We're moving Forums to the Community pages. Click here for more information and updates.

Democracy Now!

Follow
Democracy Now! Premiered Jan 02, 2004 In Season

USER EDITOR

No Editor

User Score: 0

Episode Guide

  • 2012
    • Friday, February 10, 2012
      2/10/12
      0.0
      The U.S. Justice Department has unveiled a record mortgage settlement with the nation’s five largest banks to resolve claims over faulty foreclosures and mortgage practices that have indebted and displaced homeowners and sunk the nation’s economy. While the deal is being described as a $25 billion settlement, the banks will only have to pay out a total of $5 billion in cash between them. We speak to one of the settlement’s most prominent critics, Yves Smith, a longtime financial analyst who runs the popular finance website, "Naked Capitalism." "The settlement, on the surface, does look like it’s helping homeowners," Smith says. "But, in fact, the bigger part that most people don’t recognize is the way it actually helps the banks with mortgages on their own books... The real problem is that this deal is just not going to give that much relief." [includes rush transcript]moreless
    • Thursday, February 9, 2012
      2/9/12
      0.0
      The first democratically elected president of the tiny Indian Ocean state of Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, has been ousted in what he has described as a coup d’état at gunpoint. A longtime pro-democracy activist who was jailed for six years, Nasheed has achieved international prominence as a leading campaigner to save island nations from global warming. Earlier today, Nasheed said an arrest warrant has been issued for him following two days of street protests against the coup. We speak with Paul Roberts, who served as Nasheed’s communications adviser and was with him on the day of the coup. Roberts says he fears a warrant has been issued for his own arrest and speaks to us from an undisclosed location. [includes rush transcript–partial]moreless
    • Wednesday, February 8, 2012
      2/8/12
      0.0
      Former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum has surged in the Republican presidential contest with wins in the Minnesota and Colorado caucuses, as well as a nonbinding primary in Missouri. Santorum’s win appears to have been fueled by evangelical voters, emboldening his claim to be the "true conservative" in the Republican race. The contests in Minnesota, Colorado and Missouri notably differed from earlier states in the absence of a flood of spending backing front-runner Mitt Romney. We get reaction to Santorum’s victories from Michael Brendan Dougherty of Business Insider and the American Conservative and Jon O’Brien of Catholics for Choice. [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Tuesday, February 7, 2012
      2/7/12
      0.0
      Syria is seeing some of the worst violence of the 11-month uprising against Bashar al-Assad amid an ongoing international standoff over how to respond. Assad’s forces have launched what appears to be one of their fiercest assaults on the flashpoint city of Homs to date. Both the United States and Britain have closed their embassies in the Syrian capital of Damascus and withdrawn diplomatic personnel, citing safety fears. As the crisis escalates, Russia and China are facing criticism for blocking a U.N. Security Council resolution backed by the United States and Arab League calling for a political transition in Syria. To discuss the situation in Syria, we’re joined by Patrick Seale, a leading British writer on the Middle East and author of "Asad: The Struggle for the Middle East." "It’s at least a two- or possibly a three-stage crisis. Internally in Syria, the situation is getting worse by the day," Seale says. "At a higher level, there is a struggle between the United States, on the one hand, and its allies, and its opponents like Russia and China... Then there’s a third level, possibly, of Arab Gulf states like Qatar, for example, even Saudi Arabia behind it, who are obsessed and worried by Iran, and they think that Iran might stir up Shia communities in the region." [includes rush transcript–partial]moreless
    • Monday, February 6, 2012
      2/6/12
      0.0
      The CIA’s drone campaign targeting suspected militants in Pakistan has killed dozens of civilians who had gone to rescue victims or were attending funerals. So concludes a new report by the London-based Bureau of Investigative Journalism. It found that since President Obama took office three years ago, as many as 535 civilians have killed, including more than 60 children. The investigation also revealed that at least 50 civilians were killed in follow-up strikes when they had gone to help victims. More than 20 civilians have also been attacked in deliberate strikes on funerals and mourners. We speak to Chris Woods, award-winning reporter with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism. "We noted that there were repeated reports at the time, contemporaneous reports in publications like New York Times, news agencies like Reuters, like CNN, that there were these strikes on rescuers, that there were reports of an initial strike and then some minutes later, as people had come forward to pull out the dead and injured that drones had returned to the scene and attacked rescues,” Woods says, “We have been able to name just over 50 civilians that we understand have been killed in those attacks. In total, we think that more than 75 civilians have been killed specifically in these attacks on rescuers and on mourners, on funeral-goers."moreless
    • Friday, February 3, 2012
      2/3/12
      0.0
      New revelations have emerged about the New York City Police Department’s secret program to spy on Muslim communities. The Associated Press has just uncovered a confidential NYPD plan from 2006 to engage in targeted surveillance of Shiite mosques following increased tensions between the U.S. and Iran; the latest revelation on its secret intelligence operations focused on Muslim neighborhoods. On Thursday a coalition of Muslim and civil rights organizations reiterated their call for the immediate resignation of NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly. We’re joined by reporter Matt Apuzzo, who has helped break the NYPD spying story for the Associated Press; and Imam Talib Abdur-Rashid, spiritual leader at the Mosque of Islamic Brotherhood and president of the Islamic Leadership Council of New York. [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Thursday, February 2, 2012
      2/2/12
      0.0
      The Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Josh Fox was handcuffed and arrested Wednesday as he attempted to film a congressional hearing on the controversial natural gas drilling technique known as fracking, which the Environmental Protection Agency recently reported caused water contamination in Pavillion, Wyoming. Fox directed the award-winning film, "Gasland," which documents the impact of fracking on communities across the United States, and is now working on a sequel. Fox says he was arrested after Republicans refused to allow him to film because he did not have the proper credentials. "We wanted to report on what happened [at the hearing]. I was not interested in disrupting that hearing. It was not a protest action," says Fox. "I was simply trying to do my job as a journalist and go in there and show to the American people what was transpiring in that hearing, so that down the line, as we know there will be a lot of challenges mounted to that [Pavillion, Wyoming] EPA report—and frankly, to the people in Pavillion, who have been sticking up for themselves and demanding an investigation into the groundwater contamination—and to make sure that people could view that in a larger forum than usually happens." [includes rush transcript]moreless
    • Wednesday, February 1, 2012
      2/1/12
      0.0
      Mitt Romney beat Newt Gingrich by 14 percent last night in the Florida primary, but he has yet to win a majority of votes in in any state contest so far and Gingrich has vowed to continue his fight. The Florida vote was the first contest of the year where only registered Republicans could participate, with independents and crossover Democrats restricted from casting ballots in the primary. “The Florida primary is a very big one for Mitt Romney,” says David Bernstein, political writer for the Boston Phoenix who has covered Romney for years. “They knew he was not likely to win a lot of states in the south, some of the conservative Midwest, so Florida was really the one place where they thought they had to win, and with Florida, they feel like the rest of the states really add up in their favor from this point.” [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Tuesday, January 31, 2012
      1/31/12
      0.0
      As homeowners across the nation struggle to keep up with mortgage payments—and in the worse cases face foreclosure—a new investigation reveals that taxpayer-owned mortgage giant, Freddie Mac, made multi-billion-dollar investments that profited if borrowers stayed stuck in high-interest mortgages. Freddie Mac began increasing these investments dramatically in late 2010, at the same time it was making it harder for homeowners to get out of such mortgages. Several U.S. lawmakers and prominent economists are now calling for Congress and the White House to end this financial conflict of interest. This comes just one week after President Obama promised "no more red tape" for homeowners looking to refinance. We speak with Jesse Eisinger, a Pulitzer Prize-winning senior reporter at ProPublica, who co-authored the investigative report with NPR news. [includes rush transcript]moreless
    • Monday, January 30, 2012
      1/30/12
      0.0
      On the heels of a new military survey that the number of reported violent sex crimes jumped 30 percent 2011, with active-duty female soldiers ages 18 to 21 accounting for more than half of the of the victims, we speak with Trina McDonald and Kori Cioca, two subjects of “The Invisible War,” a new documentary that examines the epidemic of rape of soldiers within the U.S. military, which won the Audience Award at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. “Not only was I astounded by the numbers, but when I started talking to the women and men who had experienced this, I was just so devastated by their stories,” says the film’s Academy Award-nominated director, Kirby Dick. “These are women and men who are very idealistic, they joined the military because they wanted to serve their country, they were incredible soldiers and then, when they were assaulted, they had the courage to come forward — even though many people advised them not to,” Dick says. [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Friday, January 27, 2012
      1/27/12
      0.0
      New York Daily News columnist and Democracy Now! co-host Juan Gonzalez reports the Treasury Department has approved payouts exceeding $5 million for 49 executives at firms that most benefited from the Wall Street bailout. The executives’ pay came despite the $500,000 salary cap established under the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Thursday, January 26, 2012
      1/26/12
      0.0
      The last of the U.S. marines charged in the 2005 Haditha massacre of 24 Iraqi civilians, Staff Sergeant Frank Wuterich, received no jail time after he pleaded guilty to dereliction of duty and avoiding charges of involuntary manslaughter. Under his sentencing, Wuterich now faces a maximum penalty of a demotion to the rank of private. The victims, including women and children, were killed when the marines burst into their homes and shot them dead in their nightclothes. Wuterich allegedly led the Haditha massacre and was the last defendant to face charges. Six other marines have had their charges dropped or dismissed, while another soldier was acquitted. "[Iraqi] outrage is perfectly understandable," says Tim McGirk, the Time magazine reporter who broke the story on the Haditha massacre. "Here is a case where so many Iraqis were killed, women and children, old men, and yet what’s happened? Most of the charges have been dismissed, and Wuterich was basically given a slap on the wrist." [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Wednesday, January 25, 2012
      1/25/12
      0.0
      In his last State of the Union speech before the November election, President Obama defended his record addressing the financial crisis and called for greater economic fairness. He warned that Wall Street would no longer be allowed to play by its own set of rules. But the bulk of the speech dealt with the economy. We get reaction from Jared Bernstein, former Chief Economist and Economic Adviser to Vice President Joe Biden and past member of President Obama’s economic team. Bernstein says that Occupy Wall Street "had a lot to do with" Obama’s message of economic fairness: "These issues are called populist now — frankly I think they are just basic fairness. I don’t know why it’s populist to argue that middle-class people should pay a fairer tax rate, one that is certainly no higher than that paid by millionaires and billionaires, or, for that matter, that economic growth should not be a spectator sport for people in the middle class. [These ideas] haven’t broken through in the way that Occupy Wall Street did in a matter of months. So, I give them a ton of credit." [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Tuesday, January 24, 2012
      1/24/12
      0.0
      During the GOP primary, Mitt Romney has come under fierce attack for parking millions of dollars of his personal wealth in investment funds set up in the Cayman Islands, a notorious Caribbean tax haven. We speak with Tax Justice Network USA Chair Jack Blum, a former top Congressional investigator of financial crimes, who says tax evasion could seriously cripple the already struggling economy. Blum appears in "We’re Not Broke," a documentary that premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. The film examines widespread corporate tax evasion in the United States and the increasing role of offshore tax havens. "Has [Romney] cheated? No," Blum says. "But what he has done is take full advantage of the system that has been structured the way it is because of political influence and tremendous amount of lobbying money on Capitol Hill. … We must not only rewrite the internal revenue code, but we must get a fair contribution from the very wealthy and from corporations — that is the only way to balance the budget." [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Monday, January 23, 2012
      1/23/12
      0.0
      As the Republican presidential candidates propose to dismantle President Obama’s 2010 healthcare reform package, we speak to Dr. Steven Nissen, one of the nation’s leading cardiologists. His research into Vioxx and Avandia led to severe restrictions by the Food and Drug Administration, reducing the use of both drugs. Nissen is profiled in the documentary, “Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Health Care,” which is being featured this year at the Sundance Film Festival. The film tackles the powerful forces behind the battle over heathcare costs and access. "Healthcare has become such a huge business that the forces that don’t want change — the insurance industry, the hospital industry, even physician professional societies have so aligned to keep the system as it is, that it’s very hard to overcome that,” said Dr. Nissen, who chairs the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. “My fear in this election, because of the Citizens United ruling, is massive amounts of money from people with a huge stake in making a profit from healthcare are going to influence the electorate with just an amazing amount of money."moreless
    • Friday, January 20, 2012
      1/20/12
      0.0
      Republican presidential candidates gathered in Charleston, South Carolina, Thursday night for their final debate before Saturday’s primary. The debate capped a busy day that saw the departure of Texas Gov. Rick Perry, Rick Santorum’s defeat of Mitt Romney in the Iowa caucus recount, and new details of Newt Gingrich’s infidelities during his second marriage. We air clips from the debate and speak to Kevin Alexander Gray, a civil rights activist and community organizer in South Carolina, and Wayne Slater, a senior political writer at the Dallas Morning News and author of "Bush’s Brain: How Karl Rove Made George W. Bush Presidential." [includes rush transcript]moreless
    • Thursday, January 19, 2012
      1/19/12
      0.0
      Congressional support for a pair of anti-piracy bills is weakening after Wednesday’s historic online protest in which thousands of websites went dark for 24 hours. Hollywood film studios, music publishers and major broadcasters support the anti-piracy legislation, saying it aims to stop the piracy of copyrighted material over the internet on websites based outside the United States. "We’re talking about sites that are operated and dedicated to piracy and that are really preventing individual creators across the country from having an economic livelihood from their creative pursuits," says Sandra Aistars, Executive Director of the Copyright Alliance, whose members include the Motion Picture Association of America, NBC Universal, Time Warner, Viacom, ASCAP and BMI. But critics say the bills could profoundly change the internet by stifling innovation and investment, hallmarks of the free, open internet. "Wikipedia can be defined as a search engine under these [bills]," says Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Sales. "That would mean it would be illegal for Wikipedia to link to a site, even if we are explaining to the public what is going on here. That would become illegal. This is outrageous. It’s not acceptable under the First Amendment." [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Tuesday, January 17, 2012
      1/17/12
      0.0
      Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia and sixth most visited site in the world, will join websites like the content aggregator Reddit, to "go dark" on Wednesday in opposition to the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), and its companion bill, the Protect IP Act (PIPA), which are currently being debated in Congress. “What these bills propose are new powers for the government — and also for private actors — to create effectively blacklists of sites that allegedly are engaging in some form of online infringement and then force service providers to block access to those sites,” says Corynne McSherry, Intellectual Property Director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. “What we would have is a situation where the government and private actors could censor the net.” Chief technology officials in the Obama administration have expressed concern about any “legislation that ... undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet." But the bill’s main backers, Hollywood movie studios and music publishers, want to stop the theft of their creative content and the bills have widespread bipartisan support. A vote on SOPA is on hold in the House now, as the Senate is still scheduled vote on PIPA next Tuesday. [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Monday, January 16, 2012
      1/16/12
      0.0
      Today is the federal holiday that honors Dr. Martin Luther King. He was born January 15th, 1929. He was assassinated April 4, 1968, at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. He was just 39 years old. While Dr. King is primarily remembered as a civil rights leader, he also championed the cause of the poor and organized the Poor People’s Campaign to address issues of economic justice. Dr. King was also a fierce critic of U.S. foreign policy and the Vietnam War. We play his “Beyond Vietnam” speech, which he delivered at New York’s Riverside Church on April 4, 1967, as well as his last speech, “I Have Been to the Mountain Top,” that he gave on April 3, 1968, the night before he was assassinated. [includes rush transcript]moreless
    • Friday, January 13, 2012
      1/13/12
      0.0
      On the second anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Haiti that killed roughly 300,000 people and left more than 1.5 million homeless, we speak with Randall Robinson, author of “An Unbroken Agony: Haiti, from Revolution to the Kidnapping of a President.” The United Nations estimates international donors gave Haiti over $1.6 billion in relief aid since the earthquake, and more than $2 billion in recovery aid over the last two years. But critics say little of the funding made it directly to the Haitian people, instead going to international non-governmental organizations and private companies involved in the relief effort. “I am not surprised that the reconstruction efforts are not going well,” Robinson says. “Because I don’t think the United States officially ever wanted anything to go well in Haiti.”moreless
    • Thursday, January 12, 2012
      1/12/12
      0.0
      Michael Copps served two terms with the Federal Communications Commission. Now the staunch supporter of an open internet and opponent of media consolidation has retired. In a wide ranging discussion, he examines the FCC’s key accomplishments and failures of the past decade. Copps argues broadband is “the most opportunity-creating technology perhaps in the history of humankind,” and laments that the United States still lacks a national broadband infrastructure. He says the FCC has yet to address a lack of diversity in media ownership, noting that “owning a station has a lot to do with the kind of programing that is going to be on that station.” Regarding the future of journalism, he calls on the FCC to make access to quality journalism a “national priority,” saying, “the future of our democracy hinges upon having an informed electorate.” [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Wednesday, January 11, 2012
      1/11/12
      0.0
      Mitt Romney won the New Hampshire Republican presidential primary with almost 40 percent of the vote, giving the former Massachusetts governor a sweep of the first two critical tests in the GOP nominating contest. He used his victory speech to alternatively attack his potential rival, President Obama, and outline his plans if elected, saying voters must choose "between two very different destinies." Meanwhile, Texas Rep. Ron Paul finished a strong second with 23 percent of the vote and told his supporters, "but we are nibbling at [Romney’s] heels." Despite campaigning almost exclusively in New Hampshire, former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman secured just 17 percent of the vote, but argued that "third place is a ticket to ride" and vowed to continue his campaign in New Hampshire. We play excerpts from last night’s speeches by the top three Republican contenders. [includes rush transcript]moreless
    • Monday, January 9, 2012
      1/9/12
      0.0
      During the Republican presidential debates this weekend, candidates took aim at the military strategy President Obama unveiled late last week, which vows cuts in military spending and a stepped-up focus on the Asia-Pacific region, as well as increased use of drone strikes that have targeted militants in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Yemen and throughout Horn of Africa. We speak with William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy, about Obama’s new strategy, which leaves spending at levels equal to the Bush administration, and examine alternatives presented by the GOP front-runner in New Hampshire, Mitt Romney. “His plan would be sort of laughable if it wasn’t so obscene,” Hartung says. “He’s talking about, let’s keep the military budget at 4 percent of GDP, as if it was some sort of entitlement program for the Pentagon ... He would spend something like $6.5 trillion over 10 years, which would be about a trillion and a half more than the Obama plan. ... If he’s not gonna raise taxes, it’s going to come straight out of domestic programs which are already being hit quite substantially.” [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Friday, January 6, 2012
      1/6/12
      0.0
      The family of a Dallas teenager Jakadrien Turner is demanding answers after she was deported to Colombia, despite the fact that she is a U.S. citizen and speaks no Spanish. Turner, a 15-year-old African-American runaway, was living in Houston when she was arrested for shoplifting and gave police a fake name that belonged to a 22-year-old undocumented immigrant from Colombia with warrants for her arrest. The Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE) reportedly discovered Turner’s fingerprints did not match those of the Colombian national’s, but deported her anyway. "The country has no idea that we have got a rogue police force. That rogue police force is called ICE," says Ralph Isenberg, a Dallas businessman who has become an advocate for immigrants. "I’m hoping that Black America — who have a history of understanding the destruction of our families, because of what slavery has done to our families — will at some point wake up and understand that the problem of immigrants is something we can not ignore," adds Dallas Reverend Peter Johnson, a longtime civil rights advocate who has worked with the Turner family. We also speak with Jacqueline Stevens, a political science professor at Northwestern University who recently published an exhaustive report on U.S. citizens who have been detained and deported. [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Thursday, January 5, 2012
      1/5/12
      0.0
      President Obama has defied Congress by installing former Ohio attorney general Richard Cordray as the country’s first head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, established to protect citizens against the practices of Wall Street banks and lenders. Obama’s move defied Republicans, who have refused to allow Cordray’s confirmation after failing to stop the bureau’s creation in 2010. "The reason this has been held up had nothing to do with the qualifications of Richard Cordray ... and everything to do with Republicans’ insistence on trying to destroy the agency. That insistence traces directly to the contributions and political influence of Wall Street," says Robert Weissman, president of Public Citizen, which supports Obama’s appointment. [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Wednesday, January 4, 2012
      1/4/12
      0.0
      Winning by just eight votes, Mitt Romney narrowly beat Rick Santorum for the GOP presidential nomination in the closest Iowa Republican caucus in history. Both Romney and Santorum received just more than 25 percent of the vote, while Rep. Ron Paul of Texas placed third with 21 percent. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich placed fourth followed by Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who then announced he is going back to Texas to reassess his campaign. Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, who won the Iowa straw poll in August, placed sixth with just 5 percent of the vote. After our broadcast, the Associated Press reported a Bachmann advisor says she will end her White House bid. [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Tuesday, January 3, 2012
      1/3/12
      0.0
      Iowa is awash in millions of dollars of negative campaign ads funded by so-called Super PACs as voters head to their caucuses in the first real test of the 2012 election. “If you want to see the future of politics in America, turn on the television in Iowa,” says John Nichols, correspondent for The Nation magazine. “If it is this kind of overwhelming flood of negative ads, literally flipping on a dime to take down any candidate who rises in opposition to the mainstream, or kind of core Republican contender with the most money — it’s a pretty scary picture. And it is one that suggests that if we don’t get serious about addressing Citizens United [v. Federal Election Commission], we’re going to end up with a much uglier, more destructive politics." Nichols estimates the candidates and their PACs spent “$200 per vote” in Iowa. The latest public opinion polls show Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney holding a narrow lead of 24 percent over Rep. Ron Paul and Rick Santorum. Nichols says Santorum’s comments over the weekend about not wanting to "make black people’s lives better by giving them somebody else’s money,” highlight how Republican candidates have failed to reach out to Iowa’s many minority communities. Meanwhile, the Occupy movement has tried to inject the voices of the 99 percent into the race by holding protests at events and both Republican and Democratic campaign headquarters throughout the state. [Rush transcript to come. Check back soon.]moreless
    • Monday, January 2, 2012
      1/2/12
      0.0
      Today we look back at 2011, a year that saw the U.S. killing of Osama Bin Laden, the ouster of a dictator in Egypt and the death of one in Libya, the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan, and the expansion of the secret U.S. drone war in Afghanistan, Pakistan and the Arabian Peninsula. As U.S. troops leave Iraq, thousands of private security contractors remain to guard the U.S. embassy—the largest in the world. The Horn of Africa was hit by the region’s worst drought in decades as the devastating impact of extreme weather was felt across the globe, while the world’s most powerful countries continue to refuse to join in a pact to address climate change. However, 2011 may be most remembered as a year of global uprisings. From the Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street, millions of people took to the streets to oppose repressive regimes and an unjust economic system. We spend the hour today looking back at the protest movements that shaped 2011. [includes rush transcript]moreless
  • 2011
  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2004
  • 2003
  • 2002
  • 2001
  • 2000
Thursday
No results found.
Friday
No results found.
Saturday
No results found.