An Elementary Community
Sunday 10:00 PM on CBS (Returning October 2, 2016)

Elementary S02E12: "The Diabolical Kind"


Loving and caring about other people is a sticky, sticky business. It can leave you caught between competing impulses and make life very knotty in ways that aren't always clearly untied. Yet, here we are, a race of organisms that devotes endless amounts of time and culture to love. We create poems, plays, novels, sculptures, paintings, songs, religious and secular ceremonies, films, TV shows, advice columns, websites, and flimsy pieces of red construction paper adorned with lace, all to think about and signify that we can love. The enduring multitude of these avenues, however, indicates just how little we actually understand it.

It's little wonder, then that Sherlock and Moriarty spent much of their correspondence discussing it, attempting to make sense of this emotion that is as layered and complex as they themselves are. It's the ultimate mystery, and neither of the two can just let something as interesting as love slide away, even if they think it's not for them but end up behaving otherwise.


This season, as I've mentioned time and time before, has seemed dedicated to Sherlock coming to grips with his relationships and his connections to other people. His denied guilt and then attempted apology/offer of assistance over Bell's shooting coupled with his willingness to take on an sponsee in the last few episodes only strengthens this notion for me. The show isn't being subtle about it, and that's fine. I'd rather it be a little obvious than overly muddled, and it continues to offer up interesting ways for the show to explore character dynamics as a man who has eschewed connections, and claims to still be doing so behind occasionally flimsy pretenses like studying the mind of a criminal genius, sudden faced with the occasionally happy burden of many valued connections.

What's been nice about this is that while the focus is largely on Sherlock, Elementary has expanded this idea of connecting with others to its other characters. So while we see Sherlock dealing with more connections, Joan has, all season, been attempting to maintain and forge new connections, only to find them lacking in a number of ways in comparison to the rewards she receives with Sherlock. As he pulls closer to others, she's pulling away. Even Gregson and Bell have their place in this, the former with his wife and the latter with where he fits in on the police force now that he can't always perform the duties required of him. It's rare for a procedural to be as thematically unified as Elementary is, but here we are.

Of course, thematic unity doesn't always pay off dividends in terms of interesting narratives, or, indeed, always feels organic to the show, and such is the case with "The Diabolical Kind." Moriarty's return to the stage offered a nice variation on the season's big interests, but in a decidedly contrived way. 

To be sure, there's good stuff to be had in Moriarty (Natalie Dormer, still having a ball) worming her way in as a consultant on the case, particularly her fascination with and her planting seeds of doubt in Joan's mind about Sherlock's commitment to her. It was one of those "I know you know that I know you know that I'm trying to manipulate you" sort of scenes, and yet it still worked because it ultimately could turn out to be true: Sherlock could become bored with Joan, and then where would Joan be, especially if it happened sooner rather than later? It's a nice thread to complement and complicate Joan's steady disengagement from the non-crime solving world.

That Moriarty had a daughter -- thank goodness it wasn't Sherlock's as I might've destroyed my TV set -- was the niggling issue in the episode. She acts in the interest of protecting her daughter, a daughter she barely knows -- though I imagine she has/had the resources to monitor her as much as she likes -- despite claiming not to have the empathy necessary to do such things. She'll leave false clues in sketches and slit her own wrists to neutralize shock cuffs, all at serious risk to herself. These are the actions of a character who knows love, but still cannot understand why she knows it. That it's for her daughter, one we only learned about this episode and in the last 10 minutes of the episode, however, makes the connection to the season's big theme feel forced, a last minute attempt to jolt some larger meaning in her actions in the episode beyond being a mischief-maker, and to give some urgency to an otherwise rather dull case of the week.

Of course, that Moriarty would act in this way may only strengthen Sherlock's resolve that she will, contrary to Watson's assertion -- "There is no Irene, only Moriarty. And Moriarty is never going to change." -- undergo a metamorphosis similar to the one that he started experiencing upon his arrival in New York, one that he no doubt desires her to experience. It would mean that they could be together again, could trust again. It would also ultimately mean that Sherlock wasn't completely wrong about her, and we all know how much he likes being right. Even her decision not to kill Mattoo (Faran Tahir, who I hope comes back for more) indicates a possible change in her behavior.

The challenge is that, much like the with potential ways Mycroft could swing, Moriarty could be playing a very long game with all of this, a bit of manipulation to see if she can destroy Sherlock and Joan's relationship somehow or some other evil plot that this was ultimately just the first phase of. It'd be a less interesting route than the potential reform, but I also just think reform isn't in the cards for Moriarty, no matter how much Sherlock may want it, and no matter how much he protests that he's not interested in playing the game of love.



ADDITIONAL CLUES


– "The woman is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside of an enigma I've had sex with. I would be lying if I said I was the strongest assessor of her motives at this point."

– Bell only received a brief scene this week as he attempted to fire his gun at the practice range. I appreciate that his recovery is being treated as a longterm story, but what about the intelligence task force? Maybe some tidbits about it next week?


What did you think of "The Diabolical Kind"?


126 Comments
Comments (78)
Submit
Sort: Latest | Popular
I just saw this... HOLY SHIT. THIS WAS POWERFUL. I think this is my current favorite episode of the show. It's even better than the M episode.
Reply
Flag
This show is great with its regular cast, but Natalie Dormer makes everyone around her better. I absolutely love her as Moriarty. In fact, I think she's a better Moriarty than Andrew Scott in BBC's Sherlock, and that's saying a lot because I love his portrayal as well. She's fantastic and she turns great episodes into amazing episodes.
3
Reply
Flag
Bell should use his other hand.
2
Reply
Flag
I don't know if I'd go so far as to call the story "contrived", perhaps a touch convenient, but given the greater context of Holmes, Moriarty and their connection with the rest of the world as well as with each other, a daughter (which we'd have no reason to know or not know about) seems as reasonable a tie as any.

Moriarty: "How do you get by being one of them?"
Holmes: "I don't know that I am"

I think that little exchange summed up perfect just how different these two are from the rest of the world and how similar they are to each other. What is it they say, the best cops would make the best criminals and visa versa. They're an experience away from being each other which in the classic tale makes them fantastic rivals. But here, Moriarty as a love interest is one of the best spins I can recall in a LONG LONG time. That Natalie Dormer can do no wrong doesn't hurt none either.

The creators have been very good so far at being original, but I can see them taking the "easy" way out and having Moriarty redeemed (see acquitted as hinted in this episode), rekindle the romance with Holmes only to realize that while she may be able to love, true change and being "good" isn't for her leading to the inevitable betrayal and the chase beings anew. The warnings and "I told you so" from Watson of course go hand in hand.

It's a little cliche, but frankly, I don't care because watching these three actors feed and play off each other is something I could never ever tire of.
More+
1
Reply
Flag
" watching these three actors feed and play off each other is something I could never ever tire of."
ditto. the most talented cast !
1
Reply
Flag
Anyone know who painted the portrait of Joan from this episode? I thought it was an amazing likeness and that it captured Joan, not Lucy Liu. The painting was also a main character - always in front and often shot physically in between the characters (see first photo capture above). I wish the painter could have been given screen credit up with the other episodic players.
5
Reply
Flag
excellent insight into the human psyche; even better because it is seen through such drastically flawed characters as Sherlock & Moriarty.
As Sherlock asks in his letter to Irene, “Have we simply failed to find the answers, or can they not be answered at all?” In the end, this episode would seem to argue, this is the threat of Moriarty. She is evil, but she is also human.
1
Reply
Flag
:) Sherlock is super-smart, and he expects Joan to believe that he corresponds with Mori for cerebral reasons? *hehehehe* Poor, Sherlock!

1
Reply
Flag
Making Moriarty a woman was the final straw for me, i bailed on it.
It's highly unrealistic, the top geniuses are always men, it's a statistical fact and far more so when talking about criminal geniuses where men predominate in the criminal arena.

This trend of replacing iconic male characters with women is troubling (Watson, Moriarty, Starbuck off Battlestar Galactica). I know the reason for it and I shall share.

The globalist elite were behind feminism. The reason that they're pushing feminsim is because men are the biggest threat to their control of the populations. In every takeover or suppression of an enemy throughout history the men were taken out first. Men are more likely to view totalitarian authority as an alpha male threat whereas women are more likely to view it as a protector (related to women liking the 'bad boys'). Men are thus more likely to challenge authority and are physically more dangerous.

Also the IQ distributions are markedly different between men and women, on average men and women are roughly equal but women's IQs are more grouped around the middle whereas men's are more spread across the spectrum, meaning there are more stupid men than women but a lot more highly intelligent men than women, and highly intelligent people are a threat as they can see through the propaganda.

Now why not just create female-centric show counterparts to the male characters?
Because, people of both sexes will just ignore them and gravitate to the more natural male/female characters/shows that ring true with their primal subconscious and sexual identity.
No, they must REPLACE the male characters with female ones in order to force people to accept and take notice, it psychologically emasculates men as their roles have been supplanted by female ones.

It's all social engineering to emasculate men, give women the power and make society more compliant and less of a threat.
More+
2
Reply
Flag
Wow Sabre.., that's intriguing. I'm pretty sure you bail on anything where a woman is or is considered the stronger sex.

There are and will always be women who excel but I'm in the belief that most live under the radar. They don't need the fame and gratitude of the masses like most men do. Most men can't live without it.

And frankly, in most societies, the woman has always been looked down upon as the child bearer or food gatherer. Who's to really know how many women's ideas have been lost down through the ages because of the man's unwillingness to listen. And since you think that most men are responsible for most criminal activities - it begs the question, I wonder how many women were responsible and people just couldn't believe a women was capable of something so heinous.

So it seems by your comments you really don't respect women and think that they can do or be anything a man is. I myself like Watson being a women who can think and talk for herself. A whole other perspective on things. And being Asian adds another wrinkle.

And Sabre, if you haven't been paying attention, there are more women in the world now than men. And in most global societies, women are starting to take control just like women in America have been doing. And honestly, over the past few years it seems that most men have been dropping the ball and maybe its time for a change.


More +
8
Reply
Flag
As ridiculous a notion as I've read in a while. This sort of thinking would lead one to believe that you'd have no interest on the show from the get go with Lucy Liu being cast as Watson...but she's Asian, and Asians are smart, so I suppose that fits into your narrow stereotypical misogynist view.

Gender and colour blind casting is one of the best things about this art medium. That an Asian woman can play the role historically written for a British man without compromising the story (to anybody by the small minded) is along the same lines as a song covered in a style very different than that of the original musician, that remains as good as the original, if not better.

If you're feeling emasculated by strong female characters, then that speaks far more about you than it does anything else.

The vast majority of great works of fiction revolve around white men and I'm sure that's the way you'd like to keep things. Luckily for the rest of us, producers are growing more and more comfortable with casting the best actor for the role, regardless of gender, race, etc. There are plenty of shows that cater to your "old boys club" so perhaps it's best you bailed on Elementary...though the Moriarty revelation happened some time ago, so either you're a liar or you're just here to spout your absurd world views. Either way, perhaps you should get back to your bailing.
More +
10
Reply
Flag
so you 'bailed' on one of the best shows on television because they changed Watson's gender?!? That is really weak. your statements just beg for jokes about your 'masculinity' - But it is so overwhelming that it obvo is not worth the effort.
10
Reply
Flag
And good grief again. Historically for the last 2000 years and to the present day women worldwide have been and continue to be subservient to men, except for a teeny tiny group of affluent Western women. And you feel threatened?
10
Reply
Flag
Good grief, could you be any more zealous of your own sex? There is nothing in this show suggesting that the writers are trying to emasculate men. All they've done is make Moriarty a love interest. Male or female, they are still EQUALS. Male or female they are still obsessed with each other. All the writers have done is try to get more viewers by making Sherlock and Moriarty lovers.
It's a good show, just enjoy it for what it is. If so clearly offends your elitist tastes, then watch something else.
19
Reply
Flag
I liked the fact that I thought 100% for sure he would throw the letters in the fire, and that was the contrivance of the fire, but that I was wrong and he tucked them away. Ever-predictable television can still be a surprise, evidently.
8
Reply
Flag
Mentor? I knew she wasn't THE Moriarty.
1
Reply
Flag
Of course the top geniuses are men, particularly in the criminal world.
It's thoroughly unrealistic.
Reply
Flag
I don't mean it like that. She just doesn't seem evil enough to be the Moriarty.
Reply
Flag
I sort of have a problem with super intelligent super villains, which Irene/Moriarty definitely is--"I see at least 16 ways to escape, and that's after you put these bracelets on me." The problem is that being super smart you would know that you can build an empire without being an out and out criminal, which should be the more desirable route...unless you're pure evil on the hoof. So, she is pure evil and Sherlock knows that. But love doesn't necessarily imply good sense so he is rather hopelessly in love with her. And none of the rest of us matter to these two super geniuses--Joan being merely a rather insignificant obstacle to Moriarty. I do agree that they're kinda fun to watch, but it's hard to care where they end up--unless one of them succeeds in bringing on the end of the world. And may I remind you, these super smart people are being written by fairly normal people. It's a riddle wrapped in an enigma, wrapped in bacon, or more commonly known as a Ridenigmacon--so tasty...
3
Reply
Flag
"The woman is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside of an enigma I've had sex with."
That is a great line. Although I believe, "...I've had sex with.", is a bit of an understatement.
4
Reply
Flag
Winston Churchill, 1939: "I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia. It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma; but perhaps there is a key. That key is Russian national interest."
8
Reply
Flag
Thank you for that. I didn't know it originated with Churchill.
Though I doubt he had sex with Russia :-)
3
Reply
Flag
It is CHURCHILL of which we speak. If anyone could copulate with an entire country, 'twould be he. :P
2
Reply
Flag
I wish I had a time machine so I could go forward to next Thursday so I could watch the next episode. Reading your comments has me so excited I can't possibly wait until then.
1
Reply
Flag
Beautiful!!!
2
Reply
Flag
I really liked this episode so much I watched it twice, even if Sherlock wasn't at his best to put it mildly. that is even before Moriarty enters the picture.
He didn't realize the kidnapping was a fake. When you kidnap somebody you're not gonna kill the ones that have to pay you. That would complicate things and they were professionals of the in and out quickly variety who don't like that kind of complications.
Sherlock not noticing that Moriarty had a baby before. I'm sure someone with his astute observational skills would notice that. He bloody noticed that a mole was gone in there previous encounter.
What intrigued me was one of the last things Moriarty said in the episode about corruption running deeper than you know. She expects to be a free woman soon.
6
Reply
Flag
Two cats don't love each other in the exact same way as two dogs or two horses or two armadillos. Why people assume others should behave as them when they fall in love still boggles my mind.

I had two misconceived notions during this episode: who the daughter was and what Sherlock was going to do with those letters when he was sitting in front of the fire (at least for a moment, until I realized he wasn't going to burn them/couldn't.) And I LOVE the fact that Irene and Moriarity are the same person. Not only that, it makes even more sense that they are. What would happen if the person you loved, and loved you back, was as complicated and damaged as yourself? They are not simply the greatest puzzles to each other but to themselves, and thus only in their reflected gazes do they begin to catch a glimpse not only of revulsion and kinship, but ultimately of acceptance.

In the episode when Sherlock is hunting the serial killer who owns a studio, he makes a very pointed and revealing monologue to Joan: "Here is your wallet. I stole it from you while you stared daggers at me not 3ft away. This is to remind you that however adept I am at solving crimes, I am equally adept at committing them." Sherlock, in this iteration, is not as far from sharing a cell with Irene/Moriarity as past iterations would have you believe. And that proximity is what makes their love all the stronger for it.

How could anyone has overlooked the HUGE Joan Watson painting she made in her studio? And anyone who believed in the simple statement of her curiosity is almost too ignorant to watch this show and appreciate what it is doing. Moriarity is JEALOUS of Joan, eventhough she would deny the truth of it to anyone who dared speak it. She masks her feelings behind a cold mask of indifference, but that painting, like Sherlock hiding her letters in her beehive, speak volumes. And her trying to throw Joan off of Sherlock by saying he would dump her, that was the cutest cat-fight-that-pretended-not-to-be I've seen on tv yet. What is even more amazing is how clueless Moriarity is to how rock-solid Sherlock is in love with her. At the end of the episode, when I was momentarily certain he was going to toss the letters into the fire, I realized he wasn't going to. And it had nothing to do with his protestations of 'hope' that he tried to give to Joan to throw her off his scent.

What would you do if the person you loved was as damaged and complicated as you: the one thing you would never do (without risk of self-destruction) would be to give them up. If he has to love Moriarity in order to love Irene, he will. And the fact that Moriarity realizes that he loves her even when he knows the truth about her, accepts her in the way he can, that is why she surrendered to him at the end of the episode. She can cat-fight with Joan and he can squirrel her letters away, but those two anti-social lovebirds will always fly back to each other. Joan is along for the ride, and the love he can spare, the effort he makes, when he can for her. The fact that a small amount of Sherlock is enough to keep her there is something Moriarity could really relate to. Let's hope her psychotic possession of Sherlock (and her revulsion at her connection) doesn't make her try to hurt Joan. Sherlock would kill Moriarity to protect Joan, if he had to, but the world is a much more interesting place with her alive in it.
More+
24
Reply
Flag
Well I'm surprised Making Irene Addler and Moriarty the same woman was good but giving her a kid was a bigger surprise. I don't know about you guys but I think she was a little too quick in saying she (the girl) isn't Sherlock's. I don't care either way.

I am curious about Moriarty's vaults. Will these plans affect Holmes in the future. She spoke of a mentor that means she is/was an apprentice. So does that mean there could be someone else to be the new Moriarty
1
Reply
Flag
New Moriarty or the actual Moriarty?
Reply
Flag
she said "my mentor who sharED (past tense) the same enthusiasms as me" while wearing a smirk...i think thats pretty straight forward that in her line of work he/she is most likely dead rather than converted his/her belief system
1
Reply
Flag
Its possible I'm reading too much into it yes but I'm saying Mentor is dead when he passed his proclivities to her and she can pass it on to the next Moriarty. You know the old Phantom comics? Phantom 1 dies his son becomes Phantom 2 takes over the business when Phantom 2 dies his son becomes P3 and takes over and so on. I'm not saying the kid becomes the new Moriarty this showed us that without her someone will likely take over the void she left.
Reply
Flag
Beautiful episode the last scene between Sherlock and Moriarty ( she's gorgeous in a way that can make a man crazy I suppose) was just beautiful TV, I think poor Sherlock doesn't know what hit him he's dodo for the lady.
I cant seem to determine if she's manipulating him or not, but it all looks beautiful.
I wish they do something clever with Det Bell character or drop him altogether this episode shows he's just not that integral to the show.
6
Reply
Flag
I thought this was a strong episode, and fitted alongside a good number of strong episodes in this season already. Please keep it up writers :)
6
Reply
Flag
I do think this episode was the clearest indicator that a lot of this seasons backstory is about Sherlock coming to grips with his relationships, but this episode was also about how Sherlock has changed the people he's interacted with.

Moriarty basically came out and said she had changed because of him.

But his affect on Watson was handled a lot more discreetly.

"I watch as Watson, eager as ever to extract some meaning from the prevailing social conventions, endures a series of curated mating rituals. It seems to me she is incrementally...less content every time she returns from one."

Is the fact that Watson is less satisfied with human interaction a result of Holmes' influence...or does she just have bad taste in men?
5
Reply
Flag
Dormer can do no wrong in my book, so I don't think I was able to view this episode critically at all. I think she's fantastic as M, and I am so glad:

1. She didn't die, a villain like this cannot be taken from the show so soon!; and
2. That the girl was not Sherlock's. That would have taken this into soap territory and been such an unexpected and sudden shark jumpage.

I think I enjoy Joan and Moriaty's chemistry even more than Moriaty/Sherlock. I wonder where the serialized aspects of the season goes from here, with Sherlock's brother as well as this. I guess there will be a few episodes before they revisit any of it.
4
Reply
Flag
I love how Moriarty and Joan interact with each other there is so much tension that I could feel myself holding my breath waiting for the physical punches and end up recieving meaningful glances, smirks and words that cut both sides. And yes a Sherlock in love is great because it gives so much depth to the character
8
Reply
Flag
I think Watson was thinking, "He's infatuated with you but he has a genuine connection with me."

On the other hand, Moriarty is thinking, "I have Holmes right where I want him."

That scene was fantastic. I went cross-eyed trying to watch both characters and their little "dance". The fact that Holmes is in the middle of this makes me shudder with anticipation.
3
Reply
Flag
She said she was getting information from a mentor. That makes me think that Irene really is Irene and the mentor is the real Moriarty. My fear is that the reveal of this information will come with Irene's death.


Irene mentioned the world's secret corruption. In the original version Mycroft worked behind the scene of British politics. I think in this version he is somehow involved in the corruption Irene mentioned, either running it or combating it.
5
Reply
Flag
I may be way off base, but I thought the mentor to whom she was referring was Sherlock. When she said he was the most intelligent person she knew, he smiled slightly.
4
Reply
Flag
This was the first time I was a little turned off by the sexual tension between Sherlock and Moriarty. Initially I felt it was a good idea to make Moriarty a woman. I thought it opens up interesting avenues for new story lines, and I still feel that way. But this episode also showed the downside of it. As a result of her being a woman, and the subsequent pull between her and Sherlock, the deep rivalry and competitiveness between them is slightly subdued. Instead they have moments like the one at the end in which they sit over a pile of bodies in an abandoned house opening their hearts to each other. The game of cat and mouse is switched to bedroom eyes in the moonlight. I don't totally hate it, but it irks me a little.

During this episode I also started thinking about what kind of relationship Sherlock and Moriarty/Irene really had back in London. What was it like? We know Sherlock failed to notice that she is a criminal mastermind. But was Sherlock all giddy during that time and walking on clouds? Was he markedly different as a person? And did Moriarty have to pretend much to be Irene or did she actually show her true self to Sherlock? He says she is "a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside of an enigma", but how was it in London? Did she ever feel confident enough as Irene to truly enjoy the time with Sherlock, as people do in real relationships, or was it all just a façade?
More+
1
Reply
Flag
I do feel that Sherlock and Moriarty were genuinely in love and it made both of them stupid, as seen with Sherlock not noticing that Irene was evil and, more importantly, the end of Heroine where Moriarty comes back to Sherlock to rub her victory over him in his face. It was more than the typical "neener neener I won!" crap that most villains do. Granted, she DID do that, but most of the conversation she had with a (supposedly) beaten Sherlock was genuine concern for his health and her offering him a chance to run away with him. Her love for him was expanded in depth this episode, given how she had the chance to a) kill Matoo and b) run after she killed her kid's kidnappers but didn't. She said to Sherlock that his opinion of her matters more than he could imagine, and I'm guessing she's really in love with him and hates him for that.
6
Reply
Flag
Wow, that's pretty deep. Seems like you've been thinking about this a lot. Your explanation might very well be the case, but at the same time the idea of Moriarty being in love with Sherlock unable to stop herself is a little disturbing. On the other hand, someone might say that it's a completely natural evolution of the traditional relationship between Sherlock and Moriarty. In the original stories Moriarty did certainly feel great admiration and respect for Sherlock, the only person who could match his intelligence. I guess it could even have been described as a kind of non-romantic love for Sherlock's mind, something that they are able to portray as real, romantic love in Elementary.
1
Reply
Flag
Terrific review! I find I agree with all you have written. One thing I was hoping for in the show was some look to pass between Joan and Moriarty as Moriarty is being trundled into the ambulance--some hint that Joan cannot be fooled and cannot to be manipulated just because Moriarty has a daughter and did not kill her captor. And the look would show that Moriarty knows Joan has her number.
6
Reply
Flag
Another thought what if the mentor Moriarty was mentioning is the Big Bad this season and it turns out that its Sherlock's father. :P
6
Reply
Flag
Or Moriarty's father who is the actual Moriarty.
Reply
Flag
I'd rather suspect Mycroft as the mentor. We know he's crooked, and in contact with somebody, I find it unlikely that he's reporting to their father
Reply
Flag
Natalie Dormer is the best Moriarty ever!! She portrays evilness, wickedness and cruelty yet you don't hate her. She's amazing. Robert Downey Jr. you need to hire her as a villain in the film series.
9
Reply
Flag
I want to declare this the best episode of Elementary the series ever so far ! I like this one so much I now feel a little justified sitting through some boring procedural episodes from last season.

Natalie Dormer did a fantastic job but perhaps it just shows you really need an interesting character to bring out the best acting in an actor.

I am glad Mattoo, he seems to be a very interesting character that can return sometime later in the series.

The only complaint I have was perhaps no one thought of it when the girl ask for mummy in the police station. Even then I immediately knew it was Dormer's daughter. Sherlock could be blind because of his love-hate for her but Joan or the others should have guessed by then.
8
Reply
Flag
I love your statement about the character and the actor. I strongly agree. What's the point of having these great words if you don't have the right person to deliver them. I love Elementary because its attention to detail is amazing. That makes for great entertainment and believabilty.
3
Reply
Flag
Glad they are keeping Moriarty around! Always been one of my favorite villains and Natalie Dormer is amazing!!!
2
Reply
Flag
Did anyone notice the odd blocking of the scene where Sherlock gets the newspapers? It felt a bit too random to just show him stepping outside to get them (instead of showing him reaching out the door from inside, or simply leaving the room and returning). "We created this back porch set and then wired and arranged the cameras and lighting for an insignificant two-second clip of Holmes picking up the papers." Not sure if it was meant as a red herring to make you think something/someone was out there, or if it will come up later.
4
Reply
Flag
An extremely well done episode, everyone involved surpassed themselves. I am still holding out hope that Irene is really Irene, and Moriarty is playing her (and Mycroft) as pawns. Mori + arty (death of art?) I cant reconcile with the amazing portrait of Joan, or any of the other canvases in the studio. Art looms large in Irene, and I for one dont see her as Moriarty in the long run. just a hopeful guess at this point. I think the portrait was paying homage to Joan in a twisted kind of way, making her a giant presence.
5
Reply
Flag
After the 'Previously on Elementary' bit about Moriarty, when I saw the little girls face and gigantic eyes I knew it was supposed to be Moriarty's Daughter, very good casting for a young Natalie Dormer.
3
Reply
Flag
I'm find this Moriarty likeable and more dangerous than the traditional version. She didn't run because she wants what she had as Irene. The moment with Holmes sitting in front of the fireplace I was given the impression that he doesn't know what to do with Moriarty and that has to scare the crap out of him.
12
Reply
Flag
Whatever Joan is looking for, I find it ironic that she is trying to force it in only one date with the people she is meeting.
2
Reply
Flag
I like the direction they took with Moriarty. My biggest complaint with the character up till now was that when she finally revealed herself she turned into a classic Bond villain. She played all the mustache-twirling villain tropes to a tee, and made the classic stupid mistake of going to Sherlock after she won to rub the victory in his face, getting caught in the process. My big response was "THAT'S the Big Bad of Season 1?" All the buildup of Moriarty's character is what saved the show from being a boring police procedural and "Sherlock's" inferior, but the payoff was just so disappointing and predictable.

That's not the case with this episode. Now being outed as a criminal, Moriarty seemed to take pleasure as being as Hannibal Lecter-ish as possible during most of the episode, even attacking her guard (which I saw coming a mile away. Thank you, preview spoilers) but to leave the guard ALIVE and busting loose to kill her daughter's kidnappers (a nice way to tie up one of the loose ends of season one with the Voice of Moriarty being one of the kidnappers) really threw me for a loop, and her conversation with Sherlock just before she turned herself in showed that she is evolving from her "Silver Age Villain" persona... and she doesn't understand it and hates it.

I love how the show has made both Sherlock and now Moriarty evolve from their season 1 selves and how their relationship is very difficult to define now. The "enemy I used to love" trope in season 1 has been done to death, but seeing Moriarty genuinely make an effort not to kill an innocent because she was afraid Sherlock would look down on her shows that the writers learned from their mistake and are now trying to put Moriarty into more of a gray area than just a clear black and white villain. The same can be said for Sherlock's brother Mycroft, who I am betting is going to be the Big Bad of season 2. However, Mycroft's relationship with Sherlock is almost the exact opposite with Moriarty, Sherlock started HATING him during his introductory episode but he has made a great effort to gain Sherlock's trust and now he and Sherlock are on "friendlyish" terms. Sherlock still doesn't fully trust Mycroft, so if he does in fact turn out to be a villain I don't think it will come to Holmes as a big of a shock as it did when Irene revealed herself to be the Big Bad.

One wish that I have for the season is to have Mycroft and Moriarty engage in some kind of duel. It would be great if Mycroft could frame Moriarty, forcing her to physically exchange blows with him and force Sherlock to choose between his seemingly innocent (but evil) brother or his evil (but innocent) former lover. And if Sherlock chooses Mycroft over Moriarty, that would be the ultimate victory over Holmes, especially if Mycroft doesn't make the decision of rubbing it in Sherlock's face and Sherlock discovers that he made the wrong decision by himself.
More+
3
Reply
Flag
Natalie Dormer is excellent as Moriarty. Something about the cultured British accent and the natural beauty on the outside and the psychosis and the evil on the inside. Also, she painted that flawless portrait of Joan Watson from memory! That's just freaking amazing!

So I guess I missed it but the Fuller girl is adopted?

As Noel alluded to in his review, characters like Moriarty and Mycroft are being introduced to enable Sherlock's growth. It can't be too far down the road that we'll meet his father. To make this point, the Sherlock we met in Season 1 would have thrown those letters in the fire without even thinking about it, destroying them for good. I'm sitting there saying to the TV, "Don't do it." The Sherlock we know now put them back in the beehive. I even said "attaboy" out loud when he did it.

Lucy Liu's performance in this series continues to amaze me. Moriarty mentions to Watson at the Fuller house that she underestimated her initially. She then goes on to say that Watson is much more clever than she thought, otherwise why would she be partners with Sherlock. This is the same type of things I have read about Lucy Liu in reviews of her work. The authors of the articles note they had no idea of her talent and acting range. Nice touch on the writers' part.

Elementary is a show that never disappoints me. I will look forward to future episodes with great anticipation.
More+
4
Reply
Flag
"THE ART OF SEDUCTION"
2
Reply
Flag
The episode was unique to be sure, a marked departure from the standard mystery formula. In many ways it felt like an episode of The Blacklist with Moriarty taking on a Reddington like role where you never quite know where her true motives lie and her ability to escape at any time but willing to get caught again.

Still, I enjoy how Moriarty interacts with Sherlock and how she throws everything just a bit off balance. She seems to cause Joan to doubt where she stands with Sherlock and whether he will one day grow tired of her. Even Sherlock admits that he is compromised when it comes to Moriarty. It seemed as if he was going to burn her letters at the end but he chose to return them to the bee hive as to show that he still holds out hope for her.

I thought for a moment there that Moriarty's Lieutenant was going to assume control of her empire and become the new Moriarty, making it more of a title than a name. Sad that they revealed him so soon and took him out just as quickly.

However, Moriarty spoke of a mentor, the one who schooled her in her devious ways. Perhaps this mentor will surface after he or she discovers that Moriarty has been captured and take on the role.
More+
2
Reply
Flag
Staff
The show's willingness to play with its mystery format -- Sherlock's testimony during the hearing in "Tremors" to the working backwards with "Ancient History" -- is certainly to be commended. Some procedurals wait too long to do that, so it's nice that Elementary wants to keep itself fresh.
5
Reply
Flag
Fresh format, true, but it needs some measure of expansion if it's going to maintain a villain background story arc aside from the case-of-the-week. Irene as Moriarty was already predictable enough, but to have her be the string-puller again is redundant for Holmes. (The old fool-me-once idea plays to both characters.) Granted, Moriarty was a constant in the Doyle stories, but he also wasn't captured within a few months of introducing him.

Granted, I'm not talking about a superhero-sized rogues' gallery, but this is a mystery show after all, and it's at its best when it showcases the hero's prowess in that capacity. (I mean, even Gregson and Bell could figure out that Moriarty is up to something by this point.) Sort of like how Arrow does much better when exploring Oliver's development as a hero more than spending time getting sudsy. Still, speaking of Arrow, aside from Quentin Lance on that show, Elementary does at least do a far better job with the addiction/recovery material (I'm looking at you, Laurel and Thea).
Reply
Flag
Natalie Dormer - Official Scene Stealer. No matter what she is in, when she is on screen everything and everyone else almost turn to grey. She's fantastic.
Some interesting theories below; I seriously doubt that Mycroft is the girls father but I like the idea of Moriarty having an evil brother. If Moriarty is reformed allowing Sherlock to have a true relationship then he's going to need someone equally as diabolical to take her place as the villain of this piece. I suppose an evil brother could fit the bill. Personally I hope she stays just on the wrong side of good, it makes her much more interesting and if she became a force for good she would be superfluous - we don't need two Sherlock's. I am wondering, however, if Sherlock's father could be the mentor she mention as she sat and bled whilst chatting to her soul mate? The Father is the only character yet to make an appearance and I don't doubt that he will be intellectually equal to his offspring.

Side note: that painting of Joan was awesome and probably quite a disturbing sight for the subject - can you imagine how you would react in Joan's position?
More+
8
Reply
Flag
Natalie Dormer is really good but for me the best Moriarty ever is Andrew Scott. He's brought real madness to the character.
2
Reply
Flag
I don't mean it as in others are not also good, but Natalie Dormer is just awesome.
4
Reply
Flag
Best Moriartyever!
6
Reply
Flag
Should "Irene" ever become redeemed, the original A.C. Doyle Moriarty had a brother (also named James) wonder if they could get away with this version having a far more sinister twin brother who could become the ultimate thorn in Sherlock's side...
2
Reply
Flag
Maybe I was overthinking things, but I was really hoping they were going to reveal that Moriarty had come up with an intricate communication system based entirely on what paint supply orders he had sent out for, but sadly, it was just a way for her to get spare glass in the event of shock treatment. M
Reply
Flag
I was glad to see a new episode. It has been a long dry spell. I really liked this episode and the exploration of the meaning of love. Moriarity's love for a daughter she hardly knows, Sherlock and Moriarity's love/hurt relationship, and Joan exploring relationships but finding none more rewarding than her friendship with Sherlock.

Moriarity choosing Joan as the subject for her portrait; sizing up her rival and planting seeds of doubt as to which of them would be able to hold Sherlock's interest longer. Joan pointed out she recognized the look on Moriarity's face when she heard her daughter's voice, It was the same look Moriarity gave her, one of pure hate.

Joan pointed out to Sherlock that the love of his life was Irene, but Irene did not exist, Irene is Moriarity and Sherlock tried to deny his feelings. He was angry when Moriarity came to the station and although he was able to figure out her true intentions, he still went to her and in their awkward way they both said that they still loved each other without really saying it.
Sherlock, reticent in the end sitting next to the letters from Moriarity.
More+
3
Reply
Flag
Sorry, Noel, I know your reply at the time was wishing otherwise, but I soooo called it last review ("Blood is Thicker"). Moriarty is back. And all of the other dominoes seem poised to fall as I predicted.

The only thing that didn't make me groan about it all (remember I said I didn't want to be correct) is Dormer and Miller's acting prowess. (Ok, that and entertaining a vague (and likely vain) hope that Lucy Liu will get the opportunity to forget the poise and education and just kick someone's posterior before all is said and done.)


Reply
Flag
Just had a thought: what if Mycroft is the girl's father?
10
Reply
Flag
That would be awesome!
Reply
Flag
That would be an interesting route, but I think when she said she'd have to teach the father a lesson in discretion, it sort of ruled him out to me. He's sneaky and a bit mysterious, but I don't think this Mycroft would ever put a child, his or not, into any possible danger.
4
Reply
Flag
Well, given the backloop into Moriadler-land, it's definitely possible that they will have written it this way.

1
Reply
Flag
Follow this Show
Members
12,337
  • 8:30 pm
    Judge Judy
    NEW
    CBS
  • 9:00 pm
    What Would You Do?
    NEW
    ABC
  • 10:00 pm
    ABC