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I was going to do 10, but in the Light of The Seven, I chose to do the 7 reasons why Game of Thrones is not for children that have nothing to do with nudity or blood or any other element you could find in the average CW show - and that mature audiences can hadle in a way younger audiences aren't ready to do just yet.

7. No Reward System
If there's anything that separates younger audiences from adult ones is the craving for a reward; children can stand Sansa Stark as long as she's made Prom Queen, they can endure Ned Stark's imprisonment as long as he's victorious, and they might tolerate his defeat as long as Robb avenges him. Take that away and it would only frustrate them more than the finale of How I Met Your Mother ever did.

It's the kind of things that only mature audiences - or, at least, viewers old enough to have learned to tolerate frustration - would understand. Life happens, sometimes there's no storybook ending, and the worst part is: it doesn't stop then, you may have to learn to keep on living, just like the Starks did.

6. Marriage isn't supposed to make the characters happy
I was going to say "Love" but, lets face it, marriage is never out of love in Westeros (and the one time it was, ironically it ended on a wedding). Marriage is a force meant to stabilize a Realm even if it makes Cersei & Robert miserable, the foundation in which several lives stand on even if Catelyn and Ned didn't even know each other when it was imposed on them, the touchstone by which Stannis, Margaery, Tyrion, Daenerys and Tywin meassure themselves.

Marriage isn't supposed to make them happy, but the support the characters find in it will do: it's the certainty someone is backing them up even if they are despised by said someone, the aid they will find in times of war, sickness and famine just because a Septon said the words, the shelter in which children, servant and maesters make a life for themselves because a Lord and a Lady can't walk away from it.

5. True love doesn't last forever
Try to explain to younger audiences something like Jon and Ygritte makes you wish to make it all about the nudity: they just can't wrap their minds around the fact that two people who love each other can't beat the obstacles and be together.

To be fair, Jon and Ygritte didn't wrap their mind around it themselves until life did the math for them. True love is a rare gift and some of them are lucky to find it, but that doesn't ensure they would get to keep it no matter how profound (Daenerys & Drogo), intense (Jaime & Cersei) or passionate (Robb & Talisa) their feelings may be.

4. Puppies get killed
There's no bigger punch for younger audiences than to watch a character their age be thrown out of a window (Bran), watch their pet dog get killed (Sansa), be drowned to dead or stabbed by their father's men (Gendry's siblings) or get hunted down on their way back home (Arya, Lommy, Hot Pie, etc.).

Younger audiences aren't ready to watch one of their own get killed, especially not when back-stabbed by the people they trusted the most, something adult audiences have learned also happens in real life. Sometimes to their own young, by the very people they have trusted with them (teachers, neighbors, relatives, etc.)

3. Adults lie (deal with it)
Its a pretty basic fact for mature audiences, but one thing is to play "trust no one" as younger audiences do with one cast or another and other, entirely different, to actually grasp the reality that adult characters lie, not only to others but also - and particularly - to themselves the way Littlefinger, Cersei, Thoros of Myr, Margaery and Bolton have done.

There's nothing more disarming for mature audiences than to realize a character wasn't who they thought it was, and yet Jaime Lannister is nothing compared to what younger audiences may feel when enlighten by characters such as Ramsay or Melisandre.

2. Women are strong
Its easy to ask younger audiences to accept the strength from warrior ladies of Marvel's Agents of SHIELD or Arrow, but it puzzles them to find the same strength within Lady Margaery (one of the most dangerously strong and feminine characters on TV) or Olenna, they can grasp the power within Melisandre but they don't get it doesn't come from her sexuality, they may brand Brienne as a lesbian but they can't see the strength that comes from her femeninity quite like Jaime and Renly did.

It's a rare thing, to introduce younger audiences to characters that aren't Yara or Ygritte and ask them to see their strength, to find the source of Daenerys's in frustrated motherhood rather than her dragons or to understand the most dangerous women in this show are those that aren't carrying a weapon.

1. Bad guys do win. Deal with it.
I
t's one thing to ask mature audiences to accept Tywin Lannister can win just like your evil boss does, that you are in capable hands even if those hands belong to Mance Rayder, the King Beyond the Wall, or that Walder Frey and Lord Bolton can get away with things like The Red Wedding. However, you can't ask the same thing from younger audiences.

What's even worse, you can't expect younger audiences to understand there's good and evil in every man, that you can see the good and evil in Theon Greyjoy just like you can see it in Arya Stark; the good and evil side in sworn shields like Jorah Mormont just like you can see it in The Hound; that is alright to admire the evil side in Stannis just like you can admire the good in him or to respect the evil in Daenerys just as you do with the good in her.

So, there you have it, My Top 7 Reasons why Game of Thrones is not for children that have nothing to do with gore, dark twists or nudity. I want your honest opinion, so hit the poll, add a comment or tell me what are your top reasons Game of Thrones is not suited for younger audiences or why you believe children can deal when puppies get killed or true doesn't last forever.

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I disagree. I'm a 13 year old girl who watches Game of Thrones - I'm honest. I've read the books and I love the show, and as mohawk said, not for the violence or sex, but for the excellent plot and characters. I'm perfectly fine with the themes; it's not like I'm going to go around murdering my friends, swearing everywhere, or thinking about sex all day long after watching the show. It's not like that. I think it really depends on the person. Maybe some people will have serious negative influences, but you can't judge everyone just because of what most people do. I doubt that the teens who don't watch the show are much better off than those who do. They still talk about inappropriate stuff every day, and I'm proud to say that I don't. Game of Thrones has a great story and very interesting characters (my favorite is Jaime Lannister haha) so I think it's unfair to say that I shouldn't be allowed to watch it. Especially if I'm allowed to read it.
If we're allowed to post on here then I guess parents can't stop us from watching it secretly anyway.
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I'm going to get slaughtered for this. I'm a 14 year old girl who watches Game of Thrones not for the sex, violence or the dragons. I watch Game of Thrones because I love it, it keeps me on the edge of my sit, I love the character development, for Arya Stark (she is the best, if she dies we riot), for a good plot twist and because it is a great show. Saying that we will not understand much about it is a load of crap, I've been reading the books for quiet a while and I'm pretty sure I understand what's going on. I will not care about lots of main characters dying another load of crap. Thank you for your time. I kind of agree with you though even if I still watch it
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Then again, I can't tell if you're a 45 year old posing as a 14 year old any more than you can tell if I'm a 14 year old posing as my 34 year old mother, there's no telling on the internet...

Al I can say is that these are the reasons why I believe children won't understand the show, regardless whether or not they watch it.
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Really, no. Just no. The show depends completely on the maturity of the person not the age. Sure some people like you assume that certain ages have certain levels of maturity but thats just not true past 11 years or so old. You must understand that a 14, such as myself understands Game of Thrones even if my parents do not want me watching it; I am going to watch it anyway. I have the level of maturity needed to watch that show. It doesn't matter what my parents think because I completely understand it, even if you don't think 14 year olds can. Downton Abbey is my favourite TV show so I obviously understand that, I also understand American Horror Story and Breaking Bad; so I can understand and I have the maturity as do most 14 year olds regardless of the common maturity-age stereotype which you obviously believe in.
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It's not about what poses at maturity, but the basic understanding of a plot that doesn't demand a whole faction to get themselves killed just to save the one guy a teenage character thinks it's cute, or that a "bad guy"'s s story is not all about redemption or that a "good guy"'s story is ending long before it starts.

And it's not just the mature characters, younger audiences don't often understand the storylines of characters their own age, which is why they see Arya as a psychopath rather than a war child growing up in the middle of an armed conflict, or see Bran as a wizard or a hero rather than a force of nature struggling to get rid of a role that no longer suits him.
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Once again you are describing us "youths" as people who can't understand a complex plot line because we are immature. While this is true for most people below 13, you cannot judge people older than that based on their age, you must base the permission to watch on purely maturity. Every person is different. A lot of people above 13 have been exposed to the content of the show even if you do not agree.
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killing the puppies and beheading horses yeah i think GOT is like alcohol if you're not yet 21 it's not legal to have it.
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Maybe that's why younger audiences crave it so much: anyone can drink before 21, but actually get adult fantasy mature audiences are watching? It might just make the show the new rite of passage.
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Funny - I'd say that # 1, 2, 3, and 5 rather is reasons why kids SHOULD watch the show..... (Note that I would't consider GoT the best show for kids, but I DO think that a kids movie dealing with those 4 aspect would be great. Point in case: Roald Dahl)
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Is not about what younger audiences "should" watch or not, but rather what they actually like to watch and what they would be watching.

Breastfeeding and incest is one thing (they might overcome the "eww" factor), but the reality of true love, adult life and real life's bad guys may be just too much for them even in fantasy code.

Younger audiences need the Reward System for a reason; Katniss gets to kill the bad guys, Bella's suitors never get tired of her and Harry Potter doesn't die for the same reason.
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Somehow I think you are not talking about "children" at all, because the first things that come to my mind when I think why I shouldn't let them watch GoT are definitely the gory violence and the sex scenes. Your "7 reasons" seem to be limited to adults. Unless children in your definition are between 16 and 20 years old.
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I would say mature audiences have a bigger issue with Melisandre's role in Stannis and Davos lives, what was done to Ned Stark's sword, or the inaction against The White Walkers more than anything else.

Maybe some adults would have a gut reaction against breastfeeding and castration too, but I wouldn't say that's the norm.
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There is also a big chance they find it boring.

Yup, this can be more shocking to you I guess.

:-)


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Peer pressure: it would take one brave kid to say he/she finds it boring, an even braver one to type that online.
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Oh boy, you're gonna get slaughtered for reason number 2...
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That's a very American point of view.

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An interesting article, but most of Game of Thrones is pretty much just European history - with dragons. We teach this in schools without it being a big issue and it features most of the headings identified, especially about who is good and who is bad. It depends what definition of a child is being used, but I think it's pretty much understood.

It may be that television has brainwashed children into thinking that all fiction must happen in a certain way, unlike the real life they have learnt about, making it hard to digest?

Looking at the voting, I'm obviously in a minority, but I'm not convinced that the 'bad' guys will win in GoT. I guess it depends at what point you draw a line and say "That's the winner", remembering that we're only half way through the story.
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I totally agree. Also, the definition of good and bad is really murky in GoT, as within real life. To throw a term around like 'good' or 'bad' is oversimplified, and is too reminiscent of the media that children consume, that I think the author is attempting to separate GoT from in the article? It's only seeing one side of the coin. The 'bad guys' who may win in GoT are ultimately somebody else's good guys.
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True. I'm only thinking that way because of Ned, Lommy and the latente Story of Elia. I don't know yet if Bran, Arya or Oberyn will prevail.
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I completely agree that good guys don't necessarily win.
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I'd say what makes them the good guys in GoT is not whether or not they will win, but rather that they never gave up trying.
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Latest instead of latent
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How about the time slot? It is on late at night not early in the morning!
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How about the Thenn cuisine? Is an argument in itself right there.
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So GOT isn't for kids because women are deceptively strong? Good to know its not just the violence and nudity.
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They are not deceptively, that's the whole point: Strenght is femenine despite younger audiences are programmed to believe the opposite (that strenght is masculine).
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Are you saying all strength is feminine? Or do you mean that strength is strength, there can be strong women or strong men and for different reasons or the same reasons. There can also be weak and cowardly men and women.
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Even so, why is this a reason children shouldn't watch Game of Thrones?
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For some reason I can't reply to your next reply, but I wanted to reply to this line in particular - The nudity and violence are THE ONLY reasons why my kid isn't watching Game of Thrones.

Really? The nudity is what bothers you? So you'd be okay with your kids watching a man rape his sister as long as you don't see her breast while it happens? Because seeing the opposite gender will corrupt your children, but the rape is fine?

What is it about nudity that makes people freak out? I mean, the scenes where they're nude and having sex (let alone rape sex) I could understand you not wanting your younger children to see, but just seeing a bare chested woman? ridiculous.
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Rape counts as violence, genius.
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She's not citing reasons why children shouldn't watch the show. She's citing reasons children don't have the maturity to understand the show properly & thus, why it's not for children.
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You described the same thing. Even still, I can't wrap my head around this. Out of everything else, children don't have the maturity to understand women is a reason why this show is not for them? Really? This isn't a good reason in my opinion at least. If anything this show can teach kids women can be just as smart, cunning, and ruthless as men as oppose to the damsels in distress in their books.

But unfortunately my child won't be able to see just how awesome the females characters can be until they're old enough. Not because women are strong. The nudity and violence are THE ONLY reasons why my kid isn't watching Game of Thrones.
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Bah... all kids have ADHD and don't have the tolerance to sit down for more than 5 minutes anyways.

/amidoingitrite?
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nice post !!!
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So.... aside from the two obvious reasons: extreme violence and copious sexual imagery and references (sometimes in the same scene).... these are 7 other reasons that GOT isn't for kids...
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Seven other reasons GoT isn't for kids would be:
  • Heavily religious plots (younger audiences may not get them)
  • Incest (same thing, plus the "Eww" factor)
  • Breastfeeding (especially when it comes to 8 year olds)
  • Mutilation/Castration (especially for the plot demands its audience to relate to the victim).
  • Cultural connotation of Bastards (XXIst centuries kids may strongly disagree with it)
  • Medieval intercourse is the opposite of erotic (or sex isn't sexy)
  • Monarchy (or Why isn't Westeros a Democracy?)
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I don't understand the breastfeeding bit. It's a natural part of life... Again, I'm a little confused here: are you saying children shouldn't watch GoT because of above reasons (your comment, not the article), or children wouldn't relate to GoT for said reasons?
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I'm saying the reaction of a 14 year old to the breastfeeding scene is more likely to resemble the reaction of an 8 year old, rather than the reaction of a 21 old - and older - to the same scene.
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...what? Anyone seeing a 8-10 year old is going to have the same reaction. It's messed up. Granted, their reaction might be a bit more vocal but me and my 25 year old friends all had the same, ew jesus christ, wtf? reaction.
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If only parents were willing to explain those things properly, it might not be a problem. Children aged 12 and up, shouldn't grow up thinking good always wins or that puppies never die.
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I'd say the reward system is the biggest issue for a kid between 12 to 18 for they may never get why Sansa isn't Prom Queen already, Robb ninja-butt-kicked everyone at The Red Wedding, and probably are still waiting for Daenerys to devastate those who wronged her family rather than "be stuck in the desert".
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Depends on the person. Personally I never expect Sansa to become some "Prom queen" or any of the other things you mentioned. I understand the themes well enough and yes, I do watch it without parents' permission, but it's only because they won't understand that I genuinely enjoy it not because of the violence and sex but for the plot and characters. As a big fantasy fan I can certainly say that.
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Most people are still waiting for Daenerys to take back her homeland. And we can understand her wanting to leave Meereen better than she found it, but we still think she should get the fuck back to Westeros, then maybe come back with the might of the 7 kingdoms to liberate them.

Do you raise your kids to expect that every thing they do will result in a good reward? Also, the fact that you lump 12 year olds in the same category as 18 year olds is ridiculous. Anyone in that age group COULD watch Game of Thrones and understand what is going on generally. But from 15-18 you will generally have the same understanding as an adult. You don't suddenly flip a switch and are an adult at 19.
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They are being fed with those ideas. Wouldn't it be a good idea to confront them with a little more reality?
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Question is: would they want to?

Kids just need to know theit parents won't buy them something, they don't want to know their parents are broke, they can't pay the bills or that they may lose the kid's home.

Same thing with Game of Thrones: younger audiences just need to know it's for adults, they don't want to know why. Not really.
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I knew that my parents were broke and struggling, I would have rather known that than been naive and think my parents were just being assholes. Knowing I grew up poor made me less likely to ask for something and now I know better that if I want something I need to work hard for it.
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Personally, I'm glad this show came out when it did.
When I was a kid, my parents were pretty cool about exposing me to adult content in books, movies & TV, so I learned to absorb things before my peers did. While it gave me a sense of superiority in understanding at the time, in reality, I was still just a kid & didn't have the life experience to relate to the deeper meanings of the majority of what I was watching & reading.

If I were watching this show from the ages of say, somewhere 'tween 10-14, I'd be into it, but I'd be almost completely clueless to the things that make the show great while glazing over most of the time waiting for the fights, the dragons & the tits to happen while still convincing myself that I "get it all"
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There are so many movies you experience different as a kid. That makes it so nice to revisit them once in a while.

It's the argument you hear about paul verhoeven's starship troopers. Younger audiences see it as a nice violent movie, more eductaed people see a sharp satire about facism.

You are allowed to enjoy certain parts about a movie or series and learn more about it during reruns.


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I'd say this is more like Pan's Labyrinth: kids may see a dark fantasy labelled for adults .

Adults see the actual story about facism and the tale of two siblings that never knew their father's name. And it was dark for a reason.
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I don't disagree, but I have to say, all of your points and the nudity and violence thing sort of depend on the actual age of the kids.

Are we talking 0-18? 0-21?

I think some destinctions have to be made. For kids of... lets say under 14... I think all those points are valid. After that, at some point you DO realize that puppies get killed (4) and adults lie (3). Also with the divorcerate being about 50% most kids even at that age have direct or indirect experience with the fact that marriage isn't supposed to make you happy (6) and they surely don't always need a reward system (7).

Maybe the hardest point to "get" is number 2, after all there are people out there over 50 that still don't get it.

In the end the descision is in the hands of (hopefully) responsible parents that can best judge if their kids are mature enough to deal with a TV show like GoT. And, at a certain age, it surely is difficult to police what a teenager watches when out of your home.
And finally ideology and religion usually enter the descision-making process of parents. At that point all rational reasoning leaves the building anyway.
More+
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Actually, I'd say divorce does the opposite of Game of Thrones: it convinces that you have the chance to leave if you're unhappy where Cersei and Robert held a kindgom together no matter how miserable.

Religion is a complicated topic because I could see how agnostic households would take an issue with a story that deals with religion so decisevely, especially when Westeros religion is even more devisive than the one we find in real life.
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"Take that away and it would only frustrate them more than the finale of How I Met Your Mother ever did" If you are one of the many on tv.com that hated the HIMYM finale you've just answered the question as to why fans hated it, people that hated the finale must of had the maturity of a child and were unable to grasp that the ending was not going to be what they wished it was, (somehow they forget that not getting the ending they want has no bearing on the quality of an episode... but kids, what can you do?)
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I think a lot of the HIMYM backlash was because people thought it would be what they wanted. I heard a great complaint summing up this attitude and acknowledging what it really is: "If I want something sad I'll watch real life, not HIMYM..."
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That's a "Reward System" issue for sure.
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I agree with everything you wrote, but not number 2.
One reason why children - as you put it - can't see the strength in women is because they grow up with the "man strong - woman weak"-stereotype. So the best solution is to keep raising them with that stereotype?
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Its not that, but rather the femenine = weak and masculine = strong stereotype of TV. Younger audiences can't see girly girls like Margaery as dangerous because, for them, she isn't strong unless she wields a weapon.

Younger audiences also can't understand the concept of "she is the weapon" unless they relate it to sex, so they can't grasp the concept of characters like Missandei, Daenerys or Lady Melisandre quite like adult audiences do.

In this case, the best scenario would be to wait for them to grow up more than anything else.
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Basically kids want spring and GoT deals with winter :P
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What about Boobs? Reading the title , i thought you will talk about boobs. Sadly i couldn't find that. if u ask anyone y GOT is not for kids , 1st thing they will say is "Boobs"
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What part of the "aside from violence or nudity" didn't you understand? It was in the first 2 sentences
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OOPS my bad , i skipped the 1st paragraph , started reading from point no. 7
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These are exactly the seven reasons, why I stopped watching GoT. Must be a child at heart. :D
Mostly, I can't stand when bad guys win. It may be a universal truth, but I deal with it in every day life, so I like my Fantasy world to be less real than that.
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Maybe they will get punished in the end.

That's the fun part of a story, you don't know how it ends untill it has ended.
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Then again, Game of Thrones demands the patience of an adult to wait for said punishment in a way younger audiences aren't ready for.

Imagine younger audiences waiting for years for Bran's happy ending only to watch him lose his legs, his mother, his father his older brother, his surrogate brother, Sir Roderick, his Maester, his home, the last chance to reunite with his bastard brother, his baby brother (to protect him) and his sisters all before he reaches the middle of his story.
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I have not read the books. I am still hanging on to the idea that the evil guys getting punished soon. I think many fans have similar feelings. We are all still hoping.

The definition of "evil guy" is also probably different for each individual. Jeffory is probably the most hated but the rest are debatable.

I do think in the end, we will get some of what we want. Again I have not read the books so I do not know any spoilers. I am just still hoping.
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Keep on waiting... I've read all the books twice and I'm still waiting for a happy ending. I mean things deff do get better for the "heroes" and worse for the "villains" but not where I would like it
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To me, the possibility of a happy ending for the Starks died with Robb, and Catelyn, and Ned.

...And Mathos (for Davos), and Lord Commander Mormont (for Ser Jorah), and Renly (for Brienne, Loras and Margaery), and Robert (for Ned) and Lyanna (for Robert) and so on.
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Lol yes I could see where that would leave a dagger in the heart
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I still cringe wehener Arya is hunted down or Gendry is filled with leeches and they are still alive.

Thing is, I can deal if they never get to "live happily ever after" but I understand why kids their agemay have an issue with it.
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While I'm on the other side of the spectrum (even if it is just a TV Show, i hate it when they make a show look like My Little Pony with all the happy endings, just ignoring reality) I do find it a little bit unrealistic that up to Season 3, the bad guys keep winning the important fights.
In real life there are some happy endings as well, it's not that evil always prevails.

However I haven't read the books so maybe this changes down the line but UP UNTIL NOW it's as if the creators, in an attempt to be more realistic and not have the good guys win all the time, they went to the opposite side where there is only suffering for those pictured more heroish
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In fantasy, the good guys are all about total victory: you can tell who they are because, regardless the odds, they always defeat the enemy.

On Game of Thrones, however, its like in real life
  • Jaime gets true love, but he can't see it no matter how many bear pits he jumps in,
  • Daenerys gets to be a mother, but not to the baby she gave birth to,
  • Tyrion gets respect, but not from his father,
  • Arya gets to have a family(ies), but its not her family(ies),
  • Davos gets to save a boy from The Red Woman, but it wasn't his son,
  • etc.
Those little things that we call small victories does fulfill them, but its not the ultimate victory we have come from expect from the good gys
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What I'm pointing out is that while I agree with you - IRL sometimes the good guys have to settle for small victories - the producers/writers/Martin (basically him, he has written the books) are trying so hard to go against the stream that says "in movies/tv shows the good guys finally win", they are trying so hard to point out that IRL good guys can loose, that they have the villainous families take all the important wins

To put it in numbers, IRL let's say good prevails e.g. 3 out of 10, in mainstream Hollywood its 9 out of 10. In GoT they are trying so hard to go against the norms that good prevails 0 out of 10 thus far
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To be fair, bad guys also lose, it's just that the audience is programmed not to care.

However, I care when Cersei loses, regardless how I do feel about bad guys like her. I'm concerned about Melisandre, even after what she has done to Davos. I fear for Margaery no matter how manipulative she might be.

I admire Tywin, even when I despise him; I'm rooting for Bolton, despite of what he did; I felt bad about Craster even if he was a bastard and so on. What's so real about this show, is that it demands is audience to care regardless which side the characters are on.
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Daenerys had been winning her battles and I always enjoy her story line most ! Arya also got out of danger many times.
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The thing is Daenerys hasn't won any really significant battle yet (she is in the building process still, her wins are not against her opponents i.e. the other claimers of the Throne) and Arya escaping danger is like a sports team avoiding relegation when what we want is the championship.

Regarding big wins, only the Lannisters and their allies have made really significant triumphs
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I think it those characters defy the role rather than the odds, Arya survives because, in her Septa's words, she fights back like a "wild beast rather than to act like a Lady", despite her society taught her Ladies have to wait for someone to defend them.

Daenerys survives because she bets every card she ever had on Astapor, Qarth and her marriage to Khal Drogo. Just because the gamble has worked so far doesn't mean this could've gone horribly, horribly wrong.
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I just wanted to make the point that some "good" guys are winning.
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Do you even know any of any children who watch this show? I don't.
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My cousins do and they're twelve and eleven.
Or something.
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Hmmm. Fair enough, I guess it depends on the intellectual and emotional maturity of the child and like @ionee24 says below, sometimes it depends on the individual too. When it comes to your cousins, I hope their parents have explained that "it's just a fake TV show" thing really well to them. :-)

I mean I remember being allowed (or getting away with) watching things that I was way too young for when I was a kid. However I had an older sister and my parents always took the time to really explain and put things in perspective for me.
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I wasn't allowed to watch Northern Exposure and Pickett Fences until I would "come of age".

As as ridiculous as the notion sounded to me at the time, after watching the DVDs, I've got to admit there's no way I'd have fully understood some of the subjets. And it has nothing to do with the fact Fleishman didn't end up with O'Connell.
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@mattjennings520: Kids may not understand the pop culture references on Shrek, but those references are also PG-13, at most. It's not the same as to expect them to fully understand incest, religion, committed marriages or any other adult subject that pass right by them.
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But this is also true of many kids movies, for instance, Shrek has a lot of jokes in it for the adults that as a kid go right over your head and you watch it again and then realize the other jokes. Just because you won't fully understand something doesn't mean you shouldn't watch it.
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Lol. At what age did you "come of age" though. Or is there a standard age for that in the U.S.? I'm Aussie so we work on a bit of a different level.
Also, I'm come from European parents who are a generally a lot more relaxed, open and honest with their kids. I was also a very mature kid. So I guess I'm not the best example. Lol

My little nephew is 9 and I'm sure that my sister wouldn't let him watch GOT until he at least has the emotional and intellectual maturity to grasp that "it's not real life". Also, I doubt he'd be interested in 99% percent of it. Maybe just the bits that included swords. Lol
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I know a couple who want to watch the show, but they are just teenagers who often act like children more than anything else.
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I guess it really depends on the maturity of the child or teen in question too.
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Well, they think it's all about boobs and the violence and keep talking about The Vampire Diaries and Nikita as the biggest example as to why they are "ready" to watch this show. So they come across as childish to me.
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Oh yeah. They sound like definite morons. No offense but yeah people who watch GOT for the sex and violence are part of the problem in today's society.
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Interesting comment... it was quite difficult to choose my number one but I voted for "Adults lie (deal with it)", even though it might not seem as a really tough option.

I also strongly considered "Bad guys do win. Deal with it." but then I thought that each and every kid, maybe the first time they go outside/to the playground/to kindergarten/to a family meeting, gets in touch with "nasty kids", so this might be an experience they have relatively early in their lives. Seeing that on a TV-show wouldn't be such a big shock then.

Lying adults is a far more difficult complex. Of course children should learn not to trust everybody, but they should feel safe with their family members, in their homes, with trusted friends. Questioning this concept because of seeing how brothers and sisters, fathers and sons, cousins and other relatives lie to each other for their personal gain might be really disturbing.
What I would like to know, though, is what's the age range of being a child from your point of view. Until they are 8, 10, 12?
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Anything between the ages from Myrcella to Rickon, or the infants killed by Craster & Ser Janos Slynt to children like Lommy & Hot Pie.
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