Greg the Bunny

Season 1 Episode 1

Welcome to Sweetknuckle Junction

0
Aired Wednesday 7:30 PM Mar 27, 2002 on FOX
8.5
out of 10
User Rating
33 votes
3

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

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Welcome to Sweetknuckle Junction
AIRED:
Greg goes in for an assistant's job at Sweetknuckle Junction, and walks out with a starring role.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A hilarious pilot episode.

    8.5
    This is the premiere for what turned out to be one of the funniest short-lived sitcoms ever. The cult sensation Greg the Bunny begins here when Greg gets the starring role on Sweetknuckle Junction while looking for an assistants job. This episode is comedic brilliance in every way. It introduces all of the main characters in uniquely funny ways and they all make their mark immediately. This episode may be lacking some of the “randomly funny jokes” later episode have because it had a lot of plot to set up in just about 21 minutes, but the episode manages to remain funny throughout, a task most recent sitcoms fail at. So overall, this is a must see pilot episode for all fans of comedy.moreless
  • You thought all US TV shows were about Fabricated Americans? No! This is real story of sweet FA's...

    8.9
    Yep, as soon as you hear the title puppet character of this show, Greg The Bunny, refer to himself as a 'Fabricated American' you know this is something a little different. In this version of LA, puppets live alongside humans and represent an opressed minority (DVD outtakes show scenes of Greg struggling to get accepted for job interviews and being turfed out of taxis following demeaning namecalling - "sock" is a derogatory term to Fabricated Americans, so be careful who you this term around).

    Dejected with life, this ep finds Greg mooching home to flatmate human Jimmy and eventually, through family connections, stumbling his way into the starring role of his favourite TV show, a kiddies caper featuring a mad array of FAs (including Count Blah who hates being mistaken for that other famous FA Count on Sesame Street).

    The puppet humour here though is a long way from the educational capers of Sesame Street, or even The Muppet Show. This is more Meet The Feebles (early Peter Jackson film) and less Kermit The Frog - have you ever seen Kermit using flatulence in the bath as a punchline!!

    This debut ep sets up great characters and it's good to see Seth Green (as Jimmy) flexing his comedic muscles on screen (rather than the cartoon voice work he's taken too of late) and just as good to see Eugene Levy (as Jimmy's dad) on the small screen again (ahhh, remember Second City TV? anyone?).

    Of course, it's too good to be true and this is the first of only a short-lived 13 ep season. Yep, even the network suits are prejudiced against Fabricated Americans...moreless
  • Greg is a small bunny puppet who talked his friend into arranging an interview for a job at his favorite tv show. Mistaking him for an actor, they give him an audition and he becomes the new star.moreless

    6.4
    This is not a kids show. It's an adult show about the behind the scenes happens of recording a kids tv show in a world were humans and puppets (who prefer Fabricated-Americans) live together. Plenty of twisted humor and adult-only jokes.



    Seth Green plays Jimmy, Greg's human roommate, who ends up working with Greg at the show. Greg the bunny is cute and innocent from the start. A little bit hyper and naive, but sweet. He is told that if he can't handle the star role of the show it will be cancelled. A lot of stress for a small puppet who's never acted a day in his life before this. So he must learn to overcome this or loose a job and his favorite show.



    I had to see another episode after catching this one. Was sad that only 13 episodes made it to air.moreless
Seth Green (I)

Seth Green (I)

Jimmy Bender

Eugene Levy

Eugene Levy

Gil Bender

Sarah Silverman

Sarah Silverman

Alison Kaiser

Bob Gunton

Bob Gunton

"Junction" Jack Mars

Dina Waters

Dina Waters

Dottie Sunshine

Drew Massey

Drew Massey

Count Blah / Dr. Aben Mitchell / Gay Bear

David Spade

David Spade

Himself

Guest Star

James Murray

James Murray

Rochester Rabbit / Susan the Monster

Guest Star

Scott Johnson

Scott Johnson

Additional Performer

Guest Star

Victor Yerrid

Victor Yerrid

Tardy Turtle / Cranky

Recurring Role

Carl Bridge

Carl Bridge

Additional Performer

Recurring Role

Donna Kimball

Donna Kimball

Additional Performer

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (2)

    • In the scene where Jimmy goes to visit his dad's office where he reveals Greg is not an actor, Greg pops out the top of Jimmy's shirt. In a wide shot with Jimmy sitting down and facing the camera (looking towards his father) you can see a puppeteer's arm coming out the bottom of his shirt. It explains the uncomfortable position Jimmy is sitting in!

    • After Alison first discusses firing Rochester with Gil, he opens the door real wide to give her and her team of executives the cue to leave his office. After Alison says that the show will be cancelled if he doesn't fire Rochester, the door is far less open than it was in the previous shot.

  • QUOTES (20)

    • Jimmy: You okay?
      Greg: Sure, this place is filled with freaks. I'm gonna fit right in.

    • Blah: Rochester, my friend. Don't do it blah
      Rochester: Give me one good reason why I shouln't.
      Blah: Uh..prison rape.

    • Greg: That's it? Don't blow it. That's your best sho..uh, yeah wow, not since Vince Lombardi, has anyone gave such a rousing and inspirational speach, thanks Jim.

    • Jimmy: Okay, I'll tell you what. If..if you hire Greg back, I'll come work for ya.
      Gil: Wow! That's a sweet deal, I get not one, but two idiots.

    • Gil: Son, what kind of future do you think you have as a pool boy?
      Jimmy: I'm a pool man.

    • Tardy: Crayon's taste like purple.

    • Greg: So, puppets and humans may seem different, but, you know, in the end, we all want the same things. Love, acceptance, and... to luck our way into a cushy job that we really don't deserve.

    • Greg: Jimmy, you know how hard it is for me to get a job out there. I am sick of working one day a year on Easter.

    • Greg: Hey, Jimmy. Didja see what's on TV?
      Jimmy: What?
      Greg: Not me!

    • Gil: Alright, let me tell you something about television. I vouched for him to the network! Okay? I expressed an opinion! That's the kind of thing that ends careers in this business.

    • Greg: Sorry. It's just that, I mean, I--I love you! I--I've seen everything you've ever done! "Godspell," um, "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat"...
      Warren: Yes, well, if it was lame and about Jesus, I was there.

    • Greg: Wow. Count Blah, can I just say that you scared the piss out of me. And I mean that from the heart, sir.
      Blah: Please. You may call me Blah, blah.
      Greg: Okay. Blah Blah.
      Blah: No. Just Blah... blah.
      Greg: Just... Blah Blah.
      Blah: Blah! My boy, it is simple. Just Blah... blah.
      Greg: Just Blah... Blah.
      Blah: Look, don't turn this into a frickin' Abbott and Costello routine, okay? Just call me Blah, and leave it at that.

    • Greg:(Singing) Snowball, snowball, what do you do with snowfall? You ball it up, and make it stick, and then you hurl it like a brick. Snowball, you are my best friend. Snowball, your love never ends. Whether you are white or yellow, you are sure my favorite fellow. Snowball, I'm in love with you. Snowball, you complete me. Snowball, you make me rock my world.
      Alison: You're right. He's cute. He's quick. He does improv. He's like Robin Williams.
      Gil: Yeah. Only not as furry.

    • Gil: Yes, Warren. Uh, we're having a little casting session in here. We're, uh, thinking of making a small cast change.
      Warren: You spotty bastard! I give you the best years of my life, and this is how you repay me? Well, the joke's on you, you godless bloodsucker! I am an actor. Hmm-mm. Yes, I have range. And I don't need your insipid, little Moppet Show!
      Gil: I just want you to read with the other actors, Warren. We're replacing Rochester.
      Warren: Oh. Well, apparently, you do read the suggestion box.

    • Alison: I know that. I know that. I'm as sentimental as the next person, Gil. Trust me, I'm so sentimental. But his--his fur is thinning, and his ears are drooping, and it's gross. We--we need to find the next Elmo if we're gonna reach a younger audience.
      Gil: A younger audience? We already reach 4-year-olds. How young do you wanna go? Fetal?

    • Gil: Guys, guys, can we just try and get this right, because the new boss from the network is here.
      Dottie: Where'd she come from?
      Gil: PBS.
      Blah: Looks more like PMS, blah.

    • Gil: The, uh, the line, Rochester, is, "Can static electricity be used to light up a Christmas tree?"
      Rochester: Yeah, well, the only thing that's lit up is Warren.

    • Gil: Alright. Alright. Send your friend in, I'll see what I can do. But, Jimmy, I'm really worried about you, son. You know, I just read this article about children of highly successful fathers. And these kids, they sabotage their own futures, 'cause they can't compete with their father's, you know, brilliant accomplishments.
      Jimmy: You babysit actors on some lame kiddie show.

    • Greg: (voiceover) Fact: There are 3.2 million puppets -- or as we prefer to be called, Fabricated Americans -- currently residing in the United States. And, despite all of our many accomplishments, most people would still rather chamois their car with us than have us date their daughters. But, you know, I don't let it get me down. Hey, after all, you know, some of my best friends are humans.

    • Greg: Yeah, well, at least you have a job. It is impossible for a puppet to find work out there.
      Jimmy: Well, they're hiring at the arcade.
      Greg: Yeah. Dollar fifty an hour to be a whack-a-mole. I don't think so. You should see the guy I'd be replacing. Talks like Mohammed Ali.

  • NOTES (5)

    • The outtakes tag for this episode was not broadcast by FOX. It was replaced with a promo. In this show, one outtake is shown during the closing credits: Rochester Rabbit telling Warren a long story about how they fired him, to which Warren replies, "Yeah, I'm sorry. I totally drifted off on you."

    • The Hyperjinx Tricycle album Soft Skull Shortwave contains "Greg the Bunny," their bid for a theme song, which ended up rejected and replaced with the one we're all familiar with. (Among other things Shortwave contains is an ode to Matt Groening -- who drew some of the cover art -- and The Simpsons.) This was probably the basis for the title of frontman, Daniel Johnston's, previous album -- Rejected Unknown.

    • Speaking of Steven Levitan's other shows, this is the second premiere in a row of his to feature an animal humping a human's leg. Here, it's Greg the Bunny humping Alison's leg. In Stark Raving Mad, it's Edgar the dog humping Henry's (Neil Patrick Harris) leg.

    • David Spade of course starred on Steven Levitan's other show, Just Shoot Me.

    • Music: "Living for the City" by Stevie Wonder

  • ALLUSIONS (4)

    • Alison: We need to find the next Elmo if we're going to reach a younger audience.

      This is one of many Sesame Street references. Elmo is a furry red monster with an orange nose who hosts his own segment on Sesame Street.

    • Count Blah: Look, don't turn this in to a freakin' Abbott and Costello routine, okay?

      During the fifties, Abbott and Costello, of The Abbott and Costello Show, were known for their slap-stick humor routines.

    • Greg: Whatcha' talking 'bout, lady?

      This is a famous line from the sitcom Diff'rent Strokes.

    • Greg: ...not since Vince Lombardi has someone given such a rousing and inspirational speach...

      Vince Lombardi was the head coach of the Green Bay Packers from 1959 to 1967, and was well known for his pre-game speaches.

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