Faraday and Company

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NBC (ended 1974)

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5.3
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User Rating
16 votes
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SHOW REVIEWS
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Faraday and Company

Show Summary

Dan Daily's previous series was "The Governor and J.J." with beautiful Julie Sommers. The executive producer of that show was Leonard Stern ("The Honeymooners"). Leonard Stern had a hit with "McMillian and Wife", and he hired Daily again for this 90-minute "mystery movie" series. Dan Daily had been in prison for twenty-eight years and he finally breaks out. He has to adjust to the changes in the world in the time he has been away. The great James Naugton played private eye Daily's by the book son and Sharon Gless was their secretary. A great premise and a great cast just didn't quite click. Perhaps a straighter, less humorous approach would have worked better. Maybe this premise should be dusted off and tried again. "Faraday and Company" alternated with "Banacek", "Tenafly" and "The Snoop Sisters" on the "Wednesday Mystery Movie". Four episodes were made.
Sharon Gless

Sharon Gless

Holly Barrett

Andrew Duggan

Andrew Duggan

Police Captain Brinkley

Geraldine Brooks

Geraldine Brooks

Louise "Lou" Carson

Dan Dailey

Dan Dailey

Frank Faraday

James Naughton

James Naughton

Steve Faraday

Wednesday
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Friday
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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • When revolution sweeps through a banana republic and democracy is established at last, an American private eye is found in jail, having spent 28 years there without trial. He returns home to an America which seems very different to him...moreless

    7.0
    American TV's famed ability to jump on cinematic bandwagons is much in evidence here. This short-lived series is based on the notion handled far more imaginatively in Robert Altman's film "The Long Goodbye", released the same year - an old-fashioned detective is a fish out of water in the harsh, glitzy world of modern Los Angeles. But where the film had a sleuth who is a contemporary figure who's just, by his own choice, out of the step with his environment, the TV series makes everything literal by having its hero a 1940s shamus who's been cut off from the world ever since 1945 and, on returning to California, expects it to be just the same as it was when he was young. This idea had some mileage - our hero is constantly bemused by things like television and women's liberation, and keeps getting modern slang wrong - but it ran out of steam pretty fast. And Dan Dailey is amazingly chipper for a guy who's done half his life in jail!moreless

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