Generator Gawl

Season 1 Episode 4

Future Memory

0
Aired Unknown Oct 28, 1998 on
9.1
out of 10
User Rating
2 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
Future Memory
AIRED:
Ryo has a disturbing dream about the Generators and his research with Gawl. He can’t concentrate in class and is excused. While his friends worry about him, Ryo takes the opportunity to sneak into Prof. Takuma Nekasa’s lab, and discovers not only his research progress but encounters the professor himself!moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Thursday
No results found.
Friday
No results found.
Saturday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Finally some background!

    8.5
    All this time I've been sitting here wondering just what Gawl is and why the three of them have been placed in the "future." This episode has been the closest thing to revealing any of that information. The flashbacks and dreams allowed a lot of insight into Ryo's character, explaining why he blames himself for many of the things that go wrong in their escapade. This episode leaves many of the other characters seeming naive and unobservative because it focuses so tightly on a single character.



    The plot advancement is rather slow, but has picked up pace since the previous episode. I give this one an 8.5/10.moreless
Lew Temple

Lew Temple

English Professor [E]

Guest Star

Anna Bechtol

Anna Bechtol

Dream Crowd [E]

Guest Star

Catherine Eisele

Catherine Eisele

Dream Crowd [E]

Guest Star

John Swasey

John Swasey

Professor Tekuma Nekasa

Recurring Role

Shoji Izumi

Shoji Izumi

Teacher [J]

Recurring Role

Kumiko Yokote

Kumiko Yokote

Chichi [J]

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (1)

    • (Ryo is excused from class because he was feeling sick)
      Gawl: I wish I was sick.
      Masami: Oh, believe me, Gawl, you are.
      Gawl: Of you.

  • NOTES (0)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • In the dub, Masami talks about pulling a Salman Rushdie act before, that is, she wanted to be alone for a while.

      Salman Rushdie's book, The Satanic Verses, incited the Muslim community to the point where some of its leaders proclaimed a death sentence on him, and he had to go into hiding.

More
Less