Downton Abbey

Season 1 Episode 4

Episode 4

20
Aired Sunday 9:00 PM Oct 17, 2010 on ITV
9.0
out of 10
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86 votes
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Episode Summary

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Two men vy for Daisy's affections, wanting to take her to the fair, while Sybil helps Gwen in her search for a new job. Violet has a favour to ask of Matthew. Mrs. Hughes takes an evening off to spend time with an old flame.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • It's time for the village fair and the servants from Downton Abbey are very excited!

    9.5
    The village fair has arrived and the majority of the servants are particularly excited at the prospect. Young Daisy, who spends so much of her time being bullied by Mrs. Padmore is delighted when both the scoundrel Thomas and the shy young William start paying attention to her. Both young men wish to escort her to the event and she must choose.



    Mrs. Hughes has reasons of her own for wanting to attend the fair when an old boyfriend returns to the area. Even Lady Mary and Cousin Matthew enjoy the evening as they find that they are liking each other more and more, although Mary is, to say the least, very mercurial and can be moody beyond words as she examines the frustrating nature of her situation.moreless

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  • QUOTES (12)

    • Branson: Will you have your own way, do you think?(causing Sybil to look up from the back seat)With the frock? Only I couldn't help overhearing yesterday, and from what Her Ladyship said, it sounded as if you supported women's rights.
      Sybil: I suppose I do.
      Branson: Because I'm quite political. In fact, I've brought some pamphlets that I thought might interest you.(he hands her paper over the seat)
      About the vote.
      Sybil: Thank you. But please don't mention this to my father or my grandmother. One whiff of reform and she hears the rattle of the guillotine.(Branson laughs) It seems rather unlikely, a revolutionary chauffeur.
      Branson: Maybe, but I'm a Socialist, not a revolutionary. And I won't always be a chauffeur.

    • Branson: Will you have your own way, do you think?(causing Sybil to look up from the back seat)With the frock? Only I couldn't help overhearing yesterday, and from what Her Ladyship said, it sounded as if you supported women's rights.
      Sybil: I suppose I do.
      Branson: Because I'm quite political. In fact, I've brought some pamphlets that I thought might interest you.(he hands her paper over the seat)
      About the vote.
      Sybil: Thank you. But please don't mention this to my father or my grandmother. One whiff of reform and she hears the rattle of the guillotine.(Branson laughs) It seems rather unlikely, a revolutionary chauffeur.
      Branson: Maybe, but I'm a Socialist, not a revolutionary. And I won't always be a chauffeur.

    • Matthew: The question is, what do I say to Cousin Violet?
      Robert: No, don't worry about that. I can handle her.
      Violet: (as she walks in followed by Mary)Really? Well, if you can you must have learned to very recently.(Violet looks smug and Mary looks apologetic)

    • Thomas: What chance did he have? Up against a champion?(Mr. Bates pushes him up against a wall)
      Mr. Bates: Now, you listen, you filthy little rat. If you don't lay off, I will punch your shining teeth through the back of your skull.
      Thomas: Is this supposed to frighten me, Mr. Bates? Because if it is, it isn't working. I'm sorry, but it's just not working.(Mr. Bates pushes him again then Thomas walks away)

    • Branson: What are you doing?

      Mr. Bates: Sorting the collars. Removing the ones that have come to an end.

      Branson: What happens to His Lordship's old clothes?

      Miss O'Brien: What's it to you? Clothes are a valet's perk, not a chauffeur's.

      Mr. Bates: I get some, but most of it goes into the missionary barrel.

      Branson: I know it's meant to be kind, but I can think of better ways of helping the needy than sending stiff collars to the equator. (Mr. Bates laughs)

    • Cora: Heavens! Look at the time. Not a minute to change, and Granny's invited herself for dinner.
      Sybil: Then she can jolly well wait.
      Cora: So women's rights begin at home? I see. (they all laugh) Well, I'm all for that.

    • Violet: Good heavens, what am I sitting on?
      Matthew: A swivel chair.
      Violet: Oh, another modern brainwave?
      Matthew: Not very modern. They were invented by Thomas Jefferson.
      Violet: Why does every day involve a fight with an American?
      Matthew: I'll fetch a different one.
      Violet: No, no, no, no. I'm a good sailor.

    • Robert: Won't you miss Ireland?
      Branson: Ireland, yes, but not the job. The mistress was a nice lady, but she only had one car and she wouldn't let me drive it over twenty miles an hour. So it was a bit...well, boring, so to speak.(Robert laughs) You've got a wonderful library.
      Robert: (looking surprised) You're welcome to borrow books if you wish.
      Branson: Really, m'lord?
      Robert: There's a ledger over there that I make everyone use, even my daughters. Carson and Mrs. Hughes sometimes take a novel or two. What are your interests?
      Branson: History and politics mostly.
      Robert: (looking surprised again) Heavens.

    • Matthew: (Speaking with Lord Grantham as they walk.) I hope Cousin Violet has recovered from last night.
      Lord Grantham: Whatever she says, my mother is as strong as an ox and it's high time she let go of her scheme for upsetting everything. It's time we all did.
      Matthew: I can't deny I'm pleased to hear it.
      Lord Grantham: Are you beginning to see a future here, then?
      Matthew: In a way, this latest business has forced me to recognise that I do want Downton to be my future.
      Lord Grantham: I'm glad.
      Matthew: You must have thought me an awful prig when I arrived.
      Lord Grantham: Not a prig, just a man thrust into something he never wanted or envisaged.
      Matthew: I could only see the absurdity of the whole thing. I'm sorry.
      Lord Grantham: Well, there are absurdities involved, as I know well enough.
      Matthew: Possibilities, too. And I was blind to them. And I was determined not to let it change me. It was absurd. If you don't change, you die.
      Lord Grantham: Do you think so? I'm not sure. Sometimes, I think I hate change.
      Matthew: Well at least we can comfort ourselves that this will still be here. Because we saved it.

    • Lady Mary: So, are you enjoying your new life?
      Matthew: Yes, I think so. I know my work seems very trivial to you.
      Lady Mary: Not necessarily. Sometimes I rather envy you, having somewhere to go every morning.
      Matthew: I thought that made me very middle class.
      Lady Mary: You should learn to forget what I say. I know I do.
      Matthew: How about you? Is your life proving satisfactory, apart from the 'great matter' of course?
      Lady Mary: Women like me don't have a life. We choose clothes and pay calls and work for charity and do the Season. But really we're stuck in a waiting room until we marry.
      Matthew: I've made you angry.
      Lady Mary: My life makes me angry, not you.

    • Lord Grantham: (Speaking to Carson in reference to the new chauffeur, Branson.) He seems a bright spark after poor old Taylor. And to think Taylor's gone off to run a tea shop. I cannot feel it will make for a very restful retirement, can you?
      Carson: I would rather be put to death, my lord.
      Lord Grantham: Quite so. Thank you, Carson.

    • Anna: (Walking up to Lady Mary) Good day, my lady. Is her ladyship alright? Has she recovered from...?
      Lady Mary: If you think she'll ever recover from carrying the body of Mr Pamuk from one side of the house to the other, then you don't know her at all.
      Anna: Well, I didn't mean 'recover' exactly, just to get past it.
      Lady Mary: She won't do that either. When she dies, they'll cut her open and find it engraved on her heart.
      Anna: What about you? What about your heart?
      Lady Mary: Haven't you heard? I don't have a heart, everyone knows that.
      Anna: Not me, my lady.

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