Elementary

Season 2 Episode 14

Dead Clade Walking

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Full Episode: Dead Clade Walking

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Full Episode Summary

As Watson peruses one of Holme's cold cases, she figures out that a rare prehistoric fossil is tied to the unsolved murder. Sherlock is in uncharted territories as concerns his duties as a sobriety sponsor.

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Episode Discussion (8)
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For everybody who wants to get a closer understanding of Sherlock's state in this episode, read the Wikipedia articles about "Major Depressive Disorder" and " Major Depressive Episode" and then watch again. I think the writers and Jonny Lee Miller did an absolute impressive and accurate job.
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What the h...? Is Sherlock actually contemplating drilling a hole in his own skull to "release the evil humours"?
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Yes he is. A Major Depressive Episode includes irrational thinking.
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Anyone else notice the discrepancy in this episode?

In the second museum scene when Watson and Holmes corner Jerome Thomas to trick him into confessing, Watson surprises Thomas with the story of his role in the crimes. “You found out there was a fossil that could prove Dead Clade Walking, and you killed Doug Newberg to get your hands on it. You couldn’t find it, so you thought it was lost, until the Magpie put it up for sale again…”

Here, Watson assumes that Thomas is clueless about the reappearance of the fossil until the Magpie advertises it after the theft. But facts presented earlier in the episode indicate quite otherwise - actually Thomas is most likely the instigator of the fossil theft at the NYPD.

Recall the first museum scene. Watson and Holmes seek out Thomas for a professional opinion on their fossil. Thomas looks at the X-ray of the rock, tells them it is a rare, expensive infant tyrannosaurus and advises that the specimen likely belongs to Mongolia. Watson then leans over to Sherlock and says, in a volume clearly audible to Thomas, “The person who killed Doug Newberg ransacked his place. Maybe they were looking for that.”

So, Thomas now knows that the rock he had killed for years ago is in the possession of the NYPD. And he has just advised them it is Mongolian national property. Thomas knows from his years in the field how archeological treasures are handled and that the NYPD will be handing it over to the Customs Department based on his advice.

Isn’t the most likely explanation for the theft, then, that Thomas calls the Magpie, an illicit business contact, who has the resources needed to orchestrate the theft? The Magpie arranges the theft of the fossil from the NYPD. Then later when Thomas stops by to visit his partner in crime, he doesn’t leave before ensuring both the Magpie and the fossil are permanently silenced.

So are we to believe that Watson made a mistake in her assessment of Thomas’ role in the crimes, not realizing he assisted in the theft? Perhaps she forgot how much information she had voiced within earshot of Thomas. If this was the case, however, I assume Sherlock would have corrected her. Nothing gets by him.

So who made the oversight here? Watson and Sherlock both? Watson only, and Sherlock didn’t correct her? Or the writers?
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a lot going on here; more twists and turns than Lombard Street - Russian Hill - San Francisco.

dino bones, smugglers, thieves, smutty letters, gay Gay, 95 Theses, and we still haven't got close to the truth of the theft and cold case murder.
And the subplot of Sherlock's human side to boot. I guess the fact that there is nothing remarkable about Randy is the point of the whole recovering addict meme
Damn these writers are good.
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It's disconcerting to see that more and more time is being diverted away from the case files and toward the character of Randy and his struggles' meaning for the development of Sherlock.

Watching Sherlock's struggles with addiction and Irene's betrayal was gut wrenching, but watching him play nanny to Randy, who seems unable to decide whether he wants to get back together with his ex or wants to stay sober was anything but, bordering on the obnoxious and boring.

I think Sherlock put it best when he said: "If he (Randy) has cut me off, it will be a relief. Sponsorship is a risky investment of one's time and energy, quite frankly."
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I disagree about Randy. I really like this subplot, and I like the balance the writers have struck for it. He's entirely unexceptional. He's an addict. He's also Sherlock's only responsibility, and Sherlock's really peeved about it. He hates that he can't control his actions but that he still cares about them. You give that quote above, but you neglect to mention the context which entirely undermines his words. Sherlock is anxious that Randy hasn't called him, and that he's actually invested in the health of another with no possible benefit for him (besides soothing his ego about his competence as a sponsor) is a big and interesting step for him. Everything in Sherlock's life is on Sherlock's terms. This is different and I like it. It will be a useful litmus test to see whether Sherlock has changed much at all.
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I agree. It's not like Sherlock is tempted to go back to that life, which might add a bit of interest. It takes up too much time.
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