Ghost Hunters

Season 2 Episode 2

Grafton and Cranston Case

0
Aired Wednesday 10:00 PM Aug 03, 2005 on Syfy
7.7
out of 10
User Rating
37 votes
3

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

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Grafton and Cranston Case
AIRED:

TAPS investigate a case of entities reportedly threatening children in a home in Grafton, Massachussets. After this investigation, they are called to a home in Cranston, Rhode Island, much nearer their headquarters.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Compared to other Ghost Hunters episodes... this one is boring.

    5.0
    I love getting into bed and watching Ghost Hunters every night, and I usually find them fun to watch, and I\'m interested in looking at the camera and trying to catch things, but this episode was just so uneventful, and quite honestly boring.



    If you have a choice, just watch a different episode.
  • Not quite one of the knock your socks off episodes that make this series so much fun.

    5.8
    I'd have to agree with the previous reviewer about the analytical value of the episode. It does show very clearly the different approaches to the job that the team takes versus how Brian and Jason handle things.



    But as to hair-raising encounters or solid evidence, this ep is a bit lacking. Granted you can't expect something like that every time, but that is, of course why we tune in. It is my observation, from viewing the series so far, every time an episode has more than one case for TAPS to investigate, it will most likely be a zero evidence episode.



    As stated in the previous review the EVP evidence is a bit week this time around and the first case garnered no evidence at all. So, by my own rationale, I should skip the episodes that have more than one case. But will I? Probably not. I'll stay riveted to the TV for the same reason that Jason and Brian insisted on going over the evidence again... I don't want to miss anything.moreless
  • Nothing major, but revealing about how TAPS handles their work

    6.0
    If you think of this series as a serialized drama with “reality TV” as its source material, to be edited and used as necessary, then it doesn’t take long to wonder if all that attention on Brian last week was meant to inform the events of this episode. There are little hints about things not getting done correctly during the first case, and during the analysis of the second case, the emphasis is strongly on Brian and Steve fooling around and missing possible evidence. Not good for Brian!



    This episode also highlights the difference between Jason and Grant, who take this all very seriously and personally, and some of the support staff, who seem to have their own psychological reasons for wanting to be a part of TAPS. I’m not convinced that Brian is there for the work itself; as he mentioned before, it’s more that he’s got nothing else in which to invest his life. At least Steve is just a guy who needs to learn how to retain attention on a task.



    Andy’s another odd one. I love his sincerity, but the underlying message of the episode for him was self-control. Andy gets a bit too worked up when on a case, and it hurts the credibility of the team. The way I see it, just reacting like that changed the way everyone else approached the case. Subjective interpretations are par for the course, but it doesn’t help when one person’s reaction (and a questionable one at that) starts influencing those interpretations.



    But this was another example of how TAPS operates. Setting aside the usual questions of staged drama and fake cases (I have little patience for those who seek to tear down something based solely on the logic of their own ill-informed conjecture), episodes like this are necessary. Sure, it’s not as much fun as the more active cases, but if every episode was filled with evidence of extreme activity, I’d be a lot more skeptical. Episodes like this demonstrate that some cases have simple, “real world” explanations, and I think it’s important to remind the audience of that.



    OK, so on to the cases themselves!



    First stop: Cranston, RI. Quite frankly, I think Andy was having a panic attack based on what he thought might happen, not what was happening. That said, I was intrigued by the fact that there could have been something happening in the basement. Sure, basements are drafty, and there wasn’t really enough to pin a case on, but it was intriguing. One can’t help but wonder if there was evidence, but it was missed.



    But it’s more of a case of people seeking unusual explanations for things that, at this point, seem rather mundane in substance. It wasn’t exactly hard to figure out what was happening with the kids, and the parents should have considered that possibility. And don’t even get me started about the cat! Any cat owner knows to discount a lot of strangeness when a cat is running around in the dark!



    Next stop: Grafton, MA. Well, they really do everything possible to smooth over the news, but Jason and Grant both seem to think that Hayley is at the center of classic poltergeist activity. Typically, it’s not that spirits are hostile towards a young woman, so much as the activity is a subconscious psychic reflection of psychological issues that the young woman carries within her. Why it happens largely to young women is somewhat bizarre, but going by the historically anecdotal conclusions of others, that’s how it’s supposed to work.



    The evidence, in my opinion, points to the idea that the two women in the house are causing the phenomena to occur, and when Jason was beginning to catch on to that, he was “attacked”. Is it 100% certain that it happened that way? Of course not. It wasn’t on camera, so we only have Jason’s word on it. But it does fit the profile, doesn’t it?



    Anyway, the second case was more important in terms of showing how the evidence should be analyzed, instead of the haphazard manner in which Brian and Steve run through it. I’m not convinced in terms of the EVP, but Brian did miss it, and that’s an issue. Personally, I think that Jason and Grant might be better served to replace Brian with the new guy and put Andy on the review of evidence. If Andy is that hair-trigger with his interpretations, then he’s probably the perfect guy to present possible evidence for Jason and Grant to review. Part of the problem is that Brian and Steve are making the judgments themselves, and it’s clear that it’s not working.

    moreless
Brian Harnois

Brian Harnois

Tech Manager

Grant Wilson (II)

Grant Wilson (II)

Co-Founder of TAPS and Lead Investigator

Jason Hawes

Jason Hawes

Founder of TAPS and Lead Investigator

Steve Gonsalves

Steve Gonsalves

Tech Specialist

Donna LaCroix

Donna LaCroix

Case Manager

Andy Andrews (II)

Andy Andrews (II)

Investigator

Jill Raczelowski

Jill Raczelowski

TAPS Archivist

Guest Star

Ray Milione

Ray Milione

Research and Development

Guest Star

Dustin Pari

Dustin Pari

Tech Trainee

Recurring Role

Carl Johnson

Carl Johnson

Demonologist

Recurring Role

Heather Drolet

Heather Drolet

Investigator

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (4)

    • The first investigation of the Grafton house took place on January 29-30, 2005, according to the date embedded in the camera footage. The investigation of the DiRaimo house occurred on February 13-14, 2005.

    • Also Appearing:
      Investigation 1: Grafton House - Grafton, Massachusetts
      Angela Scovil - Resident
      Tricia Bentley - Resident
      Rick Baker - Resident

      Investigation 2: DiRaimo House - Cranston, Rhode Island
      Ken DiRaimo - Homeowner
      Hayley DiRaimo - Daughter

      At Home: Jason's House
      Kris Hawes - Jason's Wife

    • Hayley's sister, who is not present any time during the investigation, is named Stacy. Donna mentions this when they enter Stacy's room.

    • The TAPS team refers to the bone found beneath the house as a "vertebrae", which is plural for "vertebra". Since they just found one, they should say "vertebra", but we can't blame them for not being biologists.

  • QUOTES (5)

    • Jason: (after Andy says the stairs made his chest hurt) Ready for Satan to come out from the upstairs?
      Grant: Here goes. Crap, I'm not ready for this.
      Jason: I'll take him first.

    • Jason: (upon hearing of a case which involves children being awakened by flying toys) There's definitely cases that, uh, take precedence over others. If a child's involved, the case goes to the front of the list. You know, being a father, having five kids myself, the least thing you'd want to see is your child in jeopardy, psychological or physical.

    • Brian: I screw up still.
      Dustin: You do? I'd never believe it.
      Brian: Dude, I'm not a god. I'm only human, man.

    • Brian: Just to let you know, I don't go by the book.
      Dustin: Somehow I figured that.

    • EVP: Have them go.

  • NOTES (3)

    • This is the first episode in which Dustin Pari takes part in an investigation. He appeared briefly on screen in the previous episode as the TAPS members work on the new office, but does not speak on camera.

    • While examining the site of some alleged phenomena, Jason and Grant find what looks like a human vertebra and some other bones and send them to the police to be analyzed. During a later phone call in the episode they learn the bones were actually from pigs and cows, and not a human.

    • When Jason and Grant are in the basement at the Grafton house, Jason gets unexplained burn marks on his back.

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

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