A Grimm Community
NBC (ended 2017)
Well, "Breakfast in Bed" wasn't as bad as last week. But it was a near thing. Part of it is because it had even less subplotting than "The Seven Year Itch." Renard's issues with Meisner take up about five minutes. Admittedly, there's no mention of Renard's visit to the "spirit vacuum" last week, and it doesn't seem to have had any impact on anything, hallucinated or real.

Also, "Breakfast in Bed" is the place to go if you want not-so-exciting discussion of ancient constellations. Because, boy, is there a lot of it. These scenes drag on... and on... and on. All to tell us that something is going to happen on March 24, 2017. Which is the night an episode of Grimm will premiere. So expect big(ger) things on 3/24/17.


There's no Diana, so minus points for leaving out the creepy kid. I don't like the demi-child myself, but at least she brings a certain Village of the Damned-like ambience to the show. That also means that there's no Claire Coffee. Admittedly, Adalind really hasn't had anything to do this episode except cast a spell that ultimately accomplished nothing. But we're on the "final chapter." Isn't that an all-hands-on-deck type of situation? Shouldn't it be that kind of situation?

What about the main plot? It's pretty standard Murderous Wesen of the Week. A nutcase, Dan, runs out of his hotel room and beats a man on the street to death. When Nick and Hank question him, they eventually discover that a new one-and-done Wesen, an Alpe, has been feeding on the guy's melatonin. Dan then disappears from the episode, even though he should be innocent by reason of insanity. Which is caused by seeing a Wesen in its natural form. But don't go looking for backstories or further information on minor characters, even Skinny Pete (Dan Wells) from Breaking Bad. Unless it's information on ancient constellations.


Monroe identifies the Alpe (again), and has a connection to it (again). There are several suspects, including one named "Herring." He literally turns into a red herring Wesen at the end for absolutely no reason, which is... stunning in its audacity. Or elegant in its simplicity. Or something. Congratulations to writer Kyle McVey for literally rubbing the viewers' noses in the joke.


Nick and Hank use Monroe as bait (again). After Rosalee shoots hubby up with melatonin, he gets a room at the hotel and dozes off. The Alpe feeds on the melatonin in heavy sleepers after paralyzing them, and the lack of sleep drives the victims to la la land. Another guest has already checked in but is never checking out.

The Alpe comes in through a hidden passage that the detectives somehow failed to find when they were investigating the locked-and-sealed-from-the-inside rooms earlier. Which is mildly funny, because MacGyver on tonight's MacGyver rigs up a device to do the same thing in 30 seconds. They find the manager and it turns out he's a Hundjager. We have no idea why he's at the hotel or if he's connected to the killer. Nick thoughtfully breaks his neck and goodbye Captain Jonas from Stargate SG-1's "The First Commandment".


Then they go back into the passageways and find the Alpe: who is the owner of the hotel, Beverly. Earlier Nick called her and believed he was calling a 213 number. Which... shouldn't he know better? Don't the police check that kind of thing? And what kind of money does Beverly have to buy that kind of phone number rerouting? Anyhoo, it turns out Beverly has been living at the dive hotel for some reason or another in the lap of luxury in a hidden suite. She then goes out and preys on the guests, and has apparently been doing this for 50+ years. Whether she's long-lived or comes from a line of Alpes who used the hotel for feeding purposes or what, we never find out.

Nick gets all Grimm on her and tells her to either sell her hotel and move out of Portland, or he'll kill her. Beverly opts for the former but then tries to kill Nick anyway. He trips her and she cracks her skull open on a table, and conveniently dies. No muss, no fuss. And I wonder where Nick & Company dump the bodies of all the Wesen that they've killed. Somewhere in Portland there must be a mass grave filled with skeletons.


And that's it except for the old guy in the wheelchair, "Charles Herring Link", who has been sitting around remaining silent the whole time looking ominous. He woges into a red herring Wesen and laughs a lot. Back at the spice shop, Eve (who keeps acting more Juliette-ish all the time) and Rosalee decipher the symbols and realize that they indicate a date, 3/24/17 as noted. And that's it.

Oh, and Renard gets a visit from Black Claw rep Anselmo Baledin. Renard shows him the door and that triggers an assassination attempt that Meisner helps Renard thwart. Meisner disappears--rather like his accent has been disappearing on and off--and that's the end of that subplot? I don't know.


So basically it's your typical episode of Grimm. We don't even see The Stick or the Shroud of Curin'. We just keep hearing about the symbols. Over and over and over again, and how long has that whole Crusaders/Stick/Shroud subplot been going on, anyway? It seems like forever. And like Zeno's Dichotomy Paradox, we never get to the end. We just keep getting half as close.

So overall it's a pretty standard WotW Grimm, with some padding tossed in with constellation analysis. Wu and Renard are barely in it, and Hank seems to be the designated sardonic/funny guy in Wu's near absence. If you expect to see more on the "final chapter," forget it.

But that's just my opinion, I could be wrong. What do you think?

-----

On 2/24/17, series two of Stan Lee's Lucky Man starts. What does this have to do with Grimm?

a) You really should be watching it. Assuming you can find the British series in America, or Canada, or online, or somewhere. If nothing else, it's mostly a police procedural with a supernatural element. So if you like that kind of thing... And if you don't, why are you watching Grimm?

b) No mention of constellations.

c) I'm already doing three shows on Friday nights, and reviewing all three. A fourth show could break me. So next week might be my last Grimm review. I'm going to try to squeeze in reviews, but there's... six more Grimm episodes starting on 2/24, and there'll be a Lucky Man episode and review each night as well. And real life intrudes. Grimm reviews are my lowest priority at this point. It's hard to work up much enthusiasm for the show when the producers don't seem too enthused about it.

d) No mention of constellations!

e) It stars James Nesbitt, a god among actors.


f) No mention of constellations!

But if anyone else wants to write reviews, feel free. All that fame and fortune can be yours!*

* Disclaimer: writing community reviews for tv.com does not bring you fame and fortune.
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Feb 11, 2017
You can't bow out now @Gislef when we're so close to the finish line! Not fair! :P Well. if this is the last Grimm review from you then I appreciate you writing them, so thank you.

It was Charles Baker aka Skinny Pete on Breaking Bad btw.

I think the most exciting thing was the drip feed of finding out the symbols are a calendar portending the penultimate episode.

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Feb 12, 2017
Oh, Ii'll at least do a review next week, since Lucky Man doesn't start until 2/24.

And I'll probably keep doing Grimm reviews. Most likely I won't watch Lucky Man until Saturday night. Right now I watch Grimm at 5 am and write up a review right after. (I work third shift on Fridays). Problem is I have a conference on 2/24-26 and a vacation on 3/10.-12 Which means I have to watch and write while on the road, or at some godawful hour of the morning. It's not ideal conditions.
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Feb 12, 2017
Phew! One more. :)
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Feb 12, 2017
At least.
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Feb 12, 2017
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