ER

Season 12 Episode 15

Darfur

1
Aired Thursday 10:00 PM Mar 02, 2006 on NBC
8.0
out of 10
User Rating
162 votes
14

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
ER revisits Dr. John Carter and reveals what he's been doing since his departure from County. Now in Darfur, Carter and colleague Dr. Dakarai work alongside relief workers to treat famine victims. Back in Chicago, Luka and Kerry differ over Clemente's next step, and Pratt and Neela treat a hit-and-run victim.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Poorly written and over-sensationalised

    4.0
    A return to Africa and a visit to our favourite ER doc in 'Darfur' is ruined by terrible writing. Noah Wyle's and viewers' time is wasted in a storyline that could easily be a cheap action movie. This episode does little to convince viewers of the real depravity in Darfur (apparently kids have access to pen and paper) and deprives us of catching up with Carter's life. How is his relationship? How is he really doing? The distracting scenes in Chicago are completely unrelated and make this episode a bit of a mess. It's a shame to waste Noah Wyle's return on this episode. It should have been saved to shine insight on the man himself - rather than dropping him into Darfur with an unconvincing tragic action story.moreless
  • What if a former favorite character came back and no one cared? We find out in this mostly stand-alone episode that wastes Noah Wyle's return.

    4.8
    The handful of "all-Africa" episodes, while "very special," have had the weakness of no Chicago-set action. This episode, featuring the return of Dr. Carter, actually made it worse by having about a third of the episode take place in Chicago. The end result is that having action set in Chicago only serves to highlight all the more how little we care what Carter's up to in Africa. We're not seeing him act and react with the rest of the cast, just dealing with things like intense poverty, civil unrest, and drought in Africa that most people have read about on CNN.com, and have already been touched upon in the other Africa-set episodes, to the point that it feels like most of the episode is a rerun.

    The end result is a waste of one of Noah Wyle's handful of appearances this year in a stand-alone storyline that advances no plot, or even reveals what is going on with his marriage. Even the expected good performance by Oz's Eamonn Walker does little to save the episode. Hopefully, we'll see Dr. Carter back in Chicago at some point this season, because otherwise it's just a waste of money, and the viewers' time, to bring him back.moreless
  • Noah Wyle is back and we see Carter in Africa.

    9.0
    Unlike everyone else whos written a review, I really liked this episode. Carter came back which was good enough and being back in Africa made the episode more than just the usual hospital stuff. The episodes in Africa (including the ones from previous seasons) i think are amazing. They really disturb me becasue of all the awful things which are going on. The way reactions to these things are acted and the fact that these things really do happen make it all the more powerful.

    I like Carter and i like the way hes acted by Noah Wyle. Ok so hes a bit of a gung-ho, act now,think later kinda guy but i love the way hes willing to risk his own life to save someone else and after his ridiculous departure im glad hes back(not the fact he left but the way he left. Walking round a corner? What is that?)moreless
  • Out of place in a season of perfection.

    6.5
    Carter in Africa: This is what really dragged the episode down. I wouldn't have minded if this episode had aired, let's say, in Season 9. However, this season has been consistent with fantastic episodes and this one felt quite out of place.



    I also find it very hard to believe that Carter didn't know what the sign of shaming is. The cheek of him asking "how was I supposed to know?" was quite alarming. He's been around Africa since last May, and seems to know all about the Jan Ja Wee yet can't seem to pick up on the sign of rape? I also thought he was incredibly stupid to go out of the camp and find the rape victim's husband, and also think it's stupid that he married Kem.



    I also thought the Darfur doctors were vaguely selfish. There goes Debbie complaining about how people are drinking sand while she shoves a bottle of Coke in a nurse's face.



    Clemente: I was quite glad that Jodie woke up in order to prevent Clemente's personal dilemna from dragging on, and also felt sorry for him amid everyone's suspicions of him. And Bobby really is a vile, creepy and nasty piece of work. It's easy to see that, amid all the naughty stuff of their relationship, Clemente and Jodie are two people who are hopelessly in love with each other and I think it's quite sweet.



    Neela/Pratt/Albright/Darnell: I hope this is the last we see of Darnell, this plotline has dragged in a bit. I hope this doesn't offend anyone, but I think the plotline has highlighted what black people think of the way they are treated, particularly those who are similar to Darnell. I also liked the way Pratt and KJ's "friendship" ended, and liked that KJ acknowledged the part that Pratt has tried to play in his life and help his father out, even if it has resulted in him doing the wrong thing.



    I think Neela's advice was well given, even after Pratt's behaviour in the trauma. And also: is it wrong to love Albright? Sure, she may be a bit of a cow but I'm all for some more surgery scenes and her rapport with Morris is hilarious and "out for herself" attitude is quite interesting.



    No Sam though, which is always a shamemoreless
  • Important things...

    8.3
    We have somehow split episode.. We have one major storyline concentrating on Carter and his doings on Darfur - the things are not good there and looks even more dangerous than Kongo and ofcourse.. Carter has to take things too seriously, again... and gets him and one other person there almost killed. But that's he.. and it is great to see him again...



    So.. on Chicago.. Pratt and his friend.. this time he hits a kid and Pratt makes him to turn himself in and has some doubts later... And Jodie wakes up.. and she can say that Clemente was right.. looking little brighter on that side...moreless
Goran Visnjic

Goran Visnjic

Dr. Luka Kovac

Laura Innes

Laura Innes

Dr. Kerry Weaver

Mekhi Phifer

Mekhi Phifer

Dr. Greg Pratt

Scott Grimes

Scott Grimes

Dr. Archie Morris

Maura Tierney

Maura Tierney

Dr. Abby Lockhart

Parminder Nagra

Parminder Nagra

Dr. Neela Rasgotra

Noah Wyle

Noah Wyle

Dr. John Carter

Guest Star

Ned Bellamy

Ned Bellamy

Detective

Guest Star

Juanita Jennings

Juanita Jennings

ICU Doctor

Guest Star

Mary McCormack

Mary McCormack

Debbie

Recurring Role

John Leguizamo

John Leguizamo

Dr. Victor Clemente

Recurring Role

Dahlia Salem

Dahlia Salem

Dr. Jessica Albright

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

    • Goof: In the scene where Carter and Dakarai are in the Jeep looking for the rape victim's husband and the police stop them, two camera angles are used, and a continuity error is revealed; all the shots from the camera filming behind Carter show him holding up his ID badge, but the shots from the camera shooting Carter's front show the same hand resting on the door of the Jeep.

  • QUOTES (6)

    • Clemente: So, what have you got for me?
      Kovac: Good to see you, Vic, but you're not on the schedule today.
      Clemente: Yeah, well, Weaver said I could come back.
      Kovac: I'm head of the ER, not Weaver, and I don't think you're ready.
      Clemente: So what are you doing, man? Giving me the slow walk to the door?
      Kovac: I'm looking out for you.
      Clemente: Well, I can take care of myself, thank you.
      Kovac: More importantly, I'm looking out for every patient in here.
      Clemente: Patients don't need to be protected from me.
      Chuny: (entering the room) Dr. Kovac, we've got a fourteen-year-old auto vs. peds coming in.
      Kovac: Go home, Vic.
      Clemente: I am home.
      Kovac: (following Chuny out) You're not working today!

    • (Kerry comes by and congratulates Abby on her pregnancy)
      Abby: Thank you. It was supposed to be a secret. (she glares at Morris)
      Morris: What?! Everybody was saying you were getting puffy. I had to defend you!
      Abby: (turning to Luka) Am I getting puffy?!
      Luka: You're not getting puffy!

    • (there's a gift basket on the Admit desk)
      Abby: Hey, what's this?
      Frank: Ah! That's for you and the little bastard.
      Abby: (with eyebrows raised) Thanks, Frank.

    • Carter: The Janjaweed have turned this place into the wild wild west.

    • Weaver: Dr. Clemente is an excellent physician with some personal issues. That's certainly nothing new around here.

    • (Luka and Abby in the ambulance bay, discussing baby names)
      Luka: How about Celine, or Jewel?
      Abby: Have you been going though your CD collection again?
      Luka: I love Jewel!
      Abby: Well, yeah, so do I, but not for a name. (pauses) How about Charo? (pauses again, then adds laughingly) Or Liberace?
      Luka: (gives Abby a dirty look) How about we give him the name of the first person who walks though the door?
      Abby: Seriously?
      Luka: Sure.
      Abby: Okay.
      (a moment later Clemente walks through the ambulance bay doors)
      Luka: Or, maybe not.

  • NOTES (3)

  • ALLUSIONS (3)

    • Luka: How about Celine? Or Jewel?
      Abby: Have you been going through your CD collection again?
      Luka's ideas for baby names are inspired by singers Celine Dion and Jewel Kilcher.

    • Dakarai: It does not matter whether it is Somalia, Rwanda, Darfur or New Orleans. When the faces are black, the world moves slow.
      The New Orleans part of this quote is a reference to the U.S. government's slow and disastrous response to the people of that city following Hurricane Katrina's devastating damage in 2005.

    • Carter: What happens in Darfur stays in Darfur.
      This is a twist on the catchy "What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas" phrase commonly associated with the phenomenally successful 2003 Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority ad slogan of "What happens here stays here."

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