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Elementary S02E21: "The Man With the Twisted Lip"

Throughout the first half of Elementary's second season, I focused a great deal on Sherlock's developing sense of empathy, as he was routinely establishing connections beyond himself and also beyond Joan. After the winter and Olympic breaks, the show didn't devote too much attention to this particular issue; the highlights were Sherlock maybe helping Lestrade get his groove back and then Bell and Sherlock making up with decidedly little fanfare, which serviced Sherlock as a character more than it did Bell. For the most part, though, the show was content to let that particular point slide away—and possibly to its detriment, considering its recent run of bad cases and lackluster character beats.

So it was nice to see "The Man With the Twisted Lip" rectify all of that with a topical and interesting case and a return to the issue of empathy, itself so well timed with Mycroft's own return to stir up trouble by declaring his intentions for Joan.

One of the things I continue to love about Elementary is the way it uses Sherlock's sobriety to force Sherlock to talk about himself. AA meetings are a natural setting for that, so when Sherlock made that small speech at the start of the episode, it didn't feel dramatically inert—or like lazy writing on the show's behalf—because of its context. More importantly, however, it demonstrated a degree of self-awareness from Sherlock with regard to his potential limitations, a key thing for an addict to understand and work through. For Sherlock to say, "I can only extend so much of myself to a non-peer, which means I can only extend so much of myself to anyone. I've made progress, of course, but I don’t know how much more growth there is within me. If I can never value a relationship properly, then, at what point do I stop trying to maintain them?" and then to identify this very issue as the primary threat to his sobriety helped to drive home the loneliness that Sherlock feels, and how much Joan has come to stabilize him.

The challenge is that Sherlock's sense of his recovery is very much like an addiction: It is inherently selfish and demanding, with a focus on one's own gratification, whether through getting high or, as in Sherlock's case, not getting high. The onus is on him to stay clean, but he relies on Joan's constant presence and lack of boundaries to keep him aware of that onus. As Alistair's death in "No Lack of Void" reminded Sherlock, it's very easy to slip, and for no knowable reason. Joan is the string around his finger reminding him not to use again, and the loosening of that string, represented by Mycroft's return to New York, is terrifying for him.

So while I disagree with Mycroft that Sherlock doesn't "care a whit about [Joan's] happiness," Sherlock does place his own security and stability ahead of her happiness. That's the key difference between Mycroft's diagnosis and Joan's spot-on rebuttal to his proclamation that he values Joan and is sorry for meddling in her life. Sherlock's needs come first. His and Joan's partnership was never an equal one given their roles of teacher and student, client and sober companion—but their friendship being not quite equal, even though it should be, provides the tension that Mycroft is able to exploit.


Of course, the ends to which Mycroft is using these divisive means remains a mystery. He's selling it all very well, though. Rhys Ifans laid on just the right amount of British-y stammering to be charming and adorable while Mycroft subtly pushed the idea that Joan wouldn't be receptive to his declaration of attraction because of Sherlock's many issues. It's a bit of reverse psychology on Mycroft's part, calling attention to Joan's occasional desire for a life outside of being Sherlock's ever-present stability anchor, including the freedom to wake up whenever she wants in the morning, even if Sherlock does occasionally bring her breakfast in bed. 

On the other side of the equation, Mycroft pushed Sherlock's buttons regarding whether Sherlock could actually do something to demonstrate to Joan that he would put her needs before his, something Sherlock clearly isn't prepared to do. It was a nice little bit of manipulation that allowed for some believable tensions between the duo, even if those tensions don't really exist on the show when Mycroft isn't around. Elementary can give Joan all the single-episode friends and single-episode guilt trips its wants, but the challenge with a character-based procedural in the standard broadcast episode model is to ensure that there's a cumulative effect for these sorts of emotional fractures. As such, Elementary is a pretty lucky that Jonny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu have such a solid chemistry, because even after a break of minimal strife between the two of them, it felt like there'd been more build-up than there probably had been.

Which brings us to the whole kidnapping of Joan thing. This was a little eye roll-inducing for me (it seems a touch melodramatic for this show), and the idea that these French mobsters may have some ties to Mycroft was the only thing that prevented me from writing it off completely. Certainly it'll be one of those instances where both Joan and Sherlock will end up reevaluating their roles in one another's lives because of a crisis, and with Joan actually gone, Sherlock will have to rely on himself—as well as Mycroft, judging from the promo for next week's episode—to keep himself together and rescue Joan (even if I'd rather see Joan rescue herself).


Right! The case with the drones! It's always so easy to get caught up in the character aspect of the character-driven procedural, and for obvious reasons. After a smattering of lousy cases, this week's had enough razzle dazzle—mosquito-sized drones that carry poison! Offscreen jobbers armed with shotguns!—that it rather made up for the lack of novelty in the previous episodes. Connecting it to the AA group seemed a touch unnecessary; someone would've found Piller's body eventually, and the weirdness of the shotgun pellets would've been enough to draw in Sherlock, yes? But it was really just there for Sherlock to obtain possession of that heroin from the drug delivery service, a temptation trigger that I imagine will be pulled in sooner rather than later.



ADDITIONAL CLUES


– It took me until this week to realize that Elementary has turned Everyone, its ersatz Anonymous, into a replacement for the Baker Street Irregulars, Holmes' network of street-urchin informers. It's not a bad update of the concept, and Elementary employs Everyone in the same way that Doyle used the Irregulars: as a narrative shortcut, to conduct offscreen/off-page information-gathering. Elementary may just be leaning on them a little too often.

– Ms. Hudson! So nice of you to swing by for a quick appearance! Feel free to visit more often! Always happy to see Candice Cayne getting work.

– The book Sherlock hid the packet of heroin from the drug delivery service in? A Library of Poetry and Song by Williams Cullen Bryant. Anyone want to propose the significance for that?


What did you think of "The Man With the Twisted Lip"?


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Watched the show three times - never was able to figure out why the girl was killed.
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So mosquito drones, eh? I though they were cute as hell. I immediately had a flash back about a spy novel where some Russians killed double agents and such by poisoning them using needles... so yes mosquito drones makes a lot of sense.

Say Noel, I really enjoyed your analysis this week!
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By the way:

"Elementary"
has just won the

PRISM Award 2014
in the category

Drama Multi-Episode Storyline – Substance Use

Congratulations!

They really deserved it!
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Joan and Mycroft is ridiculous!
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Well, since I did not see them in bed, I cannot tell... LOL!
Joan is very discreet and low key... so if she says she has had fun with Mycroft...
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Lol.....my brain doesn't want to go there...
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The review explained very well every important point in the episode. Good point to identify the AA fellows as equivalent to Sherlock's network of informants too.

I wasn't very impressed by the episode, though. Pushing Sherlocks towards the drugs is not adding any interest for me, and it feels a bit lazy. Although it is true that it gives a good frame to hear his thoughts in those brief meeting moments. That part works. But I don't like the constant threat of him falling into drugs again. I hope the threat stops when Joan moves out and he finds a new balance of his own, instead of having a grave finale with Sherlock in overdose in the hospital.

I hope Mycroft motivations turn out to be interesting. I hate it when the characters make out complicated plots for very silly purposes.
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@Noel
I don't know if William Cullen Bryant is of any significance for the show, but I like that Elementary quotes and refers to classic literature like "Waiting for Godot" or D.H. Lawrence.
So here an example for the works of William Cullen Bryant which I think also fits for Elementary:

„MUTATION.
A SONNET.
They talk of short-lived pleasure—be it so—
Pain dies as quickly: stern, hard-featured pain
Expires, and lets her weary prisoner go.
The fiercest agonies have shortest reign;
And after dreams of horror, comes again
The welcome morning with its rays of peace;
Oblivion, softly wiping out the stain,
Makes the strong secret pangs of shame to cease:
Remorse is virtue's root; its fair increase
Are fruits of innocence and blessedness:
Thus joy, o'erborne and bound, doth still release
His young limbs from the chains that round him press.
Weep not that the world changes—did it keep
A stable, changeless state, 'twere cause indeed to weep.“
William Cullen Bryant
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Oh man. Why did he take a packet if heroin and hide it? Weakness? Can we wait until middle of season 3 for that? I'm not ready for a relapse. I'm sure Joan being in danger and Sherlock being on his own will test his limits but this seems a step back for him. Over the course of this season he has been growing (as Noel pointed out above) he said so in his meeting. I just wonder if he took it to prove to himself that he can avoid it. Like a challenge. He was wants a challenge, an experiment. He stated this in the beginning when asking Joan about the case. So maybe it's that, but either way it puts his sobriety and growth in jeopardy. When Joan finds out (and she will) I think that will be the straw to break the camel's back. Not being in danger because Joan has always known the risks involved.
As for Mycroft.....did anyone notice that he seemed a little disheveled? Sure he charmed the pants off Joan but he seemed different. Regardless of whoever is involved in taking Joan, and the hopes of the result of that, I've got a feeling it may backfire. Mycroft might just need to be honest with Sherlock.
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Mmm temptation... as Wilde used to say "I can resist everything but temptation" LOL
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I think it is a challenge for him. With having a packet of heroin right under his nose and not using it he can proof to himself that he is really strong. Over the last few episodes he has had so many selfdoubts that this might be a way for Sherlock to regain a little bit of confidence. It is quite risky though.
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I am getting a funny feeling that when MyCrofts plot gets exposed, Lestrades fall from grace will be tied into it.
Reminding him of his roots.
It just seems like they are trying to maneuver Sherlock back to London for some reason.
I could be wrong - I'm very tired
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I agreed this week's case is razzle dazzle ! Very fun to watch ! Mosquito drones are the best :-) !

I highly suspect Mycroft wanting to be with Joan is sincere. There is an end game though I am still unsure if whether the show will actually made Mycroft a villain.
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This French mob stuff sounds like BS. It's obvious that who ever Mycroft is working with, or for wants Sherlock back in London. The only thing keeping Sherlock from going back, is Joan. So she has to be dealt with in some way.

I highly doubt they'll kill her, so more likely she'll be used some how to make Sherlock do or give up something, which in turn will make him want to move back to London...I'm assuming.

With the next two titles being about paint and art, I'm really, REALLY hoping they'll bring back Moriarty. I just love her. So much. I don't know what Mycroft's end game is, but I hope that for some reason Sherlock turns to Moriarty to out smarty pants Mycroft. THAT would be freaking awesome.

Especially because of all of his talk about not having a peer... Jamie/Irene is his peer, she is his equal.
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I forgot something. I think the title of next weeks episode may refer to the song "Paint it Black" by The Rolling Stones. It is a song about depression. and sadness.

I look inside myself and see my heart is black
I see my red door and I must have it painted black
Maybe then I'll fade away and not have to face the facts
It's not easy facing up when your whole world is black

As much as I would have preferred the Art thing I fear it might refer to Sherlock's state of mind in the next episode.
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She might be his peer in intelligence but otherwise there are huge differences between the two.
Moriarty killed two people with her own hands and ordered the murder of numerous others. She is a psychopath not able to feel empathy. She will never really be able to love someone other than herself.
Sherlock detests violence and devotes his life to justice and the right for everybody to live unharmed. He has a lot of compassion for other people. He was even able to say something to comfort Ian ("you made him very happy") in last weeks episode although he was devastated himself.
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Yeah, yeah, yeah, ... I still love her though.
There's a reason they say opposites attract.
I think the big question regarding her is: is she capable of redemption? That's something we've seen Sherlock wondering and could be a good story line to explore. Can her powers be used for good???
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I really loved Sherlock's declaration at the beginning. He is expressing what a lot of gifted people feel. In most social settings you feel like you are wrong and don't belong. Sometimes you even think you are stupid, because everybody else seems to fit in perfectly and you yourself just don't seem to understand the "code" they are using.
It's possible to adapt yourself, but it's very strenuous, because you always have to think about what you are saying and how you do it.
When you meet up with other gifted people, it's much easier to connect and to communicate for example in Mensa.
This has nothing to do with arrogance or lack of social skills. It is just like Sherlock said, you need a peer who understands you like you are.
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In the original books by Conan Doyle and all adaptions so far, Mycroft is working for the British Government, so this could be a possibility here, too. I just don't know why this would involve destabilizing his own brother and the appearance of French criminals in his restaurant.

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I agree, I never believed Mycroft to really want to damager his brother. The prodi=ucers obviously want us to belive it. As far as I can see, there might be two stories and Mycroft will help Sherlock to get Watson back.
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Great show, great episode, can't wait to see what will happen to Joan and between Sherlock and Mycroft.
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Your analysis of Sherlock's growth is quite beautiful. I agree with everything you have written. Where we part ways in your analysis is your take on Joan's kidnapping. This part of the plot is not some "melodramatic" stunt to set up Sherlock for a drawn out struggle with his addiction. It seems much more sinister.

Going into the episode, we know that Mycroft has been plotting some scheme that seems to directly involve Sherlock. Therefore, for me at least, all of his actions and words must be viewed with suspicion. So when he began to turn on the charm with Joan, I didn't believe it. Nothing in the series has indicated that Mycroft would move across an ocean just for Joan - outside of them sleeping together (even that was suspicious, I'll address that later).

It became more suspicious when Sherlock noticed the strange man always off in the background in the restaurant. Mycroft never explained who he was, and redirected the query back to Sherlock. Anyone who watched procedurals could see that this guy looked criminally suspicious. He, and his cohort, were likely plants placed there just to trigger the instincts of the two detectives. That's why Mycroft wasn't at the restaurant to meet Joan as planned. Her Sherlock-nurtured skill for observation would tempt her to follow the cohort. It was all a show - a show produced by our dear Mycroft. And the cold opening for that show was Mycroft sleeping with Joan. Yes, it goes back just that far. When that little detail was dropped so long ago, it never felt right to me. So much so, that I initially believed that Sherlock had just jumped to a conclusion, and I took Joan's failure to confirm or deny as her attempt to only set boundaries with him. Now that Mycroft's duplicity is coming to light, it fits. My theory may be wrong, but not by much.
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It is sinister, which is why I mentioned right after the comma that the abduction's possible connection to Mycroft is what kept it from being DOA for me.

Now, just because it's sinister doesn't mean it won't be used to spur on Sherlock struggling with his addiction. The entire abduction removes Joan from his life in a way (something he's trying to prevent from happening in this episode), and in no small part due to his training and mentioning of the French mobsters to her. That's a good set up for him to spiral, self-doubt, etc.

As for the melodramatic aspect, I've always thought of melodrama as working on a spectrum as opposed to an absolute, and Elementary tends to avoid the whole "External force puts one or more of the main characters in a crisis that others needs to solve/fix," which is fine on some other shows (Bones, Castle both immediately spring to mind), so have it appear here is a little outside their pattern. It's not a horrible, or even a bad, thing, but given how the show typically operates (they tend to favor characters making a choice to be put in a threatening position, which grants some more agency), it's an aberration of their normal tone.

Contrast it to how they dodged the potential anthrax poisoning of Sherlock in the previous episode. A few other shows would've milked that, and they elected to avoid it by resolving it immediately in the next act, after the commercial break.
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When you look at the title of next week, it becomes quite likely that the abduction will bring Sherlock to the brink of a breakdown.
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Oh yes, of course, it will likely be the proverbial last straw to Sherlock relapsing. I only wanted to point out that another storyline will branch from this situation.

And yes, the melodrama of the kidnapping of a main character in Elementary does feel out of place for the tone of the show. On any other procedural, I would have seen it coming, but not here.
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They're obvious;ly working on the 'will Sherlock relapse' issue. Him putting that piece of Heroin (the blue logo was visible) in the book was a definite mark. The relation between Sherlock and Watson would never allow that to happen, but some outside interference might. When he's alone he obviously is on bigger danger then when he is with Watson.

Personally, I am not sure I like that development as the fact that he is a recovering addict is enough for the show.
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It's just nice that it doesn't rely on it very often. I really can't think of another time this has happened on the show, really, so it's not a BIG DEAL. The show's normally incredibly studious about Joan or Sherlock not bumbling in some place and getting konked on the head from behind and ending up tied to a chair, which is more than many shows in this genre can lay claim to
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I really like this show, and I would argue that all of the characters (and the actors who play them) have pretty good chemistry.
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PS: I don't want to live in a world where there are mosquito drones that can sneak in and observe anyone anywhere. Nope.

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Note to spies using mosquito drones: Just LAND and observe, you idiots? Don't be flying around so they can HEAR you!! :)

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We had never met a Sherlock before of course, but we are learning!
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I really, really hate it when characters sneak somewhere, steal something, and then stand there in a very dangerous situation and study the dang thing! Joan DESERVED to be kidnapped.

What's worse is, the writers could have accomplished the same thing without making her look stupid.
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Lesson 2: Snatch and run. Study later.
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Lesson 1: always have the eye in your back operational when you're following someone.
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It is a very intricate story that was told this week. Joan gets Sherlock involved by taking on a case of missing persons to help someone from Sherlock's AA group. Sherlock is reluctant but Joan convinces him it is the right thing to do to help someone who had been a friend to him when he needed one. Captain Greggson, like Sherlock did not think that much of the case either and pawned it off on Bell. Sherlock was much more preoccupied with Mycroft being back in his life again and making moves on Joan. The case only got interesting for Sherlock after the bodies were discovered. But then, they were more interested in the man's death than the death of Paige. If there was one flaw in the writing it was that there was no closure for the grieving sister. Sure, Sherlock admitted he has trouble caring about anyone else, but Joan would have comforted the sister.

Sherlock was also wrong, he does have a peer in Mycroft and of course Moriarity. I would not have described Moriarity as insane. I think Sherlock needs an excuse to explain his feelings for her even after all that she has done.
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I think he didn't hide the card in the book but rather a pack of cocaine with the logo on it. One of those they found at the home of one of the dead guys.

I totally expect Mycroft to have something to do with the kidnapping. I read it this way: Mycroft wants Sherlock back in London. He drives a wedge in the team, by flirting with Joan and sowing doubt in her mind. Arranges for those guys to be in the restaurant, being sure that Sherlock would pick up on it and counting on Joan to want to impress Sherlock and further investigate when they were supposed to have their meeting. Gets Joan kidnapped, takes her to London - voila - Sherlock follows. No? Well, we'll see :D
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It's also what I was thinking. On the other hand, I would never believe the show to make Mycroft an enemy of Sherlock, it's not HBO. So I am curious what the real reason is those French people were in the restaurabt all the time.
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Well, this incarnation of the Sherlock-universe seems to do a lot of things different than bevore. Female Watson, the whole Moriarty thing, anyway it wouldn't surprise me if the made Mycroft and Sherlock enemies.

But however it turns out, something shady is going on :)
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My personal guess is that there are two things going on. Mycroft trying to get Sherlock back to the UK and a French mob posse doing whatever they want. In the end Mycroft will help Sherlock in finding Watson aback but it will kill his plans to get Sherlock back to the UK. So brotherly love will win..
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This is what I'm thinking as well. I wasn't buying any of what Mycroft was selling.
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Noted and adjusted in the review (though I think it was heroin, not cocaine). Thanks for the catch.
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I've never read any of the Doyle books so I missed Anonymous replacing the Baker Street Irregulars, although a hacker collective does have similar emotional equivalency to a group of adolescent boys. I think Anonymous might be a bit more important given their technological reach but that could be me ignoring the context. You don't need people who can hack highly encrypted information if almost everything in a given time period is stored on plain old-fashioned paper.

I'm glad I nailed Sherlock's upcoming relapse, although I am upset with the writers for making it seem like the world has to be in danger in order to give him reason. Alistair's death, Joan's kidnapping, Mycroft's betrayal, I would assume many addicts would relapse having to endure just one of those traumas. I would also hazard a guess that the mundane strain of being sober can be its own motivation, so I don't know why they have to elevate Sherlock's addictive nature to a higher purpose than it is. If he's supposed to be human in the throes of addiction, then make him human.

To be honest, I feel for Sherlock. Being that smart, and knowing things other people would rather not know, you will develop a very callous personality. You can't be nice and tell the truth, the two are incompatible. As such, even when your intelligence is being used to someone's benefit, the fact that your callous behavior has made that person turn off your warning, dismiss it as jealousy or envy or whatever ego defense they need to create, really has its downsides.

However, I do think that Mycroft does feel something for Joan, which doesn't surprise me. Nor does it surprise me that Joan is more receptive to Mycroft's affections than she is to Sherlock. In many regards, Irene will always be #1 with Sherlock, so Joan's attraction to Sherlock will always be wanting. In addition, Sherlock's intelligence really does put him on another level. How do you form a social bond with someone who doesn't have the capacity to grasp who you really are, what you can do, can appreciate it on a fundamental level? And a strong social support network is one of the main things that addicts use to help them not relapse.The fact that Joan is still playing catch-up with Sherlock is half the reason why their friendship is taking the tortured route it is. How can Sherlock be expected to respect Joan when she can't recognize half the subconscious tells and reveals that Sherlock does, not does she want to listen to him when he finds them?

In something like police work, unconditional trust in your partner is vital to being able to do your job. That's because your partner acts like a safety measure, providing back-up should you get into trouble. Not trusting your partner and going lone-wolf is a great way to find yourself being chloroformed and put into a van. Sherlock can be an annoying, sometimes callous, boy who cries wolf, but even in that story, the wolves eventually showed up. My hope is that Sherlock turns to Irene and her resources to help him find Joan, relapses, but gives his belated blessing to Joan and Mycroft (I bet Mycroft is being blackmailed or pressured and is too proud to call upon his brother to help save his hide.) The more I think about it, the more Joan and Mycroft's stubborness really do highlight how compatible they are.

And Sherlock's shared custody comment was cute albeit insensitive (and Joan's comeback was priceless) but it actually was pretty close to the truth: both men want to lay claim to Joan's presence in their lives. So I think some discreet arrangement will be figured out, assuming Mycroft doesn't simply return to London and disappear off the show, which would be a bit criminal. Some emotional committment/distance for Joan would actually settle her down with Sherlock more, which his history with his brother is actually preventing him from seeing. Sometimes, when you care for someone, you have to let them make their own mistakes, even if you know better.
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Loved this episode. Thanks noel for recapping it. I love your Arrow reviews also, so PLEASE keep it up with Elementary too. I also couldn't agree with you more. Most of this season has focused to much on boring cases and less about "the relationship" between Watson and Sherlock. I am in no way proposing that these two need to end up in some romantic relationship, but the spotlight of this show has always been about their strange but interesting friendship. Plus the chemistry between them has always helped drive the show and make up for some lull's in the action.

I guess the only thing I disagree with is that I'm totally okay with the kidnapping plot. Maybe because Watson is starting to poke her nose in way to much for some dangers not to happen to her, but also I think it will only take Watson being in real danger for Sherlock to be able to finally realize internally how much he really needs Watson. Or maybe I'm just a soapy, overly dramatic women and this is my cup of tea :)
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I'll stick with Elementary one way or another for the rest of the season, though not sure if we're going to keep doing these longer reviews. (Hinges on eyeballs, budgets, the usual suspects.) Even we don't, the quicker, shorter, less in-depth reaction posts I've been doing in the community since the Olympics wrapped up will still happen.

And nothing wrong with being soapy and overly dramatic. I enjoy suds and melodrama (I watch The Fosters for pete's sake); just as I explained a bit above to gzeigler3, that sort of thing isn't normally part of Elementary's wheelhouse.
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Do a labor of love discussion for The Fosters next season :-)
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Any episode with Rhys Ifans and JLM playing off each other is a winner for me. I think the last couple of episodes are going to be belters :)
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I feel that Mycroft's manipulation of Joan will be another thing that isn't about Joan. Whether his intentions for her are genuine or simply means to an end they are being used in order to untangle Sherlock and Watson's partnership. This situation will probably just push Joan further into moving out and having her own space. Unless Mycroft is killed and Joan feels the need to stay to protect Sherlock's sobriety.
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I agree with you, I do not believe these feelings are real. In the 'Previously on Elementary' we saw Mycroft talking about his gambit and 'a different way' so at least they want us to think he's not real.
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Remember when this show was more than Sherlock and Joan dancing around their "relationship" issues and Miller making faces and twitching awkwardly in front of the camera?

This is what happens when your premise outlives your execution.
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But these relationship issues are different from the ones we get in other shows. There is in basis no sexual tension, he needs Watson to keep his life without drugs a reality. That is different and could play an imporatnt role in all off the b-stories all the time. It never should get to be the A-story.
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Part of me agrees with you. I like how in the beginning it was established that whatever the source of their "relationship" issues were and were going to be, it wasn't going to be romantic. This was not going to be a show where the two leads fall in love simply because one is male and the other female. But as the second season has worn on, it seems they have been unable to develop this friendship past - he's invades her life and privacy because he needs her as crutch/confidante/friend/security blanket/other?, and she is desperately looking for love and connections everywhere but on her own doorstep.

Neither of these characters are growing or changing, or reverting, winning, losing, triumphing, failing. We have been stuck on this treadmill all season as the writers seem to be unable to decide how to proceed. Characters are introduced, dropped or forgotten, brought back to stir things up, but I've seen/felt no discernible trajectory for the show or characters, since the first season.
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You make some sound points and you made me think about it. I would love the characters to grown and change, but I will not like that to be around a romantic issue. So they'll need another issue to make them grow and it might not be the interaction between the two of them. That's one reason I liked Moriarty as she gave Sherlock the opportunity to grow. Although Noel expressed he ,like the fact that there are so few outside interruptions, I think they might need more to keep the show going.
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Or rather your execution outlives your premise.

Damn you TV.com why no edit button??!!
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Agree about the need for an edit option, disagree with your assessment of the show. Their "relationship" is pivotal, and just as interesting if not more so as the work they do. Miller has done a fine job, I believe, in capturing Holmes' idiosyncrasies and projecting the frantic working of his brain with his skittish physicallty.
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Clearly YMMV, and in the beginning I really liked the twitchiness that Miller brought to the character, but lately it seems very overdone. There is a thin line between character and caricature, that IMO he is straddling.

But YES, this site needs a rehaul to the comment system for sures!!
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Woot woot! Can't wait for your thoughts!
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