the resulting explosion. With their super charged powers, they challenge the forces of evil so that justice will prevail.

    The Powerpuff Girls is one of Cartoon Network's original animated series and is part of the collection known as Cartoon Cartoons.

    The Powerpuff Girls is one of Cartoon Network's highest rating shows.

    Craig McCracken is also the creator of Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends.

    Show Info:

    Rated: TV Y-7

    Show Times:

    The show's schedule changes often. Check Cartoon Network for the latest schedule.

    As of November 27th, 2004, the show airs on:

    Saturdays

    Cartoon Network @ 3:30 a.m. E & P

    Characters:

    Blossom - According to the closing credits' theme song, Blossom is "commander and the leader" of the Powerpuff Girls. The most intelligent and intellectual one of them all, she comes up with most of the plans to defeat the villains. She has very long red hair. At times she can be bossy but she always finds a way to keep her sisters from fighting each other. Her element is everything nice.

    Bubbles - Bubbles is "the joy and the laughter" of the group. As the sweetest one of all, she is overly sensitive and just hates to fight with her sisters. Even though she may seem bubbly on the outside she really is tough on the inside and proves at times to be hardcore as her sisters. Her element is sugar.

    Buttercup - Buttercup is "the toughest fighter." Her philosophy is to fight first and ask questions later. She is the most eager to defeat the villains on their missions. Though she seems tough all the time, she does have a sensitive side to her, which she rarely shows. Her element is spice.

    Professor Utonium - The creator of The Powerpuff Girls, Professor Utonium is their father-figure who guides, teaches, and loves the girls.

    Mojo Jojo - The most maniacal of all the villains, Mojo hates The Powerpuff Girls with a vengeance. He used to be known simply as Jojo, the Professor's lab assistant, but after The Powerpuff Girls' birth, the chemicals that created them affected him as well and mutated his brain. Ever since then, he's dedicated his life to crushing them and the world that loves them.

    Him - Known as the evilest of evil, Him is a devil figure who despises The Powerpuff Girls. His plans to destroy them are typically the most psychologically twisted, but he always fails in his efforts.

    Fuzzy Lumpkins - A country hillbilly. Fuzzy doesn't really care about world domination or taking over Townsville. He just wants people off his property, and turns into a dangerous monster that the girls must fight when anyone violates his personal space.

    Princess Morebucks - A spoiled brat with a rotten temper. Princess is rich and gets anything she wants -- but when she meets The Powerpuff Girls, having super powers is what she wants most but can never have. She uses technology to act duplicitous, in hopes of either joining or destroying the Powerpuff Girls, but her efforts always fail.

    The Mayor - The dumb, but lovable ruler of Townsville. He mindlessly watches over Townsville and when there's trouble he uses the hotline and alerts the Powerpuff Girls right away.

    Ms. Bellum - The beautiful brains behind the Mayor. Whenever the Mayor does something stupid, she corrects it. He would be lost without her. She is also an important female role model for the Powerpuff Girls. In many ways, Ms. Bellum and the Powerpuff Girls are the most powerful people in Townsville.

    Ms. Keane - A teacher at Pokey Oaks Kindergarten who is a mentor to The Powerpuff Girls. She is gentle and kind, and when there are problems in the oom, she shows The Powerpuff Girls a better solution without violence.

    The Amoeba Boys - Three villains that desperately try to come up with crimes worthy of getting the Powerpuff Girls attention, so they can be considered super villains and go to jail. But they're just amoebas, and their efforts never really come to much.

    The Gang Green Gang - A gang comprised of 5 mutated green-skinned teens. Their names are Ace, Big Billy, Grubber, Snake, and Lil' Arturo. Unlike most villains they are not that concerned about taking over Townsville. They just love to commit petty crimes.

    Sedusa - Yet another villain, Sedusa is a medusa-like figure who has snake-like hair, the source of her superpowers. She is a master of disguise who uses her feminine wiles to seduce men into giving her want she wants and escaping crimes.

    The Rowdyruff Boys - The evil male counterparts of The Powerpuff Girls, these three boys were originally created by Mojo Jojo, using snips, snails, and puppy-dog tails, which he mixed together in a disgusting prison toilet. Their powers are a fairly even match for the girls.



    Awards & Nominations:

    2005 Annie Awards - Character Design in an Animated Television Production (Nominated)

    2004 Annie Awards - Outstanding Character Design in an Animated Television Production (Nominated)

    2003 Annie Awards - Outstanding Character Design in an Animated Television Production (Nominated)

    2001 Kids' Choice Awards - Favorite Cartoon (Nominated)

    2001 Annie Awards - Outstanding Individual Achievement for Music Score an Animated Television Production (Won!) - Outstanding Individual Achievement for Production Design in an Animated Television Production (Won!)

    2001 Emmy Awards - Outstanding Animated Program (For Programming Less Than One Hour) (Nominated)

    2000 Annie Awards - Outstanding Individual Achievement for Writing in an Animated Television Production (Nominated)

    2000 Emmy Awards - Outstanding Individual Achievement in Animation (Won!) - Outstanding Animated Program (For Programming One Hour or Less) (Nominated)

    1999 Annie Awards - Outstanding Individual Achievement for Directing in an Animated Television Production (Nominated) - Outstanding Individual Achievement for Production Design in an Animated Television Production (Nominated) - Outstanding Individual Achievement for Voice Acting in an Animated Television Production (Nominated)

    1999 Emmy Awards - Outstanding Animated Program (For Programming One Hour or Less) (Nominated)

    More Details

    Theme Lyrics:

    Main Theme

    (Narration) Sugar Spice and everything Nice

    These are the ingredients to the perfect little girl.

    But Professor Utonium accidentally added one ingredient to the concoction: Chemical X

    EXPLOSION

    Thus, the Powerpuff Girls were born. Using their ultra superpowers, Blossom, Bubbles, and Buttercup have dedicated their lives to fighting crime and the forces of evil!

    End Lyrics (by BiS)

    Blossom, commander and the leader Bubbles, she is the joy and the laughter Buttercup, she is the toughest fighter Powerpuffs save the day!

    Fighting crime, trying to save the world Here they come just in time The Powerpuff Girls!

    Fighting crime, trying to save the world Here they come just in time The Powerpuff Girls!

    POWERPUFF!! The Powerpuff Girls now air on Boomerang.moreless
  • 183
    NYPD Blue

    NYPD Blue

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    ABC (ended 2005)
    "This police drama contains adult language and scenes with partial nudity. Viewer discretion is advised." The potential images those words created alone caused more controversy for this series, before it had even premiered. The "Bible Belt" was up in arms and no-one had even seen an episode. In most of those southern states the local ABC affiliates refused to carry the show, which was a shame because aside from a "little" bare flesh and a couple of harsh words, they missed out on a quality television show. Of course it wasn't long before they realized it really was no big deal. Late during the first season, Steven Bochco said during an acceptance speech at the 20th Annual People's Choice Awards: "In spite of those who seek to legislate what we can and cannot see on our own television sets in the privacy of our own homes. NYPD Blue has succeeded because the American people, properly so, prefer to judge for themselves." At those awards the show was voted "favorite new television dramatic series" and "favorite television dramatic series" the first year it was eligible. The show has been nominated for and won numerous awards. Check out this IMDb link for more information. Most notably the series has been nominated for an Emmy 84 times and has won 20 of those times and Dennis Franz has claim to four of those statues. Before this series, some of the stars had an affiliation with Steven Bochco from his previous highly acclaimed series Hill Street Blues. David Caruso had guest starred in two episodes and during the 3rd season, Dennis Franz guest starred as Det. Sal Benedetto in 5 episodes and was killed off in his last appearance. Franz officially joined the cast in that show's 6th season as Lt. Norman Buntz and stayed with the show until it ended. Then the Buntz character was brought back for a short-lived comedy series called Beverly Hills Buntz the following season. This series didn't last because it was erratically scheduled as a fill-in and then couldn't build an audience. James McDaniel also appeared in a Hill Street Blues episode and then also appeared in Steven Bochco's attempt at something new, a musical police drama called Cop Rock. When Caruso left early on in the series, another Bochco veteran was called upon; Jimmy Smits who played Victor Sifuentes on Bochco's L.A. Law was brought in to play new detective Bobby Simone. While other actors have left with big screen ambitions, two actors have left the series to move onto other Bochco created programs. In 1996 there was an attempt to launch a comedy that featured as one of the characters in the ensemble PAA John Irvin played by Bill Brochtrup. Public Morals only aired one episode and was pulled. I would hesitate to call it a spin-off, since only one (at that time) minor character from this series appeared on it, but I suppose an argument could be made. After all, Dennis Franz did take his Norman Buntz character from Hill Street Blues to Beverly Hills Buntz, a comedy series that lasted much longer than Public Morals did. Bill Brochtrup returned back to the 15th and made several guest appearances before becoming a full cast member in the 6th season. In 2001 Kim Delaney left this series (with a loophole that would allow her to come back) to star in Philly. That series wasn't too long lived and Det. Russell has subsequently returned for a guest spot or two. While this cast has undergone a rotation of lead actors, Dennis Franz was the glue that held this series together. Most of the show's run was at Tuesdays at 10pm ET on ABC. The show was simulcast in HDTV. With the 2000-2001 TV season, the show became ABC's first regularly scheduled entertainment series to be broadcast in high definition. First air date: September 21, 1993 Last air date: March 1, 2005 Original air time: Tuesday 10:00:00 pm (Eastern)moreless
  • 184
    Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel

    Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel

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    HBO
    This is a unique sports show that covers a lot of stories other people wont. Correspondents conduct investigations and interviews to tell a story or expose corruption.
  • 185
    Arthur

    Arthur

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    PBS
    Arthur Read, the spectacular bespectacled aardvark stars in this children's series about growing up. Typical childhood problems such as bratty siblings, schoolyard bullies and classroom cliques are addressed by this popular program. Arthur's seventeenth season has come to a close. However, watch for repeats again soon on your local PBS station. And keep watching for more details on upcoming episodes of the program. Currently, Arthur is the second longest-running North American animated series (behind The Simpsons), now with seventeen seasons and counting. Developed from Marc Brown's beloved books, Arthur reminds us all of how it feels to be 8 years old. Just like your average kid, Arthur overcomes the dreaded obstacles of third-grade life, such as his tough teacher Mr. Ratburn, bullies, and mountains of homework. At home, Arthur must face the pint- terror also known as his sister Dora Winifred, or D.W. for short. Everything between these two is a struggle; who gets control of the television remote, who can play their Crazy Bus CD, whose hobbies are dumber, that's a baby show...Will Arthur ever win one of these pointless arguments? Probably never, because not only is D.W. fiercely independent, she's also very smart. But despite it all, Arthur and D.W. are still brother and sister, and when they're not arguing, they can accomplish great things together.

    Keeping Arthur sane are his helpful friends --- an assortment of colorful animal cohorts who always provide sound advice and a few laughs too. They are: Francine Frensky (a tomboy who would rather play sports than go to the mall), Buster Baxter (an enthusiastic gourmand), Alan "The Brain" Powers (a bona-fide 3rd grade genius, who even writes computer programs in his spare time), Muffy Crosswire (the rich girl with a real heart of gold), and Sue Ellen Armstrong (a traveler of the world and geography expert). Arthur can also sometimes be seen with Fern Walters (a soft-spoken musician with semi-hidden goth interests), Binky Barnes (acts like a bully, but enjoys pastimes such as ballet and clarinet), George Nordgren / Lundgren (a somewhat shy moose who be truly entertaining when he tries), Prunella (who supposedly has psychic powers and is actually in the fourth grade) and Jenna Morgan (a rarely seen cat-girl.) And of course, who could forget Pal, Arthur's lovable, loyal pet pooch?

    Arthur airs on PBS every weekday and on some stations on weekends --- check local listings for time. Or, go to the PBS Kids' Arthur schedule to find out which episode is airing in a city near you.

    A large number of Arthur stories have been released on DVD and video. Many episodes are also available in book form. There are also a wealth of Arthur-related promotions and products, so keep an eye on the news and check online merchants such as eBay and Amazon, and your local stores. You can also check your local library for Arthur books.

    Theme Song

    Every day when you're walkin' down the street,
    Everybody that you meet, Has an original point of view...
    - Chorus: And I say "Hey!" (Hey!) What a wonderful kind of day! (Day!)
    If we can learn to work and play,(Play!) And get along with each other... -
    You've got to listen to your heart, Listen to the beat, Listen to the rhythm, the rhythm on the street,
    Open up your eyes, Open up your ears, Get together and make things better, By working together
    It's a simple message, and it comes from the heart, Believe in (believe in yourself...) 'Cuz that's the Place to START!
    - And I say "Hey!" (Hey!) What a wonderful kind of day! (Day!)
    If we can learn to work and play (PLAY!), And get along with each other (Hey!)
    What a wonderful kind of day Hey! What a wonderful kind of day...
    Hey! The series won 7 Emmy Awards for Outstanding Children's Animated Program, Outstanding Children's Animated Program, Outstanding Sound Mixing - Special Class, Outstanding Children's Animated Program, Outstanding Sound Mixing - Live Action and Animation, Outstanding Children's Animated Program and Outstanding Writing in an Animated Program.moreless
  • 186
    Wheel of Fortune

    Wheel of Fortune

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    Wheel of Fortune is in its 26th season (2008-2009 Season) with Pat Sajak & Vanna White. Wheel debuted in 1982.Wheel of Fortune has been renewed through the 2011-2012 season.

    One of the most successful game shows in history, Wheel of Fortune actually is a version of the children's game Hangman (with a large carnival wheel and prizes added). The game show, which did modestly well in the 1970s, became a worldwide phenomenon in the 1980s through syndication and made household names out of its hosts, Pat Sajak and Vanna White. Simply put, the Wheel has never stopped spinning since its premiere as an NBC daytime show that winter day in January 1975. (Ironically, the series replaced Jeopardy!, which later in 1984 when it returned, became its current companion in syndication.)

    The rules of the game Three contestants -- at various times during the run, including a returning champion -- compete. The host announces a category to a mystery puzzle (person, place, thing, phrase, quotation, event, landmark, occupation, etc.). The puzzle was originally contained on a three-tier, 36-space board (in 1981, changed to a four-tier, 52-space board; and in 1997, an all-electronic four-tier, 52-space board).

    The contestant selected to go first (by blind draw before the show) spin a large horizontally-situated carnival wheel containing dollar amounts and other spaces (including Bankrupt, Lose a Turn and Free Spin). If the contestant landed on a dollar amount, he/she could guess a letter thought to be in the puzzle; if it appeared, they received the cash multiplied by the number of times it appears in the puzzle (ergo, if the player guessed "T" after landing on $250, and "T" appeared twice, they received $500). An incorrect guess or landing on a penalty space (Bankrupt or Lose a Turn) caused control of the wheel to pass to the next contestant.

    At any point, the contestant in control of the wheel could spin again, ask to buy a vowel (at which point $250 was deducted from their score, and only if they had at least $250) or attempt to solve the puzzle; very early in the show's run, a player had to land on a Buy a Vowel space in order to buy a vowel, but this idea was scrapped before Wheel completed its first month on the air. The Bankrupt space caused the player to lose his accumulated winnings for that round (though all previous winnings were considered safe -- hence, "Once you buy a prize, it's yours to keep").

    If the player correctly guessed the puzzle's solution, he/she got to keep their accumulated winnings. Any contestant solving the puzzle and not having at least $100 (later $200 and still later, $500) was spotted that amount "on the house." Early rounds typically had lower dollar values on the wheel ($500 as a top space on round 1 early in the run/Bob Goen version, later that was changed to $750), but increased in subsequent rounds ($1,000 and $2,000 for the later rounds, to increase the excitement; $1,250 when Bob Goen hosted).

    Originally, the winnings were used to "go shopping" (i.e., purchase prizes) in one of the three revolving rooms on the set -- each containing: * Furniture -- enough to fill any room in the house, from the living room and dining room to bedroom or game room. * Appliances -- large and small, enough to make that dream kitchen or efficient laundry room. * Things for outside -- everything from swimming pools and patio furniture to barbecues, lawn games and garden equipment. * Clothing -- for every occasion. * Trips -- to any place imaginable, domestic or foreign. And don't forget the luggage and camera outfits. * Electronics -- TVs, stereos and much more! The show was among the first to offer early versions of VCRs (c. 1976), home video game units (c. 1978, Atari) and satellite dishes (late-1970s). * Gift Certificates -- everywhere to restaurants (Bonanza, Dairy Queen), clothing outlets (Casual Corner) and any other store (Western Auto). * Food -- from steaks from the Iowa Beef Council and chocolates to items from the Dessert of the Month Club. * Overall comfort and fun -- from a central air conditioning system and pinball machines to hot tubs and pizza parties. * Miscellaneous items -- everything from magazine subscriptions and collections of LPs from a record label to those famous ceramnic dalmations. and MUCH more.

    There were other announced prizes, usually worth much more than in the revolving rooms. While some prizes offered during the early years were no doubt unusual (such as rare antiques and African masks), the favorite prize, of course, were the cars. In the daytime show, there were two or three available, usually, a sports model (such as a Chevrolet Camaro) and an economy model (a Chevrolet Monza), but there were also more upmarket family cars (the Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme) and exotic foreign cars (a Lancia Beta coupe).

    Other top-ticket items proving popular were: * Other forms of transportation -- everything from boats, motorcycles and camping trailers. There was even, at one time, a 4-seat airplane and a motorhome available! * Furs -- before the animal rights groups got their way. * Jewelry -- everything from rings, necklaces, pearls, earrings, watches and much more!

    Starting in 1987 (primetime) and 1989 (daytime), the winner of a round received his accumulated bank in cash (thanks to beefs from contestants who had to pay steep taxes and preferred cash). During the shopping era, a contestant could elect to place any unused cash "on account" (which they could claim only upon winning a subsequent round AND avoiding the bankrupt space in the meantime); otherwise, unused winnings were placed on a gift certificate (usually to Gucci, Dicker and Dicker of Beverly Hills or another luxury shop seen on Rodeo Drive).

    If time ran short (signified by a series of "dings"), a "speed up" round was played, wherein the host gave the wheel one final spin, with vowels worth nothing and all consonants worth whatever the host landed on. The top-winning contestant after so many rounds completed within each show was the day's champion. In case of a tie, one of several things happened, depending on the year:

    * At first, all three players returned on the next show (even the third-place player). Everyone kept what they won on all shows. * Later, the two (or possibly all three) tied players played a one-round speedround to determine the champion. This format was used once the permanent bonus round was started.

    End Game - The Bonus Round At first, there was no bonus round, the top winner simply returned. Starting in 1981, the champion advanced to a bonus round, where they could select a prize (always worth $1,000 or more and signified with a gold star (or announced in some other way)) and, after choosing five consonants and one vowel, had 15 seconds to solve the puzzle.

    Prior to the bonus round becoming a permanent part of the game, there were several special weeks where bonus rounds were played. Games included (but not limited to):

    * 1975 hour-long format Bonus Round - Played during Wheel's short-lived 60-minute format, the day's overall winner selected one of four puzzles (labeled easy, medium, difficult and hard); the level of difficulty determined the prize (e.g., an easy puzzle may have been worth a TV-stereo console, while the difficult puzzle may have won the player a new Cadillac). The player then chose four consonants and a vowel and tried to solve the puzzle within 15 seconds. This is very similar to the current bonus round, except the level of difficulty did not necessarily correspond with the prize's value.

    * Any Prize in the House - The top winner simply chose a prize and they got it.

    * Star Bonus - By landing on a special token on the wheel, a contestant had the opportunity to advance to a special bonus round if they were one of the runners-up. That player could become champion by solving a puzzle and winning a prize that was worth more than the amount of the first-place player's lead. As with the 60-minute format's bonus round, the prize's value corresponded with the difficulty of the puzzle.

    This short-lived format wasn't always played, however, since the Star Bonus token sometimes wasn't landed on the entire show; the token could serve as insurance for a dominating player who wins the game (and possibly purchases the most-expensive prize, thereby making it unavailable for the opponents); or the expensive prize's value was not worth enough to cover the difference between the champion's winnings and his/her opponents.

    The rules of other games varied, but usually, the show had a bigger prize budget than during regular weeks.

    Changes through the years Many changes were made through the years, some very successful (luxury prizes in the syndicated version; $25,000 cash top bonus round prize), while others weren't (e.g., a "Doubler" token, which allowed contestants to double the potential value of the next spin; Rolf Benirschke as host of the daytime show; the infamous Megaword category, where a contestant had to correctly use the revealed word in a coherent sentence for an extra $500). Some of the more successful changes are detailed below.

    * For the syndicated version, decidedly luxury prizes were often advertised ("This $41,000 customized Cadillac Seville! "A $60,000 log cabin!" "A $25,000 trip around the world!"); plus a silver $5,000 space on the wheel's third round (replacing the $2,000 daytime show top space, though early syndicated shows had both the $2,000 and $5,000 spaces). Also, a bonus prize space was added in the second round of the syndicated show (and in 1987, a different bonus to the fourth round).

    * Meanwhile, in the daytime show, a "Jackpot" bonus space was added to the second round in 1987; it based at $1,000 and grew by $1,000 per show until claimed.

    * With the syndicated show's change to an all-cash format in 1987, the bonus round changed to having four (or sometimes, as many as six) grand prizes and $25,000 cash available as prizes. Originally meant to be a month-long promotion (the "Big Bonanza of Cash" before reverting to the tried-and-true post-puzzle shopping), this well-received format allowed more rounds – save for celebrity week gabfests, always at least four – to be played. Originally, the top wheel values were set thusly:

    - Round 1: $1,000. - Round 2: $2,500 (plus a bonus prize). - Round 3: $3,500. - Round 4-on: $5,000 (plus a bonus prize for Round 4 only, if time permits; sometimes, the bonus was used in Round 3 instead).

    This has since been changed, with the current setup as follows:

    - Round 1: $2,500, plus an $1,000 online shopping spree card that is placed on the wheel for the rest of the show a la the Free Spin, and may be picked up if a letter is correctly guessed. - Round 2: $3,500, plus a bonus prize, which remains on the wheel until a contestant picks it up. Until 2002, additional bonus prizes were placed on the wheel in subsequent rounds. – Round 3: $3,500, plus the Mystery Round spaces. - Round 4-on: $5,000, including the speed round.

    * During the 1988-1989 season, the contestant was given the six most popular letters -- R, S, T, L, N and E, and asked to select three more consonants and one vowel; the bonus round time limit was then shortened to 10 seconds.

    * Starting in 1989 (since $25,000 cash was far and away the most popular prize choice), the five grand prizes were placed in a blind draw, and could only be won once per week.

    * In 1996, the "returning champions" idea was scrapped, with a "Friday Finals" format instituted. Three new contestants appeared Monday through Thursday, with the week's top winners returning on Friday (regardless if they were their show's top winner) to play for a jackpot prize package. The latter format lasted only a couple of seasons before it, too, was scuttled.

    * In the 1990s, a Surprise space was added to the wheel, which was simply a prize that was announced only if won (usually a trip); this space has since been scrapped.

    * In the mid-1990s, a Jackpot round (third round initially, later the second round) allowed a contestant to claim an accumulating jackpot -- which based at $5,000 and accumulated with each dollar space landed on -- if they landed on a Jackpot space, correctly guessed a letter and solved the puzzle all in the same turn.

    * A few years after the jackpot round, a $10,000 space added to the wheel. The space was not multipliable; rather, it simply added $10,000 to the contestant's winnings if they solved the puzzle and avoided bankrupt. The space took up the center third of a standard wheel space, with two bankrupt spaces taking up the remainder (to add to the suspense). If the $10,000 part of the space was landed on and the contestant guessed correctly, it was placed face down in front of the contestant to read $10,000 (unlike the standard prize space, which was left face up).

    * "Toss Up" puzzles -- to determine who started the game -- were added prior to the first and fourth rounds, starting in the 2000-2001 season, each worth $1,000; a year later, two "Toss Up" puzzles were played, once before the contestant introductions and the second (now worth $2,000) to determine first round wheel control, with the pre-fourth round "Toss Up" now worth $3,000. If a contestant made an incorrect guess, he/she was out of the remainder of the puzzle; if all the letters were filled in or everyone guessed wrong, nobody won anything and wheel control began either with the left-most contestant or wherever it left off before.

    * During the 2000-2001 season, the "speed up" round was changed, wherein $1,000 was added to whatever dollar amount Sajak landed on. There was some cool music added, too.

    * Changes to the Bonus Round in October 2001. The contestant spun a mini- wheel containing 25 envelopes; Sajak removed the envelope; and win or lose, revealed the prize contained within (a car, $25,000 cash or a new top prize of $100,000; the top prize was contained in just one of the envelopes). In 2002-2003, more money amounts (one each of amounts between $30,000 and $50,000, each in $5,000 increments) were thrown into the mix. There have been at least five $100,000 winners and several others who have not been quite as fortunate.

    * Starting in 2002-2003, contestants who won nothing during the front game were given $500 just for playing (in addition to those lovely parting gifts).

    * A new Mystery space, added in the 2002-2003 season. Played in Round 3, two such spaces were placed on the wheel, with a $500 dollar value. Contestants landing on this space guessed a letter could either spin again or risk their accumulated bank, not knowing what's on the other side of the Mystery card. It could be Bankrupt or a new car (on occasion, it could be another prize, such as a $10,000 shopping spree). If it was a car, the contestant had to solve the puzzle and avoid the Bankrupt spaces to claim the car. The other Mystery space was then put out of play, becoming a regular $500 space. In September 2004, the values of the Mystery spaces dooubled to $1,000.

    A prize puzzle, added in the 2003-2004 season. One puzzle on each show (usually the second or third round) had some connection to a prize the contestant would win for solving the puzzle. For example, a contestant solving the puzzle "Check Your Local Listings" could win a plasma wall-screen television. The set underwent some revisions, too.

    Chuck and Susan and Pat and Vanna When the show started in 1975, Chuck Woolery was the host. For a brief time in the fall of 1979, Alex Trebek served as substitute host when Woolery took a leave of absence. In 1981, Woolery left for good when he was denied a pay raise (he wanted $500,000 per year, more than Merv Griffin was willing to offer. Chuck left, and Pat Sajak replaced him. Most of the Chuck Woolery episodes are hard to find, due to NBC's practice of destroying tapes from old shows. On the daytime version, ex-football star Benirschke on January 10, 1989, but he didn't work out too well. When the show moved from NBC to CBS, 6 months later, Bob Goen became the host, and was the host for two years (the show moved back to NBC in 1991 for 9 months). Pat Sajak still hosts the nighttime syndicated version.

    Susan Stafford was the original "letter turner." She was replaced by Summer Bartholemew on October 22, 1982, then Vicky McCarty three weeks later. (None of the Summer Bartholemew episodes exist due to NBC's practice of destroying tapes of old shows.) On December 13, 1982, McCarty left, and Vanna White became the new permanent hostess (BTW -- Vanna's first letter turned was a "T," in the puzzle "General Hospital"). As most game show fans know, this is not Vanna's first appearance on a game show. In June 1980, 2 1/2 years before her first appearance on Wheel of Fortune, America's favorite hostess was a contestant on The Price is Right in 1980, but she never left contestant's row (BTW – as a recurring joke, TPiR former icon/host Bob Barker always wondered aloud whatever became of her).

    Originally, Vanna rarely spoke on-camera (though she occasionally engaged in small talk with Pat at the end of the show); back then, Sajak would be introduced and then he would introduce Vanna, who always showed off a different dress or outfit (and for the record, no, she did NOT get to keep her clothes, which always come from the most glamorous of shops). However, as Vanna gained acclaim with the viewing audience, she talked more and more. Today, both Pat and Vanna walk out together and they always conversate after each program. Vanna often does the car prize descriptions prior to each bonus round.

    Charlie O'Donnell as the original announcer when Wheel of Fortune began. He left in 1982, and Jack Clark (who had earlier announced on occasion) took over full-time. Clark died of cancer in 1988 (Sajak offered a tribute to the long-time announcer in the 1988-1989 syndicated season premiere), and after a five-month stint by M.G. Kelly, O'Donnell returned, his trademark phrasing "WH-EEEEEEE-L OF FORTUNE" and "25 THOOOOOOOOOUSAND DOLLARS" intact.

    Retrospectives and going on the road Several tributes to the series have been shown through the years, most commonly as part of daytime talk shows and occasional bloopers specials. During its syndicated run, Wheel of Fortune has aired two retrospectives of its own - the first in November 1998, to mark its 3,000th show; and again in November 2003, when its 4,000th show aired, as part of a series of shows taped in New York.

    Speaking of which, Wheel of Fortune has gone "on the road" all over the country to tape shows. Among the first aired in November 1988, when the show taped from New York's Radio City Music Hall (legendary NBC announcer Don Pardo did voiceovers). Other cities have included (but are not limited to) Chicago, Nashville, Phoenix and Honolulu; and many of those episodes were part of special theme weeks (such as Best Friends Week) or have paired contestants with celebrities from a particular genre (e.g., NFL football players, country music stars).

    From Hangman to Wheel and everything in between The idea for the game show that eventually became Wheel of Fortune grew from a game known as Shopper's Bazaar. Two such pilots were produced – one in 1973 with Woolery as host, the other (from 1974) helmed by Edd Byrnes (best known as "Kookie" from the 1958-1964 detective drama, 77 Sunset Strip). The rules for the earlier pilot, hosted by Woolery, was quite different from the game we all came to know and love (e.g., a self-spinning wheel and the host pressing a button at the contestant's direction; prize money carried over to subsequent rounds and always "at risk;" etc.).

    The later pilot, hosted by Byrnes and a more talkative Stafford, was similar to what viewers first saw in 1975. When Merv Griffin Enterprises made their final plans to enter production in late 1974, a host had yet to be chosen. The story goes that Griffin's decision was made when he saw the producer's first choice, Byrnes, in the hallways prior to the taping of the first shows, repeating "A-E-I-O-U, A-E-I-O-U;" in an attempt to recall the vowels.

    It's the 60-minute Wh-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-l of Fortune In December 1975, a month after The Price is Right became a one-hour show, NBC experimented with an hour-long version of Wheel of Fortune.

    The game played thusly: Two sets of three contestants compete in three-round games each, as usual, with the returning champion playing in the second set of games. The top money winners of each three-round match met in a one-puzzle showdown for the right to advance to the bonus round (described above).

    The hour-long Wheel of Fortune lasted but a month, and returned to the 30-minute game we all came to love by the end of January 1976. BTW, several other NBC game show hits, including The Hollywood Squares, also briefly expanded to 60 minutes as part of the networks' promotion.

    Syndication Wheel of Fortune's phenomenal run in syndication almost never happened. As early as the fall of 1975, there was interest in producing a weekly nighttime show, but few syndicators were wanting to try and even fewer stations willing to buy, particularly because there were other powerhouse game shows airing (either Match Game PM or Family Feud, depending on the year) that were seen as insurmountable in the ratings.

    In 1983, King World Productions – a small-time distributor that had edited Our Gang shorts for television airing – took a chance on the show ... and it paid off royally! Airing on just 59 stations when the premiere aired Sept. 19, 1983, Wheel of Fortune (often pitted against latter-day Dawson's Family Feud) quickly soared in the ratings and within two years, was airing on nearly 200 stations and began its (thus far) permanent reign as the nation's top syndicated program. Jeopardy! rates second, with Friends reruns currently the shows' closest competitor.

    Wheel across the world (and (yuck) a kid's version, too) As Wheel of Fortune grew in popularity during the mid-1980s, countries all over the world began staging their own versions; each had their own "Pat and Vanna," and minor rules changes. Clips of these international versions are seen from time to time on the U.S. version.

    Also, a children's version of the program under the name Wheel 2000 also aired on CBS during the 1997-1998 season (with many modifications, see page for details).

    Merchandising Merchandise ... thy name is Wheel of Fortune. Even in the mid-1970s, there were two editions of the home game issued by Milton Bradley (complete with wheel, puzzle board and prize cards).

    But that was just the beginning, as by the mid-1980s, there were T-shirts, key chains, calendars and even an album of prize cue music featured on the show. Vanna merchandise also appeared, including her biography "Vanna Speaks."

    Home video games - from electronic hand-held units to cartridges and CD-ROMs for units that connect to TV - have also been highly popular (and have seen, in addition to subsequent editions with more puzzles and categories, special editions for children and sports fans).

    And through it all, one thing has not changed -- a vowel still costs you $250 (except during the Bob Goen network era/1989-91 CBS and 1991 NBC, when those A's, E's, I's, O's and U's cost just $100).moreless
  • 187
    Judge Judy

    Judge Judy

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    The people are real. The cases are real. The rulings are final. This is Judge Judy. Judge Judith Sheindlin tackles real-life small claims in her courtroom with her no nonsense attitude. Having made a name for herself as a tough but fair judge in New York's Family Court, Judge Judith Sheindlin retired from the bench in 1996 and segued to television to host this syndicated series. Judge Judith Sheindlin brings her trademark wit and wisdom to the widely successful half-hour series that takes viewers inside a television courtroom where justice is dispensed at lightning speed.moreless
  • 188
    The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson

    The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson

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    CBS
    On January 3, 2005, Craig Ferguson became the newest face in late night television. That's when he took over The Late Late Show. Ferguson was selected from a number of guest hosts after previous host Craig Kilborn stepped down in August 2004. Many people might recognize Craig as "Nigel Wick", Drew Carey's boss from The Drew Carey Show. The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson follows the traditional "late night talk show formula", which includes the host coming out from backstage and talking to the audience for a few minutes, then sits down at his desk, interviews a couple guests, and brings on an occasional stand-up comedian or musical talent to perform. The Late Late Show airs Monday-Friday at 12:35 am on CBS, following The Late Show with David Letterman. Theme Song: It's Hard to Stay Up It's Been a Long, Long Day and You Got the Sandman at the Door But Hang On, Leave the TV On and Let's Do It Anyway It's OK, You Can Always Sleep Through Work Tomorrow, OK? Hey Hey Tomorrow's Just a Future Yesterday Performed by Craig Fergusonmoreless
  • 189
    Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman

    Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman

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    CBS (ended 1998)
    Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman was a show that focused on Dr. Mike, a woman doctor in a time when that was unheard of. It started with her journey to Colorado Springs to be the town's physician after her father's death in 1868. The show focused around the town that she loved, treated and it also focused on the three children, Matthew (Chad Allen), Colleen (Erika Flores, later Jessica Bowman) and Brian Cooper (Shawn Toovey), whom she had to raise after their mother died from a rattle snake bite. In the later years, the show focused on Dr. Mike and Sully (Joe Lando) who got married and had a daughter towards the end of the shows successful run. There have been two movies made for television, and fans are gathering together in an effort that a third Dr. Quinn movie be produced.moreless
  • 190
    Pawn Stars

    Pawn Stars

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    The History Channel
    This show takes place at the Gold & Silver Pawn Shop just outside of Las Vegas, where Richard, Rick and Corey Harrison assess the values of all kinds of items and decide what its worth and find the story behind it.moreless
  • 191
    Jimmy Kimmel Live

    Jimmy Kimmel Live

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    ABC
    Emmy-winner Jimmy Kimmel serves as host and executive producer of "Jimmy Kimmel Live," ABC Television Network's distinctive late-night talk show. The show features a diverse line up of guests, including celebrities, athletes, comedians and human interest subjects. Along with a light-hearted and recognizable cast of characters, a hip house band and comedy bits in Kimmel's inimitable style, the show additionally offers one of the funniest, freshest monologues on television today. "Jimmy Kimmel Live" often features elaborate, innovative stunts - such as having Quentin Tarantino guest-direct an entire episode, or building a state of the art performance stage in the center of Hollywood Boulevard. The show originates from Disney's El Capitan Entertainment Center, located on Hollywood Boulevard in the heart of Hollywood's Walk of Fame. This famed location is featured prominently in the show as Kimmel showcases the unique character of Hollywood. "Jimmy Kimmel Live" airs weeknights at 12:05 a.m. in most markets. Midway through its third year, "Jimmy Kimmel Live" has featured such high profile guests as George Clooney, Britney Spears, Jennifer Garner, Ashton Kutcher, Ben Stiller, Jack Black, Shaquille O'Neal, Clay Aiken, Ryan Seacrest, Jose Canseco, Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne, Lindsay Lohan, Bobby Brown and Hilary Duff -- plus musical guests Coldplay, 50 Cent, Foo Fighters, Blink 182, Jane's Addiction, Toby Keith, Audioslave, Nelly, Motley Crue, No Doubt, Green Day, Barry Manilow, Lionel Richie and Alanis Morissette -- since its premiere on Super Bowl Sunday, January 26, 2003. "Jimmy Kimmel Live" is taped later in the day than other late night shows - at 7:45 p.m. PT. This allows the show to respond to the news of the day more quickly than the competition. Kimmel applies his irreverent wit to politics, television, the media, the FCC, popular culture - everything is a target. A weekly comedy segment, "Unneccesary Censorship," pokes fun at the FCC's crackdown on the media by unnecessarily censoring clips from TV news, political speeches, reality TV and nature shows. Other regular comedy segments include Cousin Sal's hidden camera pranks, Guillermo's Hollywood Gossip Round-up and adorably clueless Uncle Frank's coverage of red-carpet premieres.moreless
  • 192
    Parental Control

    Parental Control

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    MTV - Music Television
    Parental Control is a dating show with a twist. Mom and Dad get to pick candidates to date their kid in order to replace their kid's current unacceptable love interest. The show begins with mom and dad both picking a candidate of their choice. Both get to plan and carry out a date with their pride and joy and then the kid gets to choose...go with mom's pick, dad's pick or stay with their current beau.moreless
  • 193
    Angel

    Angel

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    The WB (ended 2004)
    "If you need help, then look no further. Angel Investigations is the best. Our rats are low..." "Rates!" "It says 'rats.' Our rates are low, but our standards are high. When the chips are down, and you're at the end of your rope you need someone that you can count on. And that's what you'll find here -- someone who will go all the way, no matter what. So don't lose hope. Come on over to our offices and you'll see that there's still heroes in this world." For over two centuries, Angelus was one of the most vicious vampires ever to walk the earth. Then he killed the wrong girl, and her grieving Gypsy family cursed him with the return of his soul, causing him to suffer remorse for all the hundreds of innocents that he had killed through the years. Now he goes by the name Angel, and he fights to protect the helpless from those who would prey upon them as he once did himself. After three years of living in Sunnydale, fighting alongside his girlfriend Buffy, Angel has moved to Los Angeles to continue the good fight. Aided by a few old friends and some new ones, Angel must take on vampires, demons, lawyers, and all of the other dark forces that Los Angeles has to offer.moreless
  • 194
    Monk

    Monk

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    USA (ended 2009)
    Former police detective Adrian Monk (Tony Shalhoub), whose photographic memory and amazing ability to piece together tiny clues made him a local legend, has suffered from intensified obsessive-compulsive disorder and a variety of phobias since the unsolved murder of his wife, Trudy, in 1997. Now on psychiatric leave from the San Francisco Police Department and working as a freelance detective/consultant on difficult cases, Monk hopes to convince his former boss, Captain Leland Stottlemeyer (Ted Levine), to allow him to return to the force. Stottlemeyer, who wavered between admiration for Monk and annoyance at his eccentricities during the first season, becomes more of a friend to Monk as the series develops, frequently calling him in to help, as much for Monk's benefit as for his own. However, he knows Monk's limitations as well as his strengths and still harbor doubts about the wisdom of allowing Monk to carry a gun or subdue a perpetrator. Stottlemeyer's second-in-command, Lieutenant Randall Disher (Jason Gray-Stanford), also develops both admiration and compassion for the man he once labeled "the defective detective." Despite flaws and inadequacies all around, the three become an increasingly effective team, with additional help from Monk's personal assistant. From the double-episode pilot through the first half of season three, Monk was aided by his nurse, Sharona Fleming (Bitty Schram). But in the tenth episode of the third season, Sharona was replaced by a new assistant, Natalie Teeger (Traylor Howard). Like Sharona, a divorcee with a son named Benjy, Natalie is a single parent, a widow with a daughter named Julie (Emmy Clarke). Unlike Sharona, Natalie is not a nurse but a former bartender with a fresh perspective on "Mr. Monk," as she still addresses her new boss.moreless
  • 195
    Avatar: The Last Airbender

    Avatar: The Last Airbender

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    Nickelodeon (ended 2008)
    In a lost age, the world is divided into four nations: the Water Tribes, the Earth Kingdom, the Fire Nation, and the Air Nomads. Within each nation, there is a remarkable order of men and women called the "benders" who can learn to harness their inborn talent and manipulate their native element. Bending is a powerful form combining martial art and elemental magic. In each generation, only one bender is solely capable of controlling all four elements. That bender is the Avatar. The Avatar is the spirit of the world manifested in human form. When the Avatar dies, it reincarnates into the next nation in the cycle. Starting with the mastery of his or her native element, the Avatar learns to bend all four elements. Throughout the ages, the countless incarnations of the Avatar have served to keep the four nations in harmony. Then, the Fire Nation launched a war against the other three nations. Just as the world needed the Avatar the most, he mysteriously vanished. A hundred years later, the Fire Nation is near final victory in its ruthless war of world domination. The Air Nomads were destroyed, the Air Temples ravished, and all airbender monks eradicated. The Water Tribes were raided and driven to the brink of extinction. The Earth Kingdom remains and fights a hopeless war against the Fire Nation. Many believe the Avatar was never reborn into the Air Nomads and the cycle is broken. In the desolated South Pole, a lone Water tribe struggles to survive. It is here that the village's last remaining waterbender Katara and her warrior brother Sokka rescue a strange 12-year-old boy named Aang who has been suspended in hibernation in an iceberg. The Water tribe soon discovers that Aang is not only an Airbender--the extinct race no one has seen in a century--but also the long lost Avatar. Now Katara and Sokka must safeguard the child Avatar in his journey to master all four elements and save the world from the Fire Nation. Season 1 is titled "Book One: Water", and Season 2 is titled "Book Two: Earth." Each of these seasons contains twenty "chapters." Season 3 is titled "Book Three: Fire", and contains 21 "chapters." Also Known As...: UK: Avatar: The Legend of Aang Latin America: Avatar: La Leyenda de Aang (The Legend of Aang) Brazil: Avatar: A Lenda de Aang (The Legend of Aang) Italy: Avatar: La Leggenda di Aang (The Legend of Aang) Germany: Avatar: Der Herr Der Elemente (The Master of the Elements) Spain:Avatar: La leyenda de Aang (The Legend of Aang) Holland: Avatar: De legende van Aang (The Legend of Aang) Opening Themes: The Pilot: Water. Earth. Fire. Air. My grandmother used to tell me stories about the old days. The time of peace. When the Avatar kept balance between Water Tribes, Earth Kingdom, Fire Nation, and Air Nomads. But that all changed when the Fire Nation attacked. Only the Avatar masters all four elements. Only he can stop the ruthless firebenders. But when the world needed him most, He vanished. One hundred years have passed, and Fire Nation is nearing victory in the war. Two years ago, my father and the men of my tribe journeyed to the Earth Kingdom to help fight against the Fire Nation, leaving me and my brother to look after our tribe. Some people believe that the Avatar was never reborn into Air Nomads, and that the circle is broken. But I haven't lost hope. I still believe that, somehow, The Avatar will return to save the world. Chapters 3+ Water. Earth. Fire. Air. Long ago, the four nations lived together in harmony, But everything changed when the fire nation attacked. Only the Avatar, the master of all four elements, could stop them. But when the world needed him most, he vanished. One hundred years passed and my brother and I discovered the new Avatar, an airbender named Aang. Although his airbending skills are great, He has a lot to learn before he's ready to save anyone. But I believe, Aang can save the world. The show retains the same opening theme through the second and third season. All three opening themes are voiced by Mae Whitman as Katara.moreless
  • 196
    Three's Company

    Three's Company

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    ABC (ended 1984)
    After two unsuccessful pilots, Three's Company was finally picked up by ABC in January 1977 for a first season of six episodes. After the show began to air in March, ratings were high and it became one of the highest-rated midseason show of its time. The show had a simple premise - Jack Tripper (John Ritter, a student at a local cooking college, wanted to move in with two girls, Janet Wood (Joyce DeWitt) and Chrissy Snow (Suzanne Somers). The only problem - the building's landlord, Mr. Stanley Roper (Norman Fell), who lives in the apartment below with his wife, Mrs. Helen Roper (Audra Lindley). In order for him to stay, he would have to pretend to be gay The series quickly gained a pop culture status, while maintaining the high ratings, being one of the top rated shows during its third and fourth seasons. The end of the third season saw the exit of Mr. and Mrs. Roper, who moved to a new townhouse community for The Ropers, the show's first spinoff. In came a new, and much different landlord, Mr. Furley (Don Knotts).

    During the hiatus before the fifth season, Suzanne Somers asked for a raise from $30,000 to $125,000 per episode. The producers refused, and Suzanne began to lie so she could be absent from work. Because ratings began to decline with lovable Chrissy's absence, the producers created a new character, Cindy Snow (Jennilee Harrison), who played Chrissy's cousin for the remainder of the season. At the same time, Suzanne Somers would tape short tag scenes for the end of the episode the day before the taping. She was fired by the end of the year.

    Starting off fresh during the sixth season, the producers decided to have Cindy go off to UCLA to study to become a veterinarian. So, Jack and Janet needed a new roommate. Along came Terri Alden (Priscilla Barnes), the smarter and beautiful blond who was a nurse at the local hospital. She would remain on the show for the next (and final) three years.

    Ratings began to fall during the eighth season (as they normally do), and the producers had made the decision to end the show, and create a spinoff, Three's A Crowd.

    Theme Song: Come and knock on our door ...
    We've been waiting for you ...
    Where the kisses are hers and hers and his,
    Three's company, too. Come and dance on on our floor...
    Take a step that is new ...
    We've a lovable space that needs your face,
    Three's company, too. You'll see that life is a ball again, laughter is calling for you ...
    Down at our rendez-vous,
    Three's company, too!
    moreless
  • 197
    Love It or List It

    Love It or List It

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    W Network
    Renovate or real estate? Realtor David Visentin and designer Hilary Farr compete for the homeowners' final decision to stay or go. David's insider perspective on the real estate market helps target listings to prospective buyers, but Hilary is determined to show homeowners that, within their budget, she can transform their worn-out house into a house they can love. If the owners decide to list it, Hilary's hard work adds to the home's resale value.moreless
  • 198
    Friday Night Lights

    Friday Night Lights

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    The 101 (ended 2011)
    In the small town of Dillon, Texas, football is everything. The team to beat is the Panthers, who are coached by newbie Eric Taylor. Coming back after winning the State Championship, the Panthers will need all the help they can get once the next football season arrives, amidst all the personal dramas and injuries. This series is based on the book and movie Friday Night Lights. Season two of Friday Night Lights was cut from twenty two to just fifteen completed episodes because of the 2007–2008 Writers Guild of America strike. In order to save the show and produce a new season, DirecTV stepped up and will air new episodes of season three on DirecTV's "The 101" during the fall, and then they will premiere during the winter on NBC. Both seasons can be found on DVD, as well as repeats on Bravo.moreless
  • 199
    Winx Club

    Winx Club

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    Nickelodeon
    This show was originally created in Italy. In the dimension of Magix, Bloom is believed to be the Last Fairy of Earth. One day she discoveries her powers after seeing a mystical fight she shouldn't have been able to witness. Stella helps enrol her into Alfea College for Fairies, where they meet 4 other fairies, and a couple boys from Redfountain- a school for Heroics - they battle evil from the Senior Witches, the Evil Warlock Darkar and the Vicious Sorcerer Baltor. All because Bloom is the last living member of the Royal family of Sparks, and now posses the Heart of the Dragon Fire, and was sent to Earth by her family to be saved.
    Season Summaries
    Season 1: Bloom, a normal red-headed Earth girl, finds out she might actuarially be a fairy when she meets Stella, a student from Alfea college for Fairies. Soon Bloom enrolls at Alfea and meets three other girls- Flora, Musa and Tecna. Together, the five form the Winx Club! Throughout the season they meet several boys from Red Fountain school of Heroics and the witches from the nearby Cloud Tower school. In particular, the Trix (Icy, Darcy and Stormy) are out to steal Bloom's mysterious power from her and takeover the universe. Meanwhile, Bloom is trying to find out more about her mysterious past and powers.

    Season 2: With the Witches vanquished, the Winx Club are looking forward to a normal second year at Alfea! instead they meet a new girl, Layla from Tides! Layla becomes the sixth member of the Winx Club. Plus, there's a new Redfountain boy- Helia who is an artist and a dreamer. Soon the Winx find out there is a new evil power growing- Darkar, the evil lord of the the under realm. He frees the Witches from their prison and they proceed to capture all four pieces of the Codex. Legend has it that when the Codex pieces are all reunited, with the power of the Dragonfire that they will open the doorway to the realm containing Ultimate Power.

    Season 3: The Winx must now face a new enemy- the sorcerer Baltor. He is one of the most evil villains in all the realms and was sealed in the Omega Dimension for all eternity with the hopes that he could never break free of his icy prison. The Trix free Baltor and now he is on a quest to take the magic from all of the realms and make all of their subjects his loyal slaves! He uses a vengeful schoolgirl, Chimera, to help him in his plans to takeover Stella's realm of Solaria and Princess Diaspro to takeover Eraklyion. Which realm will he take next? Season 4: The Winx club come back to Alfea after graduating and are now mega stars! They show up to teach a but after being attacked by the Black curcle they now have to travel to Earth to find the last Fairy of Earth. A race that was destroyed thousands of years ago. They have to find her before the Black circle does to bring her to their side, and not lose her to evil.

    Characters
    Bloom
    : The mysterious Earth girl who suddenly finds out that she possesses the magical power of the Dragonfire and is heir to the crown of Sparx! She has a pet bunny, Kiko, and a love interest in Brandon (Prince Sky) and her bonded pixie is Lockette, pixie of portals.

    Stella: Stella is the Princess of Solaria, and her father is King. Her mother was Queen until her parents went through a messy divorce battle. Stella draws her power from the Sun and Moon and is always a very cheerful person! She loves fashion and shopping and knows exactly how to be the perfect princess. Her bonded pixie is Amore, pixie of Love and her boyfriend is Brandon.

    Musa: Musa is from Melody, the planet of music in the Harmonic Realm. Her mother died, so she was raised by her father. Her biggest passion is music, she plays several instruments and is an excellent singer. Not that you'd ever know. Music is also where she draws her power from. She's something of a rebel and doesn't always follow the rules-however is still an A+ student. She's impulsive, bold and wild but cares deeply for her friends. Her bonded pixie is Tune, pixie of manners and her on-again-off-again boyfriend is Riven.

    Flora: Flora is the Fairy of Nature and she loves all plants and animals. She's got a big heart, but she's very shy. Flora is gentle and very sweet, it takes a lot to get her mad. But watch out, she's still powerful! Her bonded pixie is Chatta, pixie of chatter. Her boyfriend is Helia, the artist and dreamer. Though it takes them a long time to get into a relationship.

    Tecna: Just like her name suggests, Tecna is the fairy of technology and it's her source of power. She's very knowledgeable about computers and all electronics, she's also part android. She loves her little gadgets and is up to date on all the latest technology. Consequently, she's not very into fashion and modern trends, much to Stella's dismay. Her bonded pixie is Digit, pixie of technology and her kinda boyfriend is Timmy.

    Layla: Layla was the last member of the Winx club to join, she first appeared in Season 2. She is a princess from the realm of Tides and grew up very prim and proper at her parent's orders. This made her rebel in secret and she really bonded with Musa. She loves to dance, its her greatest passion. Her powers are drawn from water, she can shape water molecules into a solid form to suit her needs. Her bonded pixie is Piff. She doens't need a man to define her!

    The Redfountain Boys: At Redfountain school of heroics, boys learn to be heroes and all sorts of sword fighting techniques and the strategy behind the battles.

    Sky attends Redfountain, and for most of the first season he switched identities with his squire, Brandon. He said he wanted to find out what it would be like to be a normal guy, and then the boys were found out because of Sky's fiancee Princess Diaspro. It was an arranged marriage & Bloom gave Sky the confidence to tell his parents he didn't want one. He's a bit of a leader & loves to pilot the aircrafts.

    Brandon is Sky's best friend & Stella's Boyfriend. They start off their relationship strong & stay that way. They are the strongest couple on the show & have been in-love from the start.Brandon eventually asks Stella to marry him, & she accepts.

    Riven Attends Redfountain and he is the bad boy of the group- for most of the first two seasons. He calms down a bit after a spell on him is broken, but he is still a wild card & a bit hot headed. He dated Darcy and was (literally) under her spell until she tried to kill him. His is cocky, but it is deserved as he is secretly an A+ student. He and Musa eventually end up dating, but have their hard times off-and-on Timmy is the brainiac of the group and their major strategist. He was secretly crushing on Tecna for a while, until they both came out and admitted their feelings in season 3.

    Helia is the artist of the group. He first appeared in Season 2, and started out going to an art school before he gave up pacifism and transferred to Red Fountain. He fell for Flora very hard & fast and their personalities meshed well together.

    Nabu is Laylas boyfriend and doesn't show up untll season 3. Him & Riven originally crash after a misunderstanding, but quickly become close with each other & often are seen together. He is not a swordsman, but is very athletic & has mystical powers of his own.
    The Trix: The Trix or the Senior Witches are Icy, Darcy and Stormy, descendants of the evil Witches coven that destroyed Sparx. They are bitter about their lack of power and are always trying to get more- first by attempting to steal the Dragonfire from Bllom and then by teaming up with Darkar and later Baltor. Icy is the leader and strongest of the three and is the favorite of Darkar and Baltor. Her power takes the form of ice. Darcy's is usually hypnotism and illusions whereas Stormy's power takes the form of malicious weather like tornadoes and lightning.


    Theme song Lyrics (Season 1 and 3)

    Close your eyes And open your heart. Believe in yourself, That's how it starts!

    Dreams will come true, Just wait and see, 'Cuz the magic's in you, And the magic's in me!

    We are the Winx! We are the Winx! Come join the club! We are the Winx! We are the Winx! We are the Winx! Come join the club! We are the Winx!

    Magical flowers, Digital powers, Rhythms and tunes, The sun and the moon! Magic shapes and shifting tides And the fire burning deep inside!

    We've got the stlye! And we've got the flare, Look all you want, Just don't touch the hair!

    We are the Winx! We are the Winx! Come join the club! We are the Winx! We are the Winx! We are the Winx! Come join the club, We are the Winx!


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    Ugly Betty

    Ugly Betty

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    ABC (ended 2010)
    Betty Suarez has always had one goal in life: to make it into the publishing business. Despite being smart, hard-working, and productive, her dream has always been shadowed by the fact that she isn't as traditionally beautiful as her cover ready colleagues. But despite it all, she is determined to do whatever it takes to fulfill that ultimate dream.

    Ugly Betty stars America Ferrera in the title role. The show is based on the wildly popular Colombian telenovela which has already been successfully translated in Mexico, India, Russia, Greece and Germany - all to stellar ratings.moreless
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