Family Ties

Season 1 Episode 5

I Never Killed for My Father

3
Aired Unknown Nov 03, 1982 on NBC
8.4
out of 10
User Rating
26 votes

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Episode Summary

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Sensitive, liberal Steven and his macho, conservative father, Jake, clash during the Jake’s annual visit.

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Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (2)

    • The episode never discloses what Jake is dying of.

    • Steven and Jake disagreed over where the felt tip pen was invented. Jake said it was invented in Russia; Steven disagreed. Steven was correct. The felt tip pen was invented in 1953 by Sidney Rosenthal from Richmond Hill, New York.

  • QUOTES (3)

    • Steven: Uh, Dad, we're going to have to talk about this eventually, so I might as well bring it up now... about the... arrangements. I mean... what kind of funeral do you want-- Big? Small?
      Jake: I don't know. Surprise me.

    • Elyse: Jake, are you absolutely sure you're... going?
      Jake: Oh, yes. Yes, I'm sure.
      Elyse: Have you tried everything?
      Jake: No, I never tried white-water rafting. I'm going next month.

    • Steven: (trying to make conversation with his dad, takes out a random card, glances at it) You notice, gas stations don't give out free maps anymore.
      Jake: I don't need maps. I never get lost.
      Steven: (tears up the card)

  • NOTES (1)

  • ALLUSIONS (3)

    • In an Allusion within an Allusion, Steven assures Elyse that Jake will like light beer, for Bubba Smith and Dick Butkus like light beer. Bubba Smith and Dick Butkus co-starred in one of Miller Light's "less filling/tastes great" commercials, a series that Steven and Jake will parody a few moments later.

    • Steven and Jake do a two-round spoof on Miller Light's "less filling/tastes great" debate, a successful beer advertisement campaign from 1976-1978.

    • The title alludes to I Never Sang For My Father, a 1970 Gene Hackman/Melvyn Douglas movie.

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