Fullmetal Alchemist

Season 3 Episode 10

Reunion of the Fallen

1
Aired Saturday 12:00 AM Nov 12, 2005 on Cartoon Network
8.7
out of 10
User Rating
105 votes
11

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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In the aftermath of the battle between Ed and Greed, Lust finds herself pondering the meaning of life: Where did she come from? And where will she go when she dies? As she questions herself, she is surprised to see a familiar face; a man whom she met two years earlier. She had helped him use alchemy to save a town that was plagued by a strange illness. Meanwhile, Ed and company search for an Ishbalan outpost in hopes of finding the more information about the Philosopher's Stone.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Poor Lydia..... In a way, I can relate to her.

    10
    This episode was very sad. In a way, I felt as if it was talking about me. The love triangle between Lydia, Lust, and I think his name was Lujon, I can't remember. Everything was good and fine for Lydia until Lust came ans tole her boyfriend and ruined everything. In the future, Lust comes back and Lujon begs her to stay and she stabs him. Lydia is very ill with a disease called Ston Sickness that turns you to stone. She runs to Lujon's body, and falls on it, and then dies. A very sad ending to a very sad episode.moreless
  • In this episode we find out about the past of Lust.

    7.8
    This episode describes Lust's past when she was in love with Scar's brother. Its a very scary episode (it really creeped me out)as Lust and her boyfriend help a plagued town. Personally I did not like this episode much. It was ok, but just ok for me. It revolved around Lust too much for me and was a little too gory for me, but thats just me and it was still an ok episode in its character development.moreless
  • "Where did I come from? Where will I go?"

    10
    This quote symbolizes a lot of things in the episode, including Lust's thoughts and the wagon coming to and leaving the town. When Lust is with Lujon, she is constantly reminded of where she came from (Scar's brother). She is then forced to move on from where she was with Lujon by killing him, symbolizing the "where will I go?" part of the quote.



    The quote is also symbolic of the wagon. It is coming to the town, showing that Lust came from a place and she's trying to accomplish something here now. As the wagon leaves at the end of the episode, it symbolizes that Lust is going somewhere different and new and she doesn't know where that is.



    Onto the quality of the episode. I must say that I enjoyed a "respite" if you will, from Ed and Al being the main focus of the episode. In this episode, the main characters are Lust and Lujon, which turns out very well. We see into Lust's past and how she apparently (haven't seen the rest of the series yet) was created by Scar's brother. It's also interesting to see how Lujon stirs these memories in her. For some reason, he reminds her of Scar's brother, though why that is aside from physical resemblance, I have no idea.



    Laura Bailey and Johnny Yong Bosch are excellent as Lust and Lujon, respectively. Bailey gets to take her role where she doesn't often go with Lust. She gets to show some emotion with the role. She pulls it off excellently. I also love how Laura Bailey can change her voice. I've heard her in Gunslinger Girl as Henrietta and I've heard her talk normally. Both voices are pretty different and both voices are totally different from Lust's voice. Johnny Yong Bosch is typically good, and this episode is no exception. He really pulls off his role well, which is good seeing as how it's his only role in FullMetal Alchemist, I believe.



    Visuals. Horrifying. That really sums it up. And not because they were bad. They were amazing. But they were disgusting. The images of the people who had been killed by the Fossil Disease were disgusting, especially the dead mother and son, both of their faces permanently twisted and contorted in agony. Just a horrifying visual. The fog at the end of the episode when Ed, Al, Winry, and Lydia show up was a very nice touch too, adding even more horror to the scene.



    I would also say that this episode has some of the best music in the series. I love the opening instrumental piece when Lust, Gluttony, and Envy are in the restaurant. It's just a great piece. But even better are the two pieces that end the episode. When Lujon pulls Lust into a hug, the music lulls us into a false sense of security, as it is a nice strings piece. It just feels good. The music stops during the flashback, and then BAM! Lust stabs him. The music immediately changes to a wonderful blend of instruments and vocals, truly bringing out the horror and sadness of the scene at the same time. Excellent music.



    And the ending. Nothing I've seen on television has ever left me totally speechless. Usually, when I'm shocked by something on TV, I'll say, "Oh, my God" repeatedly. I was literally stunned into silence. See, when we saw Lust's sword-fingers extend and blood spurt out, I thought that it was part of the flashback. Then we saw Lust and Lujon and I knew that she had killed him. It was totally surprising. Did not expect it at all. The dead bodies in the village were equally horrifying. After the episode was over, I literally did not move for about five minutes. I didn't speak or say anything. I was simply stunned.



    Overall, I would have to say that this is in the top five FullMetal Alchemist episodes I've seen. Granted, at this current point in time, this is the most recent episode I've seen. But this is an amazing episode. It uses symbolism wonderfully. It also blends together great visuals, music, voice acting, and character development. When rolled all into one, this is one of the best episodes of FullMetal Alchemist.moreless
  • Ending is what people don't like to see.

    9.4
    At this point in the series it was necessary to develop the Humonculi characters. They keep appearing but all we know is what Greed tells us and that they are "villians". This episode is somewhat like the first three episodes that begin this series. But instead it focuses around Lust and a Doctor who wishes to save his village from a terrible sickness that turns people into stone. (Much worse that what Medusa does.) It is explained that the Doctor and Lust met before and Lust gives him a red stone she calls the Philisopher Stone. (Much like the first 3 episodes.) But now that same disease has returned to the village...moreless
  • By painful, I mean depressing. Lust gets character development, and some other stuff. Spoilers.

    8.6
    Lust, Gluttony, and Envy are at a resturant. Lust is wondering where she came from, when she meets up with this guy, Lujon, who has a fake Philosopher\'s Stone. Lust helped him a couple years ago when an epidemic of people turing into stone swept his village. (People turning to stone? How is THAT possible?) Lujon cured it with Lust\'s help before, but now it\'s back and he needs her help again.

    Ed, Winry, and Al are on their way south, when they meet up with this woman in the woods. (Meet up, Ed beats the crap out of some thugs that were chasing her, same diference) She tells them her name\'s Lydia and she is looking for Lujon, who has never left his village before.

    Though flashbacks, we find out what happened two years ago. Lujon, who is very religious, was trying to cure the disease with alchemy. But he was unsuccesful. So Lust showed up and taught him alchemy. They spent long hours in his room, alone. But all they did was read about alchemy. Lydia saw them in there one time, though, and thought Lust was trying to steal Lujon from her. Lydia and Lujon were engaged.

    Finally, after learning all he can, Lust gives Lujon a fake philosopher\'s stone. Lujon is now able to cure the disease.

    Then the day comes for Lujon and Lydia to be married. Lujon is out in the woods with Lust. She tells him to go the the ceremony, but Lujon doesn\'t want Lydia. He wants Lust. He grabs her and holds her. Then Lydia comes in. They break apart, and Lydia runs off. Lust tells Lujon to go to Lydia, and he does.

    The only reason Lust gave him the fake philosopher\'s stone was to get him to search for the real stone. But he doesn\'t care about that, he just wants Lust. She leaves.

    Now, back in the present, Lujon and Lust are on their way to his village. They get there, and Lujon cures the people with the new fake philosopher\'s stone Lust gave him. That night, they\'re standing together, and Lujon embraces Lust again. He says this time he won\'t let go. But Lust stabs him and kills him. The villagers immediately start breaking out with the disease again.

    The next day, Lydia, Ed, Al, and Winry arrive at the village. But everyone\'s dead from the stone disease. Lydia runs through the village calling for Lujon. When Ed, Al, and Winry catch up to her, she\'s lying on the ground next to Lujon, also dead with the stone disease. And somehow Lujon is stone, too. (Now how is that possible? He was already dead! Well at least now Lydia won\'t know that Lust killed him.) And that\'s the end of the episode.



    That was one of the most depressing episodes I\'ve seen so far. Everyone dies. The end. Ugh. Nice character development with Lust, though. She kept remembering Scar\'s brother when she was with Lujon. I didn\'t know that Homonculi could remember their part life. I wonder if Sloth will remember when she fights Ed?

    I\'m not sure if Lust killed Lujon because she didn\'t want him to suffer with the stone disease or if just killed him to kill him. She didn\'t resist either time he held her. She looked like she enjoyed it, actually. Who knows?moreless
Johnny Yong Bosch

Johnny Yong Bosch

Lujon

Guest Star

Carrie Savage

Carrie Savage

Lydia

Guest Star

Emily Hornsby

Emily Hornsby

Additional Voices

Guest Star

Mike McFarland

Mike McFarland

Additional Voices

Recurring Role

Bill Townsley

Bill Townsley

Scar\'s Brother

Recurring Role

Kyle Hebert

Kyle Hebert

Additional Voices

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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