A Full House Community
ABC (ended 1995)


This morning, a friend of mine alerted me to a news story going around that claimed ABC was interested in making a Full House reboot. After banging my head on my bathtub, Kyle Spencer style, for 10 minutes, I put on my investigative attire (which looks a lot like my regular attire, but is totally different), and, well, I investigated. 

The original article—which appeared today on Entertainment Tonight's website—is no longer online, and the syndicated version (on Yahoo!) has also been pulled. Meanwhile, the Today show reports that the source of this morning's hullabaloo was a post on a blog called Disney Treasures, which itself was an exact copy of an April Fools joke that Screenrant published seven months ago. Whether or not the story is true or false isn't really the issue here, though (but again, for the record: It's false). The issue is that Hollywood has run out of ideas, and that a Full House remake is not only entirely plausible, but it's actually probably something that someone somewhere has pitched. 

Let's take a look at what's on tap, shall we? Disney's got Girl Meets World, a spin-off or extension of the popular '90s series Boy Meets World, on the horizon, NBC is attempting to bring Murder, She Wrote back to life, and CBS is mulling over the idea of rebooting Charmed. Yes, we've reached the point in time where people are waxing nostalgic for the good old days of the 1990s, and I for one think that's a crappy idea. The '90s were a good decade for TV, sure... when you're not comparing them to anything that premiered after 2000. In the '90s, TV was full of wholesome shows, family shows, shows that left you feeling warm and fuzzy inside as the credits rolled and the blooper tags began. But we've evolved since then. Many viewers no longer want to learn a life lesson every week. We want thought-provoking, edge-of-our-seats drama. We want exciting. We want television that's new and bold and frankly, that's not at all what we'll be getting if some of the projects that are currently in development make it to air.


At San Diego Comic-Con this past July, I sat in on Joss Whedon's solo panel. He does one every year, and it usually ends up being one big, funny Q&A session. But Whedon didn't earn his status as the king of Comic-Con by being self-deprecating and funny. He did it by spearheading several of the most innovative TV series of the last 10 to 15 years. And he's been known to let a nugget of truth slip out between all the jokes. And during this particular Comic-Con session, he said something that jumps to the forefront of my mind every time a new remake is announced. When asked why the Dr. Horrible sequel had been pushed back yet again, Whedon explained that he wanted to create something new more than he wanted to revisit his past, which is why he jumped at the chance to make Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. rather than finish the long-awaited sequel. He also stated that he believed we needed to be creating new content, and that remakes are no longer about nostalgia. That's never been more clear than it is right now. 

The rash of recent remake announcements has nothing to do with missing certain shows, or yearning for the way they used to make us feel. They aren't in development because they have something new to add to popular culture. More often than not, they resemble the skeletal remains of once-beloved TV heroes. They're shadows of the great things they once were. They're last-ditch efforts from networks that are grasping at straws to remain relevant in a world where new, inventive ideas are becoming an endangered species. The Charmed reboot that CBS has ordered a pilot script for? That series only went off the air in 2006. That's only seven years ago. I have clothing that's older than that.


Last week, movie-review site The Dissolve declared 2017 the year of new ideas with regard to the film industry. Writer Keith Phipps called a moratorium on the remakes and sequels and literary adaptations that've already been done a million times, and argued that in 2017, Hollywood should be forced should to start over. And now I'd like to do something similar for television, whether or not that rumor of a Full House reboot is real. Yes, we've had our own fun lately with the onslaught of news about remakes, reboots, and re-imaginings coming from the TV networks, but the time has come to put an end to that once and for all.

In an ideal world, with the end of the year quickly approaching, I'd declare 2014 to be the year of new ideas for TV. But there are already several deals in place for the 2014 season, not to mention Fox's 24: Live Another Day and FX's Fargo to look forward to. But also in an ideal world, the remakes and reboots and re-imaginings we've learned of thus far will never make it past the pilot process. Given the current state of network television, that's not so likely to happen. So here's what I'm proposing: 2015 is our year, 2015 is the year we shelve the old and look toward the future. And here's how we do it...


No more reboots or remakes. 

Let's leave the past in the past. Charmed was fun for awhile, until it wasn't. And it probably only lived as long as it did because The WB didn't have much else to depend on at the time. The Bridge was an Americanized tale of a Danish series, but it never became the must-watch series FX was hoping it'd be, Season 2 renewal notwithstanding. And on that same note, why must Americans remake everything of quality from other countries? Why can't we praise the original series without also tarnishing it by adding our own flair? Sundance is currently airing the haunting original French series The Returned, but A&E is remaking it. BBC America just finished airing the U.K.'s Broadchurch, but Fox is remaking it—and with the same lead actor, to boot. Why? Because we're greedy.


No more adaptations—or at least no more multiple adaptations of the same work. 

There are currently two Sherlock Holmes series on TV. AMC's biggest series, The Walking Dead, is an adaptation of a graphic novel, and the network is already planning a "companion piece" spin-off. ABC Family and The CW both have popular shows based on popular book series, Pretty Little Liars and The Vampire Diaries, and they've both launched spin-offs this season. And there are, what, five Wizard of Oz adaptations in the works right now? It's hard to get excited about any of the Oz ideas, when every other week, someone's waving a new Dorothy idea in your face. L. Frank Baum's story and its characters have been in the public domain since 1956, so why are these adaptations only coming alive now? Doesn't matter. Let's stop doing the same things over and over again. 


No more spin-offs. 

I know i just wrote an article about current TV characters who could carry their own spin-offs, but the truth of the matter is that we should put a stop to spin-offs, too. Can't we think of anything better than what's already out there?


No more re-imaginings. 

When Ronald D. Moore and David Eick redeveloped the kitschy old Battlestar Galactica for a new generation in 2003, it worked because they were able to set the series against a contemporary backdrop. They were able to frame the series in such a way that it was an allegory for a post-9/11 world. The new series was more serious and less campy than the original. It jump-started serious discussions, and it was thought provoking. But that was a case of being in the right place at the right time. The series lost its way toward the end, but it succeeded because it was on Syfy and because no one else was doing anything like it. That's not the case anymore.


No more TV series as movies. 

This seems a bit hypocritical coming from someone who shelled out a big wad o' cash for the Veronica Mars movie Kickstarter who is utterly excited to see the finished product, but that, I believe, is a situation that will never happen again. It was a new endeavor, the first of its kind, and it was clearly a labor of love for everyone involved. I don't support the idea that all failed TV shows, or that any TV show, for that matter, can live on as films. I think we should be happy with what we had and call it a day. TV shows will always be canceled before their time, and many of them will never receive a proper ending. Hell, even when they do, we still don't ever seem to be satisfied. And yes, that was a dig at everyone who's still clamoring for a Friday Night Lights movie, or more Breaking Bad episodes. Friday Night Lights ended as perfectly as it could have, so why do we need more? Let's just put an end to this and ensure that we'll never have to sit through another Sex and the City movie by just saying no to all TV-shows-turned-major-motion-pictures.


If we can abide by these rules, I think we'll be in better shape in the end. It might get worse before it gets better, but if we quit the remakes, reboots, and re-imaginings cold turkey, we should be through the withdrawal and the night sweats come 2015. Part of the reason the networks are performing so poorly lately is that they're recycling storylines that maybe weren't so great in the first place. Which leads to early cancellations, and then suddenly everyone's wondering what went wrong. It's obvious what went wrong: the art and medium of television has evolved. What worked a decade ago, or two decades ago, doesn't work anymore. The only way to make it through this is to start over fresh. Who's with me?


Previously Aired Episode

AIRED ON 5/9/1997

Season 8 : Episode 25

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As much as i loved Battlestar Galactica, i agree with you on most everything. No more reboots and reimaginings. Spinoffs sometimes work, look at Star Trek: Deep Space 9; and i have high hopes for The Walking Dead companion, The Flash, and Agent Carter. But i disagree with you on book adaptions. Some of the best series of all time, have come from book adaptions. It's a vast wealth of untapped potential. As for originality, everything has been done. Everything now done, will be a twist on something that's been done before. "There is nothing new under the sun, except someone new."
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Oh, one more factor is that between all the cable networks (including many beginning to dabble in fiction that were normally reality or movie-based) and now entities like Netflix and Amazon producing their own content, there's a huge demand for new creative fare. On the other hand you also have dedicated teams of writers today rather than episodes written by freelance writers. That's a big demand to secure writing talent and content and it's no wonder content producers are looking at recycling properties.

And to be fair - old game designers have been porting their adventure games and similar fare into phone/tablet apps and giving their old games new life. Heck, even game BOOKs like the Fighting Fantasy line are being turned into apps. Authors have also gotten the rights to their old back catalogs and are reissuing them all as ebooks. One prolific author whose website I read is claiming that he's making more from cheap ebook sales of his old fiction series than he made when they were first printed thanks to original publishing deals which often leave authors with mere pennies per copy! He's got a whole set of articles up specifically focused on helping authors of 90s and earlier books repackage them as ebooks for a new generation of readers, market them, etc.

So I'd say content creators of all types have no problem revisiting, reinventing (and sometimes rehashing) old creative content in new mediums or new styles, turning them into apps or board games or comics, republishing, etc. TV shows are becoming comics, comics are becoming TV shows and movies, everything's becoming an app... as long as the content is good, I'm ok with that. Actually, I can think of a lot of my childhood faves from the 80s that I'd like to see reimagined for a contemporary audience - heck, in many ways Star Wars already has been for a new generation (and much more soon).
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I believe Hollywood is doing all of these reboots etc. for one main reason, and it's not a lack of ideas, attempting to remain relevant (???), etc. It's about... money. The level of quality demanded from American viewers today is very high and that makes television production very expensive. A Reboot, spin-off or adaptation involves a product that's a known quantity - it's already succeeded in one format. In studios' minds, that means less financial risk. It's really that simple.


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I hate Full House.
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I thought I was the only one!Don't get me wrong, I loved The Office, but we do need to stop with the remakes. Every single time a remake is announced I think of a line from Gilmore Girls where they say, "But this is America, where we bastardize everything."

Seriously. We remade the absolutely BRILLIANT Death at a Funeral for NO reason. The British film was wonderful and didn't need to be remade! Coupling is STILL one of my favorite comedies because it was just SO good, but they tried to re-make that years and years ago.

Bunheads, one of the greatest original shows to make it to air was cancelled in favor of a Pretty Little Liars spinoff. Ugh. This drives me nutty.
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"We want thought-provoking, edge-of-our-seats drama. We want exciting. We want television that's new and bold and frankly, that's not at all what we'll be getting if some of the projects that are currently in development make it to air."
The only problem is, that this is not the taste of people keeping alive shit like vampire , supernatural, or any other cliché-garbage.
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this is a very good article of current interest. thank you.
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Even the 80's was a wonderful decade for television as well, thank god I Agree with this article, leave the originals alone.
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We need a Reboot reboot.
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A full house making is interested the orignal was so cheesy it would be interesting to see some real life issues and real people instead of the cardboard cut outs in the original
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Charmed? Boy Meets world? Are you kidding? Everything about this article screams "barely relevant to your interests one way or the other". I mean, as a white male in his late 20's, I hardly feel this supposed burn out on reboots because frankly, anything they've rebooted or plan to reboot are all tween girl shows it feels like (yes I understand Boy Meets World wasn't per se, but might as well have been). I guess the Full House news today intriuged me a little?

Anyway, since you brought up Whedon, Firefly is really the only thing that should be having reboot talks (oh wait, he doesn't want to revisit his past, oh well). But otherwise, meh, until they start rebooting a wide range of things, I hardly see it s a problem. Not my problem (or anyone's problem with taste) anyway.
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Oh man, Firefly should NEVER be redone. It's like taking the Buffy TV show and ending up with the original movie! FOX executives aren't total morons or FOX would be off the air, but clearly they smoke crack during certain meetings. Joss Whedon got his perfection and it was snuffed out.
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"FOX executives aren't total morons or FOX would be off the air"

That's all relative. FOX would strike me as too big to fail at this point, and they do actually sign up shows that ARE good that they DONT cancel. However, Fox, perhaps moreso than any other network* seems known for cancelling bonafide great shows after giving them an initial shot. In fact, it almost seem bad for a good show to be considered by a network like Fox because it could just doom it shortly after it helps it. And that being totally twerked has little to do in the end with whether Fox "stays on the air", because it will always stay afloat due to Orielly/Hannity fanatics as well as people watching Cops reruns :P .
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Oh the * was to indicate NBC may have overtaken them on that metric, except that NBC probably doesn't acquire and then cancel quite as many "good" shows these days :P .
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Fun fact about Whedon though: at that same panel, he did mention that he's always thinking of ideas about how he can expand the Firefly universe. If only there were more hours in the day...
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My pet peeve is back-door pilots. The idea appears to be that I would enjoy "The Finder" more, if it's pilot was stuck inside "Bones." I should be especially excited if Booth and Brennan spend 3 whole minutes discussing how they know the characters from The Finder. Seriously?
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Well, I never saw one episode of JAG, but I've been in love with NCIS for 11 years and counting... which then did a backdoor pilot into NCIS: LA, which I liked because it balanced the time with the original show. I don't watch the spin-off, but damn if it doesn't do well for itself. I can't think of any other show I enjoy that has tried that.

I don't count Buffy and Angel because that's purely a spin-off.

And Supernatural can't even call what it did a backdoor pilot. It just replaced one of its episodes with some other show that had no relation to it in concept, tone, acting ability, mythology, characters... It was a pilot with guest stars acting out of character!

What did I miss? I see "The Finder" above.
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The Latinos are remaking Breaking Bad with there own shitty soapbox actors! Why? Why not just dub it or hell learn to read subs?! They want to remake something that was "perfect" only to #$$%% all over it in place of write something new. :(
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There are exceptions but yes generally remakes, reboots and spinoffs are generally bad and are just playing on the popularity of their source material. There is a lot of great TV being produced today but it is surrounded by mountains of crap The best TV in recient years in on cable. Problem is networks tend to be conservative and their programs have to fit a certain set of standards so for them I imagine its easier to sell an idea for a show that is already farmilar to the 'money people' rather than a new idea. Also thats the reason why certain production companies constantly make and shop around pilots because once they break into the network TV business and produce something that meets the status quo it becomes easier to sell other shows.
I wish the rules would lighten up and give the networks the same kind of creative freedom cable has. The reason for those restrictions has long since disappeared because if I know for a fact that millions of underaged viewers watch Breaking Bad, Game of Thrones and Dexter just to name a few. The execuse that the restrictions on the networks are to protect the children is a simply not true anymore. Media(TV shows, movies, books, video games) is very easy for children to get and watch/use through both legal and illegal means.
The truth is the quality of TV has stagnated and while as I said there is quality stuff out there you do have to look for it because there is a whole lot of junk as well.
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For the most part I think that remakes, reimaginings & adaptaions tend to be weak. I don't think the networks are doing them because of a lack of ideas, I think the issue is with the networks wanting a built audience or at the very least a built in sampling. The problem is if the show sucks it sucks. I think it is worthwhile to do a remake if there is creative juice and a way to make it current. Battlestar Galactica worked because it was not only different from the orginal but it was made relevent with creative characters and thought provoking plots. Bionic Woman was brought back with none of these and it failed. The networks need to look closer at what they are doing and not just saying "hey everyone knows that character lets bring them back" and ask themselves does this work in the current landscape of the audience..
Admittedly there are many more bad than good but ruling out adaptations would leave us without a bold new vision of Sherlock Holmes. A lack of adaptations would also leave us without Buffy, so I think there is a place for adaptations from other media (film, litterature, comics, etc) are fine but must also adhere to the creative juice and being current rules.
On the subject of reunions and continuations, things are much worse. I actually cannot think of a successful reunion/continuation show. This has been attempted since the 80s with escentially no success. Networks need to learn that a ratings victory for a reunion/continuation movie does not mean a successful restart, case in point Knight Rider. The TV movie did very well ratings wise but flopped as a series. There will always be a tinge of nostalgia for old show but usually a two hour movie will quench that just fine.
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Let the zombies of "The Walking Dead" rise up and start chowing on some producers' heads if someone tries to bring back "Full House." Haven't we all suffered enough!?! The thought of Bob Saget with white powder in his hair playing "Grandpa" to a house full of insufferable tykes is horrifying!
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Hear hear! Completely agree
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Wait you're actually expecting television script writers to come up with original stuff? What with all this low hanging fruit they have available? Of course they'll take the path of least resistance and do a reboot of a popular show. It's guaranteed to suck but who cares, someone willl make some money. If anyone brings up the idea of re-doing Full House, please have them shot immediately. I'm anxiously awaiting some of these rehashes just to see how quickly they get cancelled. Hollywood never learns.
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I'm with you. I would love to see more scifi on tv.
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"The Charmed reboot that CBS has ordered a pilot script for? That series only went off the air in 2006. That's only seven years ago".

Thank you! It's not just CBS but also many people don't find this strange.
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While I like your ideas and approve, Hollywood has very few original ideas anymore and to be honest, while I love dramas to an extent, I want some original actions shows like I watched as a kid. I also want comedies that do not make either the female lead or the male lead look like they are stupider than dirt. There is such a thing as intelligent comedy and I think it is time someone really worked on that. And I do like shows like NCIS and CSI and they have been on forever, but unless it offers something new, I do not bother much with procedurals anymore. Elementary and POI are taking a different and unique approach to the subject and throw in enough curve balls to keep it very good. And yes they are coming up with some ideas, Orange is the new Black, American Horror Story and that is just naming a couple, but I do not just want more Breaking Bads, I want original ideas that are along the line of ATeam, without rebooting it. I would also love to come along with a great space/scifi show that is similar to star trek, without being yet another star trek or Stargate, but not like Universe, something fun and action without drowning us in drama. I still miss Leverage, and while they ended that as good as they could, it seemed too soon.

As i final note, original ideas are not easy to come by, and even with the good shows, i can find something similar in some ways, because the truth is, original ideas really do not exist anymore, instead you have to go with original ways of telling the story. Everything has been done, and in so many different ways. I tell you this from experience, I write novels and original ideas are hard to come by, but original twists and telling of a story do exist.

Let us hope I am at least partially wrong, and someone really does come up with a true original idea never told before in any way, but that is probably asking too much.
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Since when do we see Sitcoms getting remake/reboot off of original show programming?
All we see with Sitcoms getting spin-offs after they've ended... They're nothing like compare to Drama Series being remade/reboot after they've end... Because I think Drama series are more at basic earlier to be rebooted or remade than Sitcoms are... So they just leave sitcoms original show programming alone, and just do spin-offs off of them... And nobody really wants to see the same stage acts of comedy or performance done twice with the same title name...
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What we really need right now is a new Stargate series on the air or at least a movie to wrap up the loose ends of all three shows.

I also miss Torchwood and Sarah Jane Adventures, they were great spinoffs that brought the whoniverse to all audiences in a way DW cant. SJA bridged the gap between kids and the main show, Torchwood was adult and more dramatic than DW and was geared towards people who found Doctor Who too kiddy.

In the end there are some things that should stay dead but Stargate and Doctor Who are two things I support getting spinoffs of because they have so much that could be done within those giant established universes.
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"...people who found Doctor Who too kiddy."

Erm... Doctor Who is for kids: it was created for kids and it has always been for kids...
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I agree with you to a point. My main issue is the sheer number of them right now. It seems like in the past few seasons, we've had more reboots and adaptations than ever before.

I don't think we can completely close the door on spinoffs, reboots, and adaptations, but they need to be chosen more carefully and done less often. I ended up loving Angel more than Buffy. But it was the right character at the right moment in time. And it had its own tone and themes that were completely separate from what Buffy brought to the table. I love what shows like Grimm and Once Upon a Time bring to the table because they take these things we know and turn them upside down or put a different spin on them and it works. Hannibal works because it pushes the envelope but it also chose to operate in a time that wasn't really filled in with the books and movies that preceded it, so there's a little freedom there.

That being said, we don't need to give every show that's ended a reboot a few years down the line, or adapt any foreign show that had any success, or give a show a spin-off just because you want to cash in more on the success of the original.

I get the wanting to work the nostalgia angle. It's why I watch The 90s Are All That block and the shows from my childhood in syndication and why I'll check out Girl Meets World when it premieres. But it doesn't mean that I want every show from my youth to get a reboot. Those shows were great for the era that they were in. If we try and reboot them all now, it has the potential to tarnish the memory of the original and I don't want that.
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I agree wholeheartedly. Although if it were my list, I'd add no more police/detective/CSI/FBi procedurals ;-)
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I'm OK with the two adaptations of Sherlock Holmes at the moment. They're different enough in practice that you can like both. But let's let it stop there.

Meanwhile, SO many detective shows are just variations of the old Sherlock Holmes character. Main character a detective with weird quirks that rubs everyone the wrong way, and the only one that can tolerate him is his partner. Monk, old Law & Order CI, Mentalist, and (in a weird way) Psych, etc.

As for spin-offs, I'm OK with the basic concept but it's used too often. Frasier and NCIS are good examples of solid spin-offs. There are plenty of bad ones.
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But if there's something I totally agree with you is the wrongness there is in thinking that there needs to be an american version of every successful TV show around the world such as The Office, Ugly Betty, The Bridge, and the list goes on and on and on.
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I'm with you! (Sort Of)

I, for example, am one of the supporters of the Boy Meets World Spin off, I'd loveto see Cory, Shawn, and Topanga all grown up. I'm glad that Arrested Development is back. I'd love to see a Friends movie. I enjoyed the whole first season of 90210. And I'm still waiting for someone to start producing all new episodes of The Muppet Show all over again.

On the other side, I see the new Charlie's Angels show was a failure. I never even intended to watch Jerry O'Conell and Portia de Rossi as Herman and Lily Munster. I don't think there is anyone in the whole wide world that enjoyed watching Joey by himself far away from central perk.

Here's the thing: There are things that work and things that don't. I for example think that afeter watching Drew, Cameron and Lucy as the angels, I don't see why not continue with a legacy of action films and go back to the Tv show. I wouldn't watch a single episode of a new Charmed, and trash the whole thing via social networks to make less people watch it and get it cancelled ASAP. I don't think I would like to see Josh Radnor or Zach Braff take the role of Danny Tannner. Never in my life would I support someone else trying to impersonate Rachel Green, Michael Scott, or Gabrielle Solis. Although the only way we may ever find out if something works or not is giving it a try (but I do agree there are some things that are obvious mistakes)

Wouldn't you think that if 20 years from now a young actress who's probably still wearing diapers at this time became Buffy and our kids got to see that would be amazing?
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"And on that same note, why must Americans remake everything of quality from other countries? Why can't we praise the original series without also tarnishing it by adding our own flair?"

In America's defense, numerous very successful sitcoms in the 1970s were remakes of British shows. And we had a good thing going when we decided to remake Pop Idol and The Office.
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Ok, the above can be resumed as 'no more TV'. Reboots, remakes and spin-off are sometimes abused but not all are bad. The new Hawaii 5-0 is even better than the original and two spin-off come to my mind that as good or even better than their parents, Major Crimes and The Originals, but Ironside was a disaster. The thing is not to stop doing them just do not abuse and do them well.
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They should leave the classics along period and Hawaii Five O from 2010 was just pathetic, no real story, just image, Jack Lord must be pissed in his grave.
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Amen to all of that. :)
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I've been saying for quite a while now that Hollywood is nothing but Remakes, sequels and prequels and it stinks.
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Totally with you. It just feels like we have seen every show a hundred times before (And I'm not just referring to shows that are called spin-offs or remakes).
People need to get NEW ideas and create something good that has never been seen before. THAT show would be killing in the ratings.
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i would love a reboot or remake of charmed
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Happy Days was one of the biggest shows of the 70s, and it was nostalgia for the 50s. That 70's Show was set only 22 years earlier that reality. Being nostalgic for the 90s now isn't that different than what we have been doing already. It's just that us older people (40+) don't think of the 90s as that long ago. None of this is really the problem anyway. Like everyone else here, I don't care if something is a reboot/remake/spin off/adaptation so long as it's good.

Did the new NBC show about a police detective in a wheelchair need to be called Ironside? probably not, but it would be compared to it anyway so why not use the name? Otherwise, we are at the point where no one can ever again do a show about a detective in a wheelchair because no matter how different it is, it's just an Iron remake/reboot/adaptation.

And BTW of the first 75 Best Picture Oscar winners, only 24 were from original screenplays, the rest were adaptations of other media (mostly novels, but also plays, articles, a TV show and other writing)
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Re-imaginings we need to try: Buck Rogers, Wonder Woman, The Incredible Hulk. Any of those given the BSG treatment could be good. Is there better than half a chance they would suck? Sure, just like every pilot in Hollywood is likely to fail. They already failed once with Wonder Woman, which is good, they learned what not to do without it ever coming to air so they can try again.
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I am in my early 40s, and am usually a sarcastic person, but honestly would love to give a serious review on this topic.

I grew up in the 80s, and saw every episode of Bionic Woman, Six Million Dollar Man, Charlie's Angel's, etc. I LOVED the Bionic Woman remake 3-4 years ago, and was sad it was only on for 8 episodes. But instead of a remake, I am looking for a continuation. I would LOVE to have Lyndsey Wagner in the first episode tied right in with it, giving her support and ideas to "the next generation" of bionic body parts. I know she is on Warehouse 13 now but pay her a nice sum and let her be on the first couple episodes back then. We WANT to see the originals come back for a few cameos etc.

I LOVED the new Charlie's Angels BUT, I knew from the start it would fail. I would LOVE to see Drew Barrymore IN FRONT OF the camera, who cares if she is behind it? Hell, get Lucy Lou in for a cameo etc. Have Drew play her own character for the first few episodes or as a permanent character, even if she leaves the action to the 3 new girls, she can be a consultant in every episode etc. She can be the new owner etc. Hell, bring back Kate Jackson or 1 of the other girls permanently or as a guest, even if they are in their 60s now. They can be their original characters training the new girls etc.

I remember in '82-'83-'84, I was 12-14, and loved watching Dynasty, and also Knot's Landing. My mother could not understand it, me being male and also into a totally adult night time soap opera.

I LOVED the idea of the the continuation of Dallas returning, "20 Years Later" with all the same characters and the next generation as well. Granted I never watched the original, and only watched the first 2 episodes of this one, but still enjoyed the idea.

I would LOVE to see a continuation (NOT REMAKE!) of 'Picket Fences' and also 'The Round Table'. Both premiered the same night, and Round Table only lasted 6 episodes then was cancelled but I loved both. I would love to watch a continuation of 'I Dream of Jeannie', say the grandkids of Nelson and Jeannie etc, both boy and girl genies with powers getting into mischief.

I am going to watch 'Girl Meets World' as well and enjoyed the original Boy Meets World.

So yes, I am more for continuations of series instead of reboots/remakes. Even if some or most of the original actors are now deceased, they can still pay tribute somehow to them.

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Without spinoffs, we wouldn't have had:

Angel (Buffy)
Xena (Hercules)
Star Trek: The Next Generation (Star Trek)
The Simpsons(Tracy Ullman)
NCIS (JAG)
Frasier (Cheers)

And those are the ones off the top of my head. Spinoffs are not a bad thing.
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I am not against the spin-offs of the past. But the networks are relying too heavily on them at the moment.
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I wonder if these things happen in cycles? There appear to be years with higher concentrations of spinoffs than others.
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Well prowly, just speculation here, but in the way that the article talks about creativity coming in waves, you get good spinoffs from good original material.

So the networks start with original material at SOME point in time. It's so creative and popular because everyone was bored as hell that they make spinoffs out of everything that came before. These new spinoffs are just as popular and last for years until they HOPEFULLY end naturally or wear out their welcome. And then the networks realize they need new material again.
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The terrible part is, when it was just spinoffs, they could end story-wise.

With reboots and remakes, you get the same damn shows starting from scratch and, even if the original show ended, it's like it's just beginning a second time and you have to wait for it to run its course TWICE. After you JUST SAW IT! And running concurrently with the spinoff, makes the spinoff lose its ability to impress to its best ability.
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Happy Days was itself a spinoff of Love American Style, and it spun off into Laverne & Shirley, Joanie Loves Chachi, and Mork & Mindy.

All in the Family was a remake of the British sitcom Till Death Us Do Part, and it produced a sequel series (Archie Bunker's Place) and 4 spinoffs (Maude, The Jeffersons, Gloria, and 704 Hauser). 2 of those spinoffs had spinoffs of their own: The Jeffersons begat Checking In, and Maude begat Good Times.
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Honestly, I don't care if a show is a remake, spin off or adaptation as long as it's good.
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I have no problem with The Returned being remade, I can't watch subtitled stuff without either watching what's happening and not paying attention to the words, or know what they're saying but not knowing what's actually happening. if it's in another language, sure, go ahead and remake it. that is the only exception.
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Ok, I thought about my reply to this before jumping in :-) There are actually some times when I might agree... I can't think of anything right now but I know there have been times when the dialogue has been so dense that I have actually had trouble keeping up with both sets of visuals. Perhaps something like Cyrano de Bergerac?

Having said that, this comment is a little infuriating. The amount of money that has been spent poorly duplicating foreign language film (particularly) is appalling. The real irony is that many such films demand the viewers intellectual interaction and their American remakes actually cater for an audience incapable of such interaction!

To make matters worse, even English-speaking countries' tv series are re-made! I often wonder is English another language for many Americans?
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I agree with most, but the "adaptation" thing really depends how far you want that to go, I am personally still hoping the creators of Spartacus take up the mantle of telling Caesar's story, and I could think of many Spartacus, Vikings, etc. like stories from ancient times like Boedica, Alexander, Ghengis Khan and more just waiting to be told.
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You're going a little too far here. "No more adaptions including books" is very extreme. Movies and TV shows have been based on books since cinema began. And Sherlock Holmes, Oz, fairy tales -- things like that have always been adapted and re-adapted, and always will be.

I'm with Hulsey down there -- I only care if a show is good. "Nikita" is a remake of a remake of a French movie, but it does its own thing well enough that no one complains.

And 90's TV wasn't that bad. The four decades that came before the 90's? THAT was some dumb TV.
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I think this is part of a deeper problem. For one thing, you have too many networks now trying to fill air time with anything they can, but I believe it really dilutes the talent pool, as well, to produce anything consistently good and/or significant.

I don't care what types of shows networks put on so long as they are very well written. People will watch a good family comedy so long as it's well done. I also think you are wrong saying people want edgy stuff. A lot of people watch Disney and Nickelodeon, as I think there is a desire, or even a hunger, for good family entertainment. One problem is that the major networks have given up on this and are leaving it to Disney, Nickelodeon, Hub, etc. to take over this type of programming. Unfortunately, they are not always well written and are even inconsistent with precedents, characters, and whatever. I like Good Luck Charlie and even Wizards of Waverly Place, but I do so mostly getting irritated knowing they could probably have been so much better. Hopefully, Girl Meets World will end up being pretty nice. I don't have a problem with a next generation concept - worked for Star Trek, but again, it just needs great and clever writing.

Shows like Hawaii Five-O are not bad ideas in and of themselves, but why, why did they need to use the same characters of the original? Could they not have just created a new generation of agents for the unit and have a picture of Jack Lord hanging in a n office in the background? it amazes me CBS, even Bruckheimer, did not think of this. It pisses me off that they did this and I stopped watching after the first few episodes. I wish more peopled had done so for the same reason to send a message, if nothing else.

What's wrong with doing something like Wizard of Oz as a TV series? If they are faithful to the books and had quality writing and a high production value, this could be a great success. I would also just stick with the books even if it means only a season or three and then just be done with it. A great creative team, however, could flesh out the material and expand on it for more episodes, but that gets into risky territory. Do what HBO is doing for Game of Thrones only, ya know, without a nude Dorothy or Toto taking a poop on the yellow brick road..

As far as movies go, I think it would be great that if a show does get a decent run and is then canceled, the networks and/or studios get to make a finale movie to wrap up any cliffhangers and unanswered questions unless they leave it in such a great way that leaves you wanting more, but satisfied. Journeyman's end is an example of that. Otherwise, keep your actors and crew contracted on to finish it off - maybe even make it to include exclusively on a show's potential DVD release making it even more of a reason to buy. Of course, they can't do that unless the creators and writers already know how to end their show to begin with.
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The problem is that the Wizard of Oz adaptations aren't straight adaptations. ONE IS A MEDICAL DRAMA.
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I could care less if a show is a remake or a spinoff. All I care about is if the TV show is good or not. I really liked the BattleStar remake, and the Angel spinoff from Buffy the Vampire Slayer was one of the best shows of the 90's/early 2000's. The Colbert Report was a great spin-off of the Daily Show.

If the Walking Dead Remake is good, then I will watch it. Same thing with the Better Call Saul spin-off. If the show sucks, then it will die quickly (Ironside, Bionic Woman, Nightrider).

I have to say right now we are in the age of originality. Really only the Big Networks are re-making old shows. AMC is just doing a few spin-offs, because the source material is so good so why stop.

You don't see HBO, Showtime, Cinemax, Starz, Netflix, Hulu or Amazon remaking any shows. FX hasn't remade any shows to my knowledge either (the Bridge doesn't count because 99% of America never even knew it was another foreign series).
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I completely agree but don't see this happening any time soon. It's a lot easier to produce something that's already been created and established. Movies do it. TV does it. Books do it. There's only so many good writers in the world and there's only so many good ideas to go around before things start cycling. I'm not saying I want to watch a wave of remakes and adaptations. I don't (even if Hannibal is AMAZING). But the industry is set up to maximize profit, not creativity - that's the real problem in need of tackling.
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Reboots, Spin-offs, and Adaptations are really not the problem

the problem is all the pc crap changes the make in the show
so in the end we get a unrecognizable shitty tv show

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I don't know that I agree with the "We want thought-provoking, edge-of-our-seats drama. We want exciting. We want television that's new and bold..." entirely, I don't want to only watch dramas. What's wrong with a heart warming comedy every now and then? I love a good drama as much as the next person but it can be a bit much, movies and tv don't often effect me long term, I might get wispy while watching something but once the credits role I'm back to normal, but every once in awhile something can really get me down (one example is The Deathly Hallows Part 1, I was depressed for a week or two after seeing that movie) and I think mainlining dramas might do just that. What I'm saying is I love pizza but I don't want to eat it for every meal.
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Agree with some, but not all of this thread. I see no problem in adaptations, but I think the constant reboots or copies of foreign shows as a problem. I applaud Sundance's choice to air the original series from France (with subtitles), and I kind of cringe at the idea of a remake. That said, some remakes/reboots can be quite good. No one will ever say the reboot of Battlestar Galactica was a mistake.

But please, gods, Full House?? NO!
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until the television landscape is nothing but top-notch shows it's stupid to say that they should stop trying new and or old things. it'll stick or it wont. there's a reason why you're not in a position to be making the decisions for them.
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The problem is that it's a cycle. Television networks insist on producing remakes, reboots, re-imaginings, and spin-offs because they know that just by association alone they are guaranteed to get more buzz and more viewers then they could ever garner from a new television series.

They only way to stop this from happening is for us, the viewers, to stop paying attention. But if by looking at the various amounts of articles this very site has written on the topic in the last couple of weeks is any indication, while there's still a lot of hate towards these proposed remakes, the buzz alone on them is overwhelming. I mean, we know more about a proposed CBS reboot of Charmed that doesn't even have a pilot commitment yet in comparison to several original shows that already have episode orders for next season.

It's a really frustrating situation, but I don't see any chance of the industry getting out of it in the near future.
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I mostly agree with this but . . . I still want a Chuck movie.
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Oh WHY!?!?!
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Why not?

1) It was one of my favorite show and I'd like to see more.
2) It was open-ended.
3) Some of the actors have shown interest.

That's really all it takes for me. Do I expect it to ever happen? No. But it would be nice if it did. I didn't need a Veronica Mars movie either but I'm glad that it's happening.
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