Frontline/World

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Wednesday 8:00 PM on PBS Premiered May 23, 2002 In Season

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  • Ecuador: Flower Power

    Clip

    2/14/08

    Just miles from the equator, rose farms have become a colorful focal point of Ecuador's Andean countryside. With an elevation nearing 10,000 feet, the country's proximity to the sun and cool nights provide perfect growing conditions for long, straight roses. Ecuador's cut-flower industry supplies roughly one-third of America's roses, but the industry is notorious for dangerous pesticides, poor labor practices and corrupt management.moreless
  • Indonesia: Wham! Bam! Islam!

    Clip

    1/17/08

    Last season, FRONTLINE/World ran a story from the Middle East that introduced viewers to the fastest selling comic book in the Arab world, The 99. The comic features characters with super powers based on the concept of Allah's 99 attributes, including wisdom and generosity, as taught in the Koran. Its creator, Naif al-Mutawa, is a 36-year-old from Kuwait who was educated in the United States and who, as a boy, devoured Marvel comics and the Hardy Boys mysteries.moreless
  • Philippines: Have Degree, Will Travel

    Clip

    12/18/07

    I have heard this conversation among Filipinos in New York City over and over again. "You Filipino? Let me guess, you're a nurse?" "How did you know?" It seems like wherever I turn my head, I see Filipino nurses. This may be true in many cities across the United States. The Philippines has been exporting medical staff to the United States for the last half century, and Filipino nurses make up almost half of all foreign nurses in the U.S.moreless
  • Haiti: Belo's Song of Peace

    Clip

    12/13/07

    In this week's Rough Cut, reporter Natasha Del Toro takes a musical adventure to Haiti to cover a chaotic first-time music festival during rainy season in a country where nothing works.
  • Burma: State of Fear

    Segment

    10/31/07

    It's nighttime and FRONTLINE/World reporter Evan Williams is on a tense drive along the Thai/Burma border with members of the Karen National Union guerrilla army. The guerilla group has offered to take Williams into Burma, where they are working with a humanitarian group called the Free Burma Rangers to dispense aid. Several hundred thousand displaced people from Burma are hiding out in the jungle, driven from their villages by the country's brutal military regime. On foot, Williams travels under darkness to camps that have recently been attacked by government troops. The Karen foot soldiers know the territory well. Burma's military campaign against the Karen people has been going on for the past 50 years. The terrain is dangerous and heavily mined. The reporter is guided to the village of He Daw Kaw, where he meets Nah Pi. She used to be the village schoolteacher and tells Williams what happened to her home.moreless
  • China: Undermined

    Clip

    10/4/07

    More than in any other country, coal is the lifeblood of China's booming economy. Coal-fired power plants provide 70 percent of the country's electricity, and more than 30,000 mines operate throughout the country -- about 20 percent of which are illegal and, thus, unregulated. China is also the most dangerous place in the world to be a coal miner. On average, 13 people a day die in mine accidents there, and more than 80 percent of mining deaths worldwide happen in China.moreless
  • Congo: On the Trail of an AK-47

    Clip

    8/30/07

    This story began with a simple question posed to Peter Batchelor, the U.N.'s team leader for small arms and disarmament affairs, as we walked through the dim, subterranean corridors of the United Nations building in New York. I was attending a preparatory conference to curry international support for proposed legislation to curb illegal trafficking of small arms and light weapons -- a category comprised of everything from pistols to shoulder-fired rockets -- and Batchelor was frantically meeting with diplomats, peace activists and arms lobbyists. I had only a moment with him: "I'm looking to track a weapon," I said, "back from a conflict zone to the manufacturer. Where have simple guns like the AK-47 inflicted the most damage?" His answer was quick and unequivocal: Congo.moreless
  • Thailand: Women for Peace

    Clip

    8/9/07

    The conflict in Southern Thailand may be one of the least known in the world. But news of shootings and bombings by Muslim insurgents fighting government forces makes the headlines virtually every day here. For the last three years, Muslim militants have been fighting to create a separate state in the region and more than 2,000 people have been killed. At first, militants targeted police stations and army posts. But in more recent attacks, dozens of teachers have been killed and more than 100 schools burned. Insurgents have also killed Buddhist monks, and in some of the worst hit areas, the Thai government has been arming civilians for their own protection. I recently traveled to the south to find out what's being done to stop the violence. Unlike many conflicts, virtually all relief organizations have stayed away because of the risks. The Thai government has been battling the insurgents militarily but has offered little humanitarian aid to civilians. I met Soraya Jamjuree, a lecturer at Prince Songkhla University in the southern province of Pattani. She leads a team of Muslim university students, who travel to remote villages across the south to offer support to those caught up in the violence. Her group is called Friends of Victimized Families, and it receives support from the Canadian government. Many families she visits have lost husbands, brothers and sons to the violence, and it's the women and children left behind that Soraya's group tries to help.moreless
  • Philippines: The Black Stain of Oil

    Clip

    8/2/07

    I came to this remote area on the island of Guimaras quite by accident. As a reporter with the public radio program The World, one of my beats is to cover alternative energies, such as wind or biomass. Working for a news show that's international in scope, I'm curious about what solutions countries are adopting as the world starts to move slowly away from fossil fuels. Some work being done in the Philippines had caught my attention. Filipinos, I had learned, aren't using corn or sugarcane to power their cars; they're starting to use their local crop, the coconut. I contacted my friend Miles Tuason, a local writer in Manila whom I had met several years ago at a journalism conference in Tokyo. He returned my email, saying he assumed I'd be covering the spill and how tragic life had become on the islands of his childhood home. From the way he described the situation, I thought I had somehow missed a major international news story. In fact, I had no clue that in August 2006, an oil tanker chartered by Petron Corporation, the largest oil refiner in the Philippines, sank in the central Philippines, coating more than 200 miles of pristine coastline in a thick residue of bunker oil.moreless
  • Cambodia: The Silk Grandmothers

    Clip

    6/28/07

    Growing up in Tokyo, Cambodia was never far from my conscience. At train stations, volunteers would ask commuters to empty their change to help one of the poorest countries in Asia. Public-service announcements on television encouraged donations and showed the wide eyes and gaunt faces of Cambodian children. Whenever I left food on my plate at the table, my mother would say, "Think about all of the hungry children in the world!" Still, I was surprised when I read about Kikuo Morimoto, a well-known textile craftsman from Kyoto, Japan, who had moved to Cambodia to help revive the country's ancient practice of silk-making. Many Japanese people are well intentioned but feel more comfortable staying on the entrenched road before them than taking a different, sometimes extraordinary, path. There is even an old saying in Japan that says, "A nail that sticks out will be hammered down."moreless
  • Indonesia: After the Wave

    Segment

    6/26/07

    FRONTLINE/World correspondent Orlando de Guzman returns to Aceh, where he had first covered the war, to explore the prospects for continued peace. De Guzman begins by revisiting the village of Matamamplam, where in 2003 he filed a groundbreaking BBC radio report that implicated the Indonesian military in the execution of seven young men and boys. De Guzman meets with victims' families and human rights workers now calling for justice, and he confronts the Indonesian general who was in charge of the province when the murders took place. "Everyone violated the human rights law," the general tells de Guzman. "It wasn't only Indonesia's armed forces, the cops, the government, but the GAMs also violated the human rights law... Do we want to keep talking about that? If we want to have peace, we have to bury everything." De Guzman also meets Aceh's new governor, Irwandi Yusuf, a former rebel leader who escaped from jail during the tsunami and now faces the task of redressing past grievances, without provoking the Indonesian army.moreless
  • Tanzania: Hero Rats

    Clip

    6/26/07

    For the past seven years, Bart Weetjens has been running a unique lab in Tanzania, where he trains rats to sniff out deadly unexploded land mines -- the legacy of countless bloody conflicts. Although dogs have traditionally been used to help humans detect mines, Weetjens realized that rats are lighter, cheaper to maintain and less susceptible to tropical disease. "I've always felt a very strong bonding with rodents," he says. In Hero Rats, FRONTLINE/World reporter Alexis Bloom accompanies Weetjens to work in Mozambique to watch his trained rodents in action. She also visits a school there that was cleared of land mines with the help of the rats, allowing the children to resume their education and play without fear of stepping on a mine. "They save human lives," Weetjens says of the rats, "and, yes, they are heroes, actually."moreless
  • Kuwait: The 99

    Clip

    6/26/07

    FRONTLINE/World reporter Isaac Solotaroff follows al-Mutawa as he runs his publishing enterprise in Kuwait and markets his comics throughout the Middle East, hoping to spread a moderate, modern image of Islam.
  • India: A New Life

    Segment

    6/21/07

    Father Koshy's work with street children began in 1989, when Vijayawada's mayor asked him to start a homeless shelter. Vijayawada sits about 190 miles from the booming high-tech center of Hyderabad and has a population of close to 1 million. As is the case in many Indian cities, large numbers of destitute adults and children live on the streets. Using money raised from foreign donors and support from the Indian government, Father Koshy, a Catholic Salesian priest, teamed up with his old friend Anu Dasaka, a psychologist and high-caste Hindu, to start the New Life Children's Home (or Navajeevan Bala Bhavan). Father Koshy believes that the enormous social divide between the poor and the prosperous in India is growing wider. "There are people who have become very rich with the advancement of information technology and computers," Koshy says, "but there are also a lot of people who are becoming more and more marginalized." As people from the countryside continue to flood into urban centers looking for work, urban slums, he says, will proliferate, "and that is going to affect the children." He estimates that there are about 3,000 children now living on the streets of Vijayawada.moreless
  • Uganda: The Condom Controversy

    Clip

    6/13/07

    "You must learn how to say no," booms Ugandan evangelical minister Martin Ssempa. "Say 'I do not want to have sex. I have chosen not to have sex.'" So begins this week's Rough Cut, which looks at the controversy over U.S. funding for AIDS relief in Africa. We meet Ssempa, preaching to a classroom of students in Uganda's capital, Kampala. He's among a growing number of voices in the country who are teaching an abstinence-only approach to combat the spread of HIV. It's a message with roots in the United States, where abstinence-before-marriage campaigns surfaced in the early 1980s, mainly among Christian evangelical groups. The issue became more politicized in 2003, when President Bush pledged $15 billion to fight the global spread of AIDS, the biggest single contribution from any nation.moreless
  • South Korea: Everyone's A Journalist

    Segment

    3/27/07

    I began my career as a newspaper reporter in the late 1990s, just as the Web began to take off. As a staff writer for the San Francisco Chronicle, I use the Internet all the time to dig up documents and track down people. It allows me to do my job better and faster. But the Web has also forced the media industry to scramble. More and more readers expect to read the news online for free, and the proliferation of bloggers has made content cheap to come by and to create. Every day, I hear bad news about the decline in newspaper readership, about a public loss of faith in the media, about mergers and layoffs. In 2005, I wrote my first report about OhmyNews, a South Korean online news site founded on the premise that every citizen is a reporter. To get a closer look at the Asian media phenomenon, FRONTLINE/World sent me to the ultra-wired metropolis of Seoul, South Korea, to report on OhmyNews and explore whether such a model could be replicated here in the United States. In the report, you will meet some of the site's most popular "citizen" reporters (more than 40,000 citizen journalists contribute to the site) and its founder, Mr. Oh; you will also see how the site morphed from the voice of a political movement in the 2002 elections into a vibrant news hub publishing hundreds of articles and attracting 2 million pageviews a day. When reformer Roh Moo Hyun won a tight presidential race in 2002, he granted his first domestic interview to OhmyNews, whose citizen journalists helped bring him into office. It's also a personal journey for me, to see where my future as a journalist lies. --Vanessa Huamoreless
  • Cambodia: Care and Comfort

    Clip

    11/20/07

    Genocide trials have begun in Cambodia for the surviving leaders and officials of the Khmer Rouge's reign of terror in the 1970s. The "killing fields" of that era are what Cambodia is most known for internationally. But for years, the country has quietly held another frightening distinction: The nation with the highest AIDS rate in Asia.moreless
  • Uganda: A Little Goes a Long Way

    Segment

    10/31/06

    Microcredit is not new. It's been around in one form or another for hundreds of years. But in the Information Age, a San Francisco company has taken the idea of microfinance and upgraded it for the Web. Radio reporter Clark Boyd first reported about Kiva.org for Public Radio International's news program The World. He now travels to Uganda for FRONTLINE/World, where the first recipients of money collected through Kiva's Web site are building and expanding businesses.moreless
  • Burma: State of Fear

    Segment

    10/31/06

    FRONTLINE/World reporter Evan Williams travels undercover to Burma (also known as Myanmar) to expose the violence and repression carried out by Burma's government against its own people.
  • South Africa: The Play Pump

    Clip

    10/24/05

    Editors' Note: Some stories just grow and grow. We first launched our video story about social entrepreneur Trevor Field and his PlayPump water project in South Africa on the Web back in October 2005. With an overwhelming interest from Web viewers, we decided to show the story on TV in May of last year. Since then, much has happened to Field and his efforts to bring fresh drinking water to millions of Africans. On January 30, 2007, we broadcast an update of Field's progress. Last autumn, PlayPumps International, the non-profit he cofounded, received a huge financial boost, when First Lady Laura Bush and former president Bill Clinton announced $16.4 million in grants from the U.S. government, The Case Foundation, and the MCJ Foundation to help Field expand his work. Hip-Hop artist Jay-Z has also lent support through his "Water for Life" concert tour. The Case Foundation is continuing to work with Field, with the goal of raising a further $45 million by 2010 to help 10 million Africans gain access to clean drinking water. Our video update of the announcement in New York and Field's reaction to the news will be posted January 31st.moreless
  • The Man Who Knew

    Segment

    10/3/02

    John O'Neill, the FBI's expert on Al Qaeda warned of its threat. But his maverick style doomed his career.
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