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Elementary S02E01: "Step Nine"


One of Elementary's many, many charms is its proclivity for reworking and extending the Sherlock Holmes mythology. The show played with both Irene Adler and Moriarty to effective and profound results last season, paying respect to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's original creations while still putting a fresh and invigorating spin on them. The show earns additional good will for having never presented itself as "Sherlock Holmes BUT IN THE UNITED STATES!" Instead, it's "Sherlock Holmes comes to the United States"—which means his departure affected those he left behind in London. Elementary has never shied away from this element of its premise, whether it be the Irene-and-Moriarty plot, or Rhys arriving in "A Giant Gun, Filled with Drugs." Indeed, as "Step Nine" so very nicely demonstrated, it's always going to be a core aspect of the show. 

In keeping with that concept, the Season 2 premiere introduced Elementary's interpretation of two of Holmes' iconic supporting characters, Inspector Lestrade and Holmes' brother Mycroft, and in doing so, continued to build a show that acknowledges the wider Holmesian universe wile still making it its own.

Let's look at Lestrade first, since he was also involved in the case of the week, which involved the question of whether or not the media mogul Lawrence Pendry killed his wife. Well, it wasn't really a question of "if" so much as it was a question of "how," since the episode never really served up an alternative, but that's hardly a strike against the mystery since it was plotted well-enough. In any case, Lestrade, just as he was in the Doyle stories, was an inspector for Scotland Yard, and the one who took credit for all of Holmes' solves—though Doyle's Lestrade was already a fairly accomplished detective by the time Holmes started consulting, albeit more because of sheer determination than actual competency.


Rather delightfully, "Step Nine" pushed through on a rather intriguing "what if" scenario with regard to Lestrade: "What if, after helping Lestrade solve so many cases, Holmes wasn't there to help him? And what if he became addicted to the spotlight that accompanied so many brilliant collars?" So here we had a couple of Elementary's established beats coming to bear: the ramifications of Holmes leaving London and a new a way to illustrate and further comment on Holmes' own struggle with addiction, but through another character, as has become the norm for the series. 

So hopped up on his own positive press, and on the right track but with no way to confirm it, Lestrade latched onto Pendry as having murdered his own wife. But he lacked the wherewithal to prove what he knew to be true, and the delicate house of cards that was both his apparent ego (if the end of the episode was any indication) and his standing within the Yard collapsed. Lestrade's failure in the Pendry case landed him in a place that was no doubt similar to Sherlock's after the latter's spiral into drugs and addiction. The difference, however, was Lestrade's lack of a support system; Holmes, however much he may not've wanted it, had his father's money and, eventually, Joan. Lestrade didn't have anyone. So seeing Lestrade relapse, as it were, by claiming credit for the Pendry solve—it helped to reinforce Holmes' own sense of himself as a recovering addict. 

As far as the case itself went, I think the show stayed within its normal rhythms of giving us just enough information that if, like Holmes, you have a wide-ranging knowledge of various subjects, you'd be able to figure everything out using the clues provided. Elementary has steadily gotten better about building cases where the audience can piece things together, even if the show sometimes veers into Doyle's style of "Aha! It was this obscure pipe tobacco that helped me to solve the case, Watson!" as if everyone has a deep knowledge of different brands of pipe tobacco. That was the case here, as 3-D printers are probably still a relatively new technology to many people, but at least all the dots were there for us to connect. By the way, I'd be willing to bet that this television season sees a plethora of 3-D printer-related plots since they're very news-y at the moment.


Then there's Mycroft. I admit to being something of a Mycroft fan. In Doyle's stories, Holmes' brother was just like Elementary's Holmes described him to Joan: fat and lazy. However, Doyle's Mycroft was also even smarter than Holmes, able to solves cases without even leaving his comfy chair at the Diogenes Club. He just lacked the energy and drive to really do anything about it, once or twice referring cases that he'd already technically solved to Holmes, so that Holmes could do all the actual work. The two brothers were hardly as icy as presented here, but given Mycroft's overall inertia, they never did see much of one another.

Elementary did a nice job interpreting these aspects of Mycroft. I rather liked the series' slimmed-down and stylish version of the character, played very finely by Rhys Ifans. Initially, I saw his appearance as another example of how Holmes' departure for the States rattled those around him; I took his claims of exercise and healthy living as a reaction to his brother's addiction, a wake-up call of sorts. That Mycroft's lifestyle was instead related to illness, however, gave him a deeper motivation to want to "become Sherlock Holmes' friend." While blowing up his brother's possessions may not have seemed like the best way to go about that, it did clean the slate between them, and I'm hoping Mycroft appears a few more times.

So, all in all, a very good premiere. What did you all think?



OTHER CLUES

– I loooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooved Joan's tee-shirt in this episode. Though, really, both Joan and Sherlock have the best clothes.

– "He intends to bed you!" I really liked how, at first, Joan ignored Sherlock's jabs about Mycroft's intentions and Joan's supposed transference of sexual desire. She's just so mature and confident that it felt realistic for her to take some more prodding before getting into a lightweight argument about it with Sherlock.


– Langdale Pike is a character from the stories. He was something of a gossipmonger, so being a CCTV observer actually makes a lot of sense.

– I thoroughly enjoyed how calmly Sherlock and Mycroft were, sitting on that bench as the storage space exploded.

– I really hope someone was looking after Clyde and the bees while Sherlock and Joan were away.

– Music choice while writing the review: Vivaldi's "Four Seasons" with Janine Jansen on the violin.

– I am obviously not Lily. Apologies to those of you who were expecting her particular brilliance and having to settle for me. Also, we're still undecided on whether Elementary will be receiving weekly reviews this season. If you'd like them to continue, please let us know in the comments, and get your friends and neighbors to read and comment as well! Regardless, be sure to join the Elementary community if you haven't already!

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Great review Noel. I'm just catching up on Elementary now and after Lily's reviews spoiling the surprise of the Irene/Moriaty storyline, I was starting to search for another TV review website. I deliberately don't read the comments section in case someone spoils a future episode. I come here to read the review for the episode I just watched to get a different perspective and check if there was any detail or plotpoint that I missed. So for Natalie Dormer's upcoming appearance as Irene to be announced in Lily's review of S01E20 AND in the very first paragraph of the next review for her to mention that a lot of readers commenting that Irene may be Moriarty, with no spoiler alert, was pretty poor reviewing.
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Reviews pleaseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

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Sean Pertwee was great in this!
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Yes please. I love tv.com reviews and would love to read one about the Elementary episodes!
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Excellent review. Please keep them coming!!!!
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oh come on Elementary is GREAT!
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weekly weekly weekly weekly!
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Keep the reviews coming
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Awesome episode and great review! Please keep em coming :)
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Great review, please keep them coming :)
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Being that this is a show that seems to be liked by the reviewers, I'd like the reviews to continue :)
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Well, for what I have seen Noel Kirkpatrick writing is never insulting to people that like the show, as he expresses his opinions with moderation, but he does express them, so be ready for him to say when he doesn't like something, because he will :)
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Staff
Yeaaaah. This is very true. I don't want some bait-and-switch confusion happening when I dislike an episode and suddenly I hate the entire show and its audience and then killed a puppy.

It's possible to love something and still be critical of it. We can hold two conflicting ideas in our brains at the same time. :)
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I wasn't quite meaning that you would kill a puppy lol I see the point though, I get it when episodes aren't liked by the reviewers, sometimes episodes just aren't quite what the show can be :)
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Keep the reviews comming please.
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Love the reviews, please keep them coming.
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After watching this episode I realized how much I missed Sherlock's and Watson dynamic, I really love how they are presented as partners that care for each other.
I am also really pleased with the crime and solving of the week, it has gotten way better than it used to.
Loved the whole blowing the storage unit bit.

Please do go on with the reviews
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Please keep the reviews coming.
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Quite enjoyable London sojourn. Would love a repeat.
Do go on with the reviews.
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I was prepared to dislike Elementary, coming so soon after the utter brilliance of BBC's Sherlock. But lo and behold, Elementary is no bastard child or defective clone, but a mature, stand-alone version of our favourite detective.

Being a big fan of BBC's Sherlock, I am always taken a bit by surprise when they do Very Different Things with their characters, and Mycroft and Lestrade was no exception. I LOVE BBC's Lestrade, so seeing this sad "addict" version was painful - but it still rang true.
The same for Mycroft - this was not the all-seeing, all-knowing, back-stage manager of the British government, but a wholly different creature. And although it took a little while, at the end of the episode he too rang true, no longer a 2-dimensional lightweight, but a true brother with all the ups and downs of such a relationship.

Good start for the new season, looking forward to more.
And keep the reviews coming, please! :)
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Elementary is definately a show that deserves to be reviewed every week.
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I would very very much like a review each week! Also, King & Maxwell did an episode where they had someone kill a subject in the FBI building with a plastic gun from a 3D printer, but I still didn't solve this one!
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Mycroft was brilliantly done. He was more arrogant than Sherlock, very posh, but you kinda feel bad for him because he has a disease. On the other hand, Lestrade was less brilliantly but good enough characterization.

I was hoping they'd stay in London for another episode. I was honestly expecting a two-parter. Oh well. Elementary is great when the episode isn't about common police procedural stuff.
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To be honest, I didn't feel bad for him because he was ill, but because Mycroft couldn't bring himself to communicate with his brother.

Granted, that wasn't the way normal brothers communicate with each other, but they did communicate, in a way that rang honest to them, Mycoft made peace with Sherlock and Sherlock felt forgiven by his brother. They are even = they are okay.
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I only just watched the episode and still feel WAY too excited to think about it critically or to say anything thoughtful about it. So I'll just say PLEASE keep doing weekly reviews. This show is so beautiful and inclusive and original and did I mention beautiful. Getting to come here every week and extending the joy of watching an episode only makes it better.
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Oh please don't stop reviewing, I love your reviews!!! I love Elementary and I love the things you guys write about, please don't stop!!! ^.^
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This felt like it should've been a more properly explored double episode. There was so many themes opened here that were treated far too sparsely - and several, imo, are really location specific.
More of the workings of excellent Sean Pertwee's Lestrade would of been appreciated. In that Lestrade's 'finer points' involved him in jumping wildly to an incorrect conclusion whilst deriding Holmes but later rewriting the correct conclusion as his - colleges have a picture of him beside definitions for plagiarism to this day. And that angle would've been entertaining to witness but instead we had a rather all too hasty and Americanised schmaltzy version. The mock grenade incident and the concluding reinstatement of Lestrade felt like the writer for this episode had watched far too many Law and Order ones.
Ifans was good as per, but the twist of him as a, somewhat, lothario restaurateur without insight beyond food and wine fizzled for me. The US version is ever seeking spins on the original but the whole point to these two is their parrying of minds. Unless it transpires that this Mycroft uses the foodie image to hide behind, I for one will remain disappointed.
I like Lui with the caveat that she's displaying emotion. Watson was the heart and emotion for Holmes dryness which is often sorely missing here.
Millsie is definitely the meat of this show but it wouldn't hurt to keep the irritant of scurvy away with more consistent veg asides.
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You would think someone who puts down all things American and writes like a snotty Brit would know that it is NEVER "would of" but always "would have" (although you do use the correct contractions). And learn how to spell (or type) Lucy LIU (yeah, I know those three-letter names are troublesome.)
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If posting on this site equates to an English test you just failed above, Mr not so smart arse. Period.
You're obvious lack of intelligence, grace or wit further suggests the need for an ignore button.
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It's only the first episode of the season and two brand new characters from the Holmesverse were introduced. I wouldn't write them off so quickly. I feel fully comfortable saying that they will most likely be back sometime during the season and some of the things you mentioned might be explored. There are 23 more episodes to go and this show likes to take it's time. Thank god.
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Don't get me wrong, I hope they do. I just wanted more. They took the actual trouble of going to Blighty (and not some of the usual dodgy 'old English' architectural shots blatantly US based) but buggered off too soon for my liking. I'd of liked for the 'newbs' to be meted out at the beginning rather than may be later. Lestrade's character exploration, in particular, is knackered as far as the audience getting to see the man's machinations and going; oh, what a snake!
The show not only remains a fave for me but a decent reinterpretation too which is rare. The fact it gets me thinking about it proves this.
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The thing is... Bones did a two part episode at the beginning of one of the latest seasons that happened in London (and sorry to say, but that was a lot better than this one, even if the show in general isn't). Maybe they didn't want to repeate the Bones exercise? Also, it might be that there is more London showing in coming episodes of the season, now that some other characters have been introduced...
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Yeah, may be. Even Parks and Rec' had a two-parter start in the UK!!
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Great first episode, and please keep reviewing!
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that cop had wierd looking eyes
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THEY WERE SO SMALL!
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I am so happy that they finally decided to introduce Mycroft and that he's played by Rhys Ifans ( even his name is cool). Like you I have always been a Mycroft fan and absolutely love his presentation here. I thought the last scene involving both Sherlock and Mycroft sitting there all British proper while Mycroft blows our hero's stuff just fierce.
The 3-D gun ploy has already come out in other stories as the real case of a man replicating such a gun made the news. It was fine, but really just that.
I think that this will be a promising season and I can't wait to see the other episodes.
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My favorite thing about Mycroft is that he nailed the earnest whispering like only Sherlock has done on this show.

I can't wait to meet their father!
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Although it has never been made clear in the Conan Doyle canon, the fact that Sherlock is an investigator and Mycroft in the intelligence community tends towards their father being either a landowning aristocrat or higher up in the civil service. Until recently, and certainly in Doyle's times major intelligence officers were recruited at Oxford or Cambridge among the best students. While they alluded to their father being some kind of business man, I think there must be more to that. I do hope we meet him as well, as with two sons of such great intellect, he cannot be but a brilliant man himself, at least.
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maybe the mother was the brilliant one and the father is just the good-looking one :) just joking, I agree with you, I also want the father to be a part of the story in this adaptation and have high hopes for that character!
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Whoever was the pretty one, I want their father to be the earnest whisperer one: the Holmes completely mastered the move!
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@ElisaDiaz: I personally agree that the right/left brain competition is not necessary in this case. I was surprised to find out that there is quite an extensive debate on the brothers' parents who are not mentioned as such in the Doyle canon. From what I did gather though, is that there is a high tendency among the debators towards them losing their mother as young children. However, as the father is mentioned in this series, the British series has been mentioning the mother, and Moffat has given signs that she might appear in that series. While it is wild speculation, one can imagine that since both series exist concurrently, a tacit arrangement between both productions would be in place to assure that the plots do not harm the overall success of both series. If that is the case, then we might meet the father here if Sherlock meets his mother there, or vice versa.
At that point, we will have a better chance to assess the intellectual genetics of the brothers.
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To kerkesh: yes, my joke was indeed referring to the famous one you told :)

I'm still skeptic about the left side / right side of the brain competition in this show. And I mean because the different types of brain powers are being assigned to genders. There seem to be general differences in the male and female human brain in this sense, but I think it is dangerous to generalize it. And this show is always going to be at the edge of that, which makes me nervous. So it's probably too late now to change the artist mother, but if i could, I'd get an artistic minded father, and a logical minded mother that would work for MI6 (so we can see more of her). Just to get some balance :)
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You know the story; Sir Bernard Shaw is accosted at a party by Isidora Duncan and she tells him something like:
Isadora Duncan: You are the greatest brain in the world and I have the most beautiful body, so we ought to produce the most perfect child.
George Bernard Shaw: What if the child inherits my beauty and your brains?
There is actually no reason why both parents are/were both brilliant.
A google search mentions The Greek Interpreter where Sherlock mentions that his grandmother was the sister of the French painter Vernet and he splendidly says that Art in the blood is liable to take the strangest forms.” With that respect, one can gather that his mother was an artist of French descent and maybe the genius of the brothers is the perfect balance of both sides of the brain, even if Sherlock would rather die than acknowledge it.
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I've always pictured the mother as an intuitive intelligence, much like Joan or Irene (and, I suspect, Mycroft's fiancee) and the father as the analytical one.

But they could always suprise me by making Mr. Holmes the emotionally intuitive spy, and Mycroft & Shelock's mom the analytical one.
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I wonder if we will meet him at all or will always be in the shadow
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Whatever they'd go for, I'm sure it would be interesting.
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Hopefully Mycroft will be in a few more episodes
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As a distinguished member of MI5 and not a restaurateur!
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Just because Elementary's Mycroft uses his smarts to create steady jobs and make people happy doesn't mean he's not as bright. He did figure out a way to make peace before Sherlock would.

Mycroft might be doing greater things in his line of work than Joan & Shelock in theirs (for one, he gets to the conflict before murder ensues).
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I never questioned Mycroft's intellect. One job can be a cover for another; so he can still provide jobs and be a spy, right?
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i read somewhere he is going to be in a few more episodes!!
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Cool
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I loved this. Am sorry but a lot of times I am not able to solve the cases. The 3D Printer was amazing and the milk bottle. Loved that. I really am not so sure of Mycroft, he out britsished the british for me. All in all am glad the show is back!
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I think you should do the reviews..(Love Lily too)..EVERY WEEK!!
Here is why, I like (again!) how you connected characters/trivia info from the "source" material to the episode. I said "again" because you do that in your other reviews too (the ones whose source are comic books at least!)..but you do it in such a way you dont give out spoilers and in some cases explain something (e.g Langdale Pike). These little info helps us see how good they adapted from the source. ..And in my mind "Elementary" and "Sherlock" is a parallel universe thingy. So Pike is a CCTV observer here...gossip-monger in Doyle's work..so in "Sherlock" if i see a blogger or such named Pike, i will know what's up.
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I agree! One of the many reasons why this show should be reviewed every week. I truly hope they will keep it up :).
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yes! I agree... and although a lot of viewers of this show do not want to compare it to the source material, or to other adaptations of Sherlock Holmes, it is always good to know how close or not the characters are. That's a long debate right there! (And debates are good, because they mean the reviews will stay...!)
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Wouldn't it be more cool if the same person (Noel) who review this show , gets to review the other adaptation (Sherlock)?? ..Just so we can keep on debating the deviation from the source!.
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don't remember who reviewed Sherlock, but yes, that could be interesting - crossing over communities and discussing this stuff
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OH PLEASE DO REVIEW THEM EVERY WEEK!
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Keep the reviews coming!
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Brilliant season 2 opener. I didn't know it was going to be in London and having Rhys Ifans as Mycroft was an even more pleasant surprise. I think this season is going to blow season 1 away :)
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I really dont understand why there are so few of the listed Contributors doing reviews in the first place - so yes i think Elementary should be reviewed every week.

I like the fact that the twists on the source material have actually worked. The casting choices have helped, but the writing has been a boost too. The fact that they added to to the original rivalry between Holmes and Mycroft was cool.

BTW - The Batman shirt = I got that nightwear set for an ex girlfriend from an online shop
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Who do you mean by a listed contributor? I don't do reviews for shows that i contribute to (or an editor for) if staff is already doing it. Unless I radically disagree with the staff member, which I never have. Unfortunately, since staff reviews most of the shows I edit...

Also keep in mind that Contributors aren't necessarily writers. Copying a quote, or adding a cast member, is a different talent set then writing a review.

If you're referring to staff "listed contributors," most freelance writers are writing reviews, aren't they?
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On the newspage sidebar there is a list of 15 contributors - the freelancers who get paid
Last night, 5 of those did reviews, which was the highest number for a while
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Some appear to handle news and column-style work rather than reviews. Some, such as Emily Gordon and Bill Kuchman, don't appear to be working for the site anymore. My guess would be that TV.com wants a certain amount of non-review writing, and that's what they have.
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I suggested to Pat earlier in the week - putting posts that have been "voted" up by tv.com staff on the sidebar of the news page.
There are a lot of good articles in the communities being ignored and proper promotion of volunteer contributors would possibly encourage more members to submit reviews for shows that are being ignored
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Depends on if he's referring to volunteers, or freelancers such as yourself, Noel.

Speaking as a volunteer, there's not much incentive for me to write a review. It might show up on the Best of Community Posts, it might not. Or if it does, it won't stay there long. I wouldn't expect TV.com to pay me money, but swag, contribution points accurately representing the amount of work involved, or even simple acknowledgement for more than 12 hours, would be non-financial incentives. They cost nothing (other than S&H on the first), but apparently it's more than TV.com wants to "pay."

When tv.com makes it worth it for people to write reviews, more people will write reviews.
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Staff
I treated it as freelancers, not the volunteers.

To your point: I think it hinges on how you want to use the community space. if you want to write a review, write a review. Post a funny gif related to the show. Just want to get a discussion going? There's a button for that, too. I've used it a couple of times already to try and get Bones going there (unpaid, I would add).

It's a flexible enough space to be used as multiple things for the members of that community. For some, the incentive the possibility of interaction and getting a voice out there. Just depends on how you want to use the space and your time.
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Oh, I've had no problem doing that. The question is reviews. I don't want to write a review if it's going to be buried somewhere. As I'm sure you know, writing a good review is more than just pushing a button. :)

But Pat wants to talk about it offline, so since we've reached the end of the reply chain, I'll deal with it there.
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oh my... at least so far we have more comments than Lucky 7!!!
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AHA!!!! Hiding answers to my questions in a review i shall never read about a show i'll never watch. Oooh i smell a conspiracy!!

However TVcom_editorial wrote "If we hire more people, are you offering to pay their salaries? ;)" - I wasnt talking about hiring new staff, but using the contributors listed, but i guess the answer would be the same
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While we may not have the budget needed for our staff and freelancers to review every great show on TV, the increase in longer form posts in the our Communities will also help to close the gap. Even a quick discussion post can kickstart the conversation and we're promoting the best posts to the homepage and via our social media accounts.

So if you have any interest in writing about a show each week, you'll have every opportunity to grow your own group of readers.
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I don't think users want to compete against other users, either. At least one user has said that very thing for one show that I write reviews for, that staff doesn't.
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Assuming the show has a community page...

i understand the economics of not giving every show a community page, and only giving the popular ones community pages. But if freelancers write the reviews for the popular shows, that doesn't necessarily leave much to review for everyone else. And I don't think people want to "compete" against staff. It's an unpleasant Catch-22.
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My keen deductive skills tell me that this may be a trap.
I understand now.
My nemesis MacFarlane has taken control of patsully's account.
Touche MacFarlane, Touche.
I may indeed be forced to engage in this 'Game of Shadows'(TM) scenario you have devised.
In fact there have been discussions of a review for Bansheeeeeee, considering the fact that the cabal you are associated with decided to ignore it previously.
The game made indeed be afoot!!
Well played you ingenious b*stard, well played

Note - I really dont know why i decided to go for a Basil Rathbone Sherlock Holmes tone for these replies.......but i feel kinda good about it ;-)
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Pretty much.
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AHA! So you admit to hiding the answers elsewhere!
My deductive skills are legendary.
Holmes is not the only master detective!
It was a cunning plan to hide the answer where no sane person would look.....but you slipped up and fell into my cunning trap, unwittingly giving me all the information i needed.
This neatly ties up the case of "The dearth of reviewers", which leaves me free to continue with my other investigation, the case of "Who thought Dads was a good idea for a sitcom" - a truly horrific and puzzling case!
There are links to a shadowy figure known only as "MacFarlane", who, it is suspected, has inflicted numerous atrocities on mankind and must be stopped
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I loved this episode. MY UNIVERSITY WAS IN IT! Sorry I loved seeing it in London. I liked the story, I liked the animosity between Holmes and Mycroft and them making up (sort of) I love the weekly reviews so I hope to still see them. (nods)
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I really like the way that the producers of this show have modernized the story but kept the original traditions of the Holmes\Watson legacies. Miller and Liu have great chemistry and I enjoy their performances. I started watching this show in season one on a lark and haven't missed an episode. I truly missed it during the summer hiatus and hope it has a long and successful run.
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My thoughts- I had a few reservations about the second season, and I worried tht it would be a slow and boring progression like season 1 until the start of the actual story arc (In season 1's case Moran and the Moriarty arc) but here I see I was thankfully wrong. The new characters were interesting, and I do love Sherlock's brother after learning he had no romantic interest in Joan. (The sibling/doppleganger going after the partner romantically is a tired cliche. Bones and Suits did it, with predictable results.) I like Mycroft and how, after blowing up Holmes's stuff, Sherlock actually seemed more impressed rather than angry. I doubt Mycroft will have many appearances on the show, but I hope that if he does, he will be a part of season 2's main story arc.

Another thing that impressed me is how good Watson has become at deducing and general detective work. She's become a lot more assertive, voluntarily giving clues away rather than waiting in the background until Sherlock calls on her. Considering it was HER plan that eventually took down the Big Bad last season, I'd say by the end of season 2 she could be just as good, if not better, as her mentor. I also like how Watson was able to kick the opening case's suspect's ass at the beginning of the episode.

Lastrade is a bit of an oddity, not in his character but in the fact that Holmes would give him the credit. Holmes at the beginning of the series was a egotistical jerk, who preferred working alone, though he would always talk about his glory days in Scotland Yard. All of the people Holmes associated himself with knew about his exploits before they even met him, so to have Holmes hand off the credit on ALL his cases to someone else seems really out of character for him.

All in all, great opener and I have high hopes for the series now that Holmes and Watson are buddies and not bickering like they were for half of season 1.
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In the scene where they find Pendry's accomplice stabbed, Watson speaks the known, by the two of them, facts aloud while you can see Holmes using that as an aid to his deductive reasoning.

It is a great illustration of their partnership. Holmes is stumped and you can see Watson's reiteration of the facts in a, to Holmes, useful way leads him to discover the plastic gunfragment in the apple.
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Holmes is an egoistical jerk, but it's never extended to his doings being splashy and public, largely because he figured no one would really care. It's why he was amused, in the stories, that Watson wanted to chronicle the cases.
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I think Elementary may be one of only two procedurals at the moment (the other being Person of Interest) that can get away with having reviews for every (or almost every) episode, most of which I think has to do with the fact that Sherlock Holmes has such a rich history that a lot of people would like to compare with. Anyway, I may not always have something to say about it, but I think it'd be nice to see an Elementary review every week.

As for this episode, I really liked it. During the time off, I never really felt like I missed Elementary as I've never quite considered it must-watch-TV or one of my favorites. But watching it brought back some good memories, and I immediately remembered how much I liked the Holmes-Watson relationship, and JLM/Liu as actors. Seeing the London side of things was cool, although I wasn't a big fan of making Lestrade seemingly incompetent -- although, if the point was that he was smart but just got carried away trying to solve the most complex cases possible, that seems better.
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Hey, that's a good point actually, if only for the comparisons with the source material, it is worth to keep the reviews up.
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Well, I liked the ep in general but somehow didn't find it as compelling as other ones...
And yes I would luv you continued to review them as often as possible Noel!
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I think it would be nice if elementary was reviewed every week.
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Hear, hear!
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"London, like New York, is a beacon of freedom and a target for terrorists. It is, as a consequence, one of the most observed cities in the world." - says Sherlock. Hard to believe he could be so ignorant. ;-)
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Yeah that freedom line jarred on me as well, more like US propaganda than a Holmes-ian interpretation of London given it's cloak and dagger history. Glad they didn't make his brother "Microsoft Holmes" and wasn't keen on that character's departure from the literature much until blowing up Sherlock's things was his way of getting closer with his brother. Can't go wrong with Sean Pewtree as Lestrade.
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Defenitely liked the choice for Microft! Lestrade was just ok. However, I found the season start a little too soft, after all the Moriarty noise at the end of last season.

Did I understand correctly that Sherlock was happy because Microft had to actually read the bomb-making books and make his own bomb to blow away his stash, hence he wasn't lazy anymore?

I didn't quite like the choice of the 3D printers for a case... It is fashionable in news to talk about this lately, but maybe tomorrow they come and say that this doesn't actually work or something, and then this episode would be outdated for eternity. I wonder what else they might have added to this season trying to stay at the latest trends.

I am not a core fan of this show, but i do watch it and comment, so I hope you fellow commenters will have patience with me when we disagree :)
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Yes, that's what you're supposed to draw from the explosion.

3-D printed guns are actually a thing, and they work if made properly, as the episode demonstrated. The procedural's ability to tap into zeitgeisty things is actually one point in its favor over more deeply serialized programs: They can comment on trends and "the now" much quicker. They often can't provide the ideological and/or thematic depth that a serialized program can, so trade-offs.
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Yup, as noelrk said "3D printed guns are actually a thing" Just like the episode said: you can print out the entire gun, just add a nail for a firing pin, and use low-velocity 22 rounds. Hence the gun exploding in the kitchen, he used the wrong ammo that time.

However they are only good for a low number of shots and quality varies. For example, an imperfection in the plastic could cause it to explode.

It's been confirmed, there are videos, and in fact some big museum wants to put the original one up as an exhibit.
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Did not realize how much I missed this show until watching it last night! Awesome as always, and as for the reviews, can each of my yes's count as one vote? If it does then yes keep the weekly recaps going! Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes!
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Like I stated above, anyone who is not watching this show is missing out.
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Loved it, and I'm among the minority who will actually say this is better than BBC's Sherlock. Reason being despite being more of a procedural, this is more true to Doyle's Holmes which is not even up for debate. The writing is great and Miller does an excellent job. The Holmes/Watson is much enjoyable to watch.

The premier was great. Loved both Lestrade and Mycroft. And the batman tee is a win :D
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"this is more true to Doyle's Holmes which is not even up for debate."

Really? No debate? If you say so, I guess it must be more true.
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Keep up the weekly recaps!
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Loved this episode. It felt a little off from last season but that always happens to me when a show films in a different location.

Please don't stop these reviews. Between Castle's reviews being axed and now possibly this, I will have no reason to visit this site. I know that's selfish but I can't live without my tv.com addiction.
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I love how modern elementary is,... the stories are relatable,... the characters are relatable,... and this is a great accomplishment for this series,...
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Could not agree more. I think that a good story when prooperly written and presented plays in any time period.
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I was glad to see Sean Pertwee get some work as Lestrade. I've liked him ever since the old Cadfael mysteries (with Derek Jacobi) were still airing, possibly even before that.

I've never been able to fully enjoy this show or its British counterpart as I'm a bit of a purist when it comes to Holmes. I appreciate the desire to do a modern reinvention of him and I think both Cumberbatch and Miller have done decent jobs portraying him. I'm not sure which I prefer, to be honest. All I know is that Jeremy Brett is and always will be my favorite version of him. To me, he epitomized Holmes as Sir ACD wrote him.

What I definitely know I don't like about CBS' version is Lucy Liu's Watson. She chronically underacts and/or underemotes and just gives one flat performance after another. I groaned when I read that she was cast in the role and she's still not convinced me that she'll ever be a great actress. I agree that less can often be more but not when it comes to her performances.
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I love this show, keep reviewing!
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I liked the episode a lot, but I felt it would have been better served splitting it into two, maybe three episodes, give us a chance to see more of Sherlock's pre-New York life.
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Based on the endingg, I made the assumption that that is planned.
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that could have worked for me too!
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I liked the episode.
When we encountered Mycroft, I was expecting more of a traditional representation of him. But I hope that there's more to him then just a restaurant mogul.


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Enjoyed this season opener and the nice twists on the classic elements of the Holmesain world.
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I enjoyed Mycroft blowing up Sherlock's things. It's the little twists they do in this version of Holmes that I enjoy so much. I chuckle every time Holmes tries to push Watson to take care of her needs.
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