Hannah Montana

Season 2 Episode 5

I Am Hannah, Hear Me Croak

1
Aired Sunday 7:30 PM Apr 27, 2007 on Disney Channel
SUBMIT REVIEW

Episode Fan Reviews (27)

8.9
out of 10
Average
173 votes
  • Perfect

    10
    miley fears having surgery done on her throat because she fears she may not be able to be hannah montana anymore. a dream of her mother happens and she changes her mind.

    it was great, the dream in the episode is one of my favorite scenes for emotion, and the overall episode was very well done, and although it was not the funniest of the series, it was pretty good and i really wanted to just see what would happen, my overall grade for this great episode is an A+, just perfect in every way. A really great episode i think
  • Miley looses her voice reoccuringly and needs surgery.

    5.8
    Yay? Who really cares if she looses her voice. Many hollywood celebrities do because they can't shut their mouths for 10 seconds. ;D This episode is filled with a bunch of bad montages and dreams. I didn't like the fact that the effects departments didn't put anything around the screen for the dreams, because it made it hard to tell what was reality or just someone's dozing imagination. Overall, it was pretty much just a filler for the 30 minutes or so that Hannah Montana goes on the air.
  • Now, I may not like this show much, but this is one of the really good episodes!

    8.5
    Wow, this one was actually very good! Hannah us performing live, and the next day she finds her voice is all croaky, and she can't sing properly. A doctor sees to it, and says he cannot sing. Miley has to go one whole week (I think) without talking, and she finds herself fully cured afterwards. I THINK it's before this happens: Miley is visited by her mother in a dream, where Miley is treated sort of like Cinderella, and her mother calms her down, and says everything will be fine. It's something roughly like that. You can't blame me for not getting it exactly right. I haven't seen it in about 10/11 months or so. Overall, I'll give this episode a:

    Grade B
    8.5/10

    Good episode. Really was.
  • Lessons on how to make a good dream sequence (minor spoilers)

    9.6
    I am just gonna say that this is a lovely episode of Hannah Montana. As everybody knows she losses her voice and she is very worried about this (the situation is more complicated than everybody believes at the begging and that was a very good plot element); and thanks to a lot of sugar she has a dream about her mother. This dream is fantastic. Brooke Shields make a very good casting as her mother, and you can see a lot of Miley's not-so-high self-esteem and a lot of her insecurities. That was cool, because you can see how this aspects of her personality have affected her relationships (with Lilly, for example) in the past, so I think the way she looks at her friends and family in her dream is coherent with the way sometimes she looks at them when she is wake. It is a wild ride through Miley's mind and I enjoy that a lot.
    Finally, I find kind of sad the dream: clearly every member of the Stwart family misses their mother and wife a lot, but it is also pleasent to realise that they never forget her.
    So, overall, a great episode.
  • Hannah can't sing anymore!

    9.1
    In this episode, Miley looses her voice after a singing concert and she soon learns she has to get surgery. I would like to say I really enjoyed this episode. Like, when it started and Jackson and his Dad were singing. Also, Miley's voice was hillarious too. I also liked it when Oliver was flirting with the guy for Miley. That was hillarious. And when Miley wrote down something rude on the board, that was so funny. I also laughed when Jackson was dancing with the table. I laughed when the doctor was telling Miley she was going to need surgery and she was freaking out. And when Jackson was telling Miley the worst thing that could happen, that was funny too. The dream, though, was the best part. In conclusion, I loved this episode.
  • I really liked this episode.

    9.2
    Miley loses her voice one night during a concert. She goes a week without talking and just uses a whiteboard. I loved Oliver's line...
    Oliver: Wow, a week without talking. You know, that's gotta be tough for a girl. Now guys, we're different. I don't need to talk. I could not talk for a month and it wouldn't bother me at all. But girls? Talk, talk, talk, talk, talk, talk, talk, "Hey, Sally, nice capris." "Oh, I love your purse." (Reads what Miley wrote on the whiteboard) Oh, now that's just rude. Miley finds out that she has to have throat surgery. She's scared that she may never be able to sing again. Miley has a dream about her mom. Her family and friends reassure her in her dream that she will be ok and they would still love her even if she wasn't Hannah Montana anymore.
  • I thought this was a great episode. To tell the truth, I don't think it's as sad as everyone says it was.

    10
    I thought this was a great episode. To tell the truth, I don't think it's as sad as everyone says it was. Even though Miley's deceased mom steps in, I actually thought this episode was pretty funny, especially in the first segment when Lilly, Oliver and Jackson were saying stupid things to try and translate what she's trying to say or try to read what she wrote. (Betty Burg's Address. Lol!)

    And I think Brooke Shields did a good job of playing Miley's mom. She's a talented actress. I also heard she was on That 70's Show as Jackie's mom.

    I wish they could have mentioned how Miley's mom died (or at least her first name for that matter) but it was still a great episode. 10/10.
  • in this episode miley has singing problems

    9.6
    in this episode miley has singing problems , she losses her voice after a big concert.
    miley tries to not talk for a whole week so she will b ready for her next concert which gets her in some very funny and embarassing situations thanks to her best friends lilly and oliver who talk for her. after a week miley can talk and sing again but this does not last long, during a concert miley losses her voice again , this time she see's a docor about her problem the doctor tells her that she will need surgery which freaks miley out.

    miley then has a dream on what she belives her life would b like if she couldnt sing anymore, this includes lossing her friends and become the house slave and lossing the love of her father and brother. also during this dream we see miley's dead mother for the first time, her mother makes her see that her life would stil be good if she was not hannah montana and reasures her about the surgery

    ovel all this a funny and sad episode

    i highly reccomend it!!
  • There was so much that they could have done with this storyline. Therefore I'm kind of dissapointed with this episode. WARNING: SPOILERS MAY FOLLOW!

    8.0
    I am Hannah, Hear Me Croak had a good plot line and had some funny moments, but I was disappointed in one thing. The story line for this episode had great potential, but I do not think that the script was as good as it should have been. I think that everyone was in character, which was good. I also, think that most of the jokes were good, but I also think that some of the humour was not as good. I really liked the way Oliver acted in this episode, he was really funny when he was contridicting himself. If you don't get freaked out by surgery, which I do, then you may like this episode. I really think that the writers can do better.
  • I nearly cried in this one!!!

    8.8
    Spells in Harry Potter
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search This article or section has multiple issues: It may contain original research or unverifiable claims. Tagged since August 2007.

    It needs additional references or sources for verification. Tagged since August 2007.

    It may fail to make a clear distinction between fact and fiction. Please edit according to the fiction guidelines. Tagged since August 2007.

    It may need copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. Tagged since August 2007.

    It describes a work or element of fiction in a primarily in-universe style that may require cleanup. Tagged since August 2007. Please help improve the article or discuss these issues on the talk page. In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series of books by author JK Rowling, magic spells are used by many of the characters to achieve useful effects without the benefit of modern technology. The main depiction of a "spell" in the Harry Potter books consists of a gesture made with the character's wand, combined with a spoken or mental incantation. In the books and their associated film series, the majority of these incantations are derived from the Classical languages, particularly Latin[1]. These named incantations are not grammatically correct in any language; most spoken phrases resemble Latin words of appropriate meaning, but are not exactly Latin themselves.

    In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, the concept of casting spells non-verbally is introduced. Prior to this, every spell cast by the principal characters had been accompanied by the appropriate incantation (although advanced adult practitioners of magic had been described casting non-verbal spells in previous books). Consequently, the incantations used for some spells introduced in Half-Blood Prince and its sequel Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows are not known canonically.

    Spells are listed here by their incantation (when known), with their vernacular name in parentheses. Some spells have no known incantation – the only canonical reference is by an informal name, either because in its only appearance in the relevant book it was cast non-verbally, or because it was never depicted in the books, only talked about. The majority of spells cast in duels between adult characters in all seven books appear non-verbally; such spells can only be identified by their effects.

    Contents A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A

    Accio (Summoning Charm)
    Pronunciation: Various suggestions have been made: ['ɑkkio] (AK-ee-o) - classical Latin (film) ['ɑksio] (AK-see-o) - (audiobook) ['æsio] (AH-see-o) - (Scholastic) English Description: This charm summons an object to the caster, potentially over a significant distance[2]. Seen/Mentioned: First mentioned in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry summons his broom to complete the First Task of the Triwizard TournamentGF Ch.20. Later in the same book Harry summons a Portkey he can't reach to escape from the Battle in the Graveyard. Also seen in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to try to summon Horcruxes, and Harry even tries to summon a falling HagridDH Ch.4. Suggested Etymology: The Latin word accio means "I call" or "I summon".[3] (Age-Line Spell)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Creates a line that is impassable by people below a set age. Seen/Mentioned: Seen only in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Albus Dumbledore cast this spell to stop underage students from placing their names into the Goblet of FireGF Ch.16. Aguamenti
    Pronunciation: AH-gwa-MEN-tee or AG-YOO-A-menti (IPA: /a.gwə.'mɛn.ti/) Description: Produces a jet of water from the witch or wizard's wand. Seen/Mentioned: First named in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Harry casts this spell in an attempt to create a drink of water for Dumbledore after drinking Voldemort's potionHBP Ch.26, and later to douse Hagrid's hut after it is set on fireHBP Ch.28. Hermione uses it in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to put out Mundungus's searing eyebrows. Shown again in the same book in an attempt to douse Vincent Crabbe's Fiendfyre curse. Alohomora
    Pronunciation: AL-lo-ha-MOR-ah (IPA: /ə'lo.həˌmo.ɹə/) Description: Used to open and unlock doors[4]. It is not effective on doors bewitched to resist this spell. Seen/Mentioned: Used throughout the series, first shown used by Hermione Granger in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone on the third floor corridor door in HogwartsPS Ch.9. Anapneo
    Pronunciation: ah-NAP-nee-oh (IPA: /ə.'næp.ni.əʊ/) Description: Clears the target's airway, if blocked. Seen/Mentioned:Shown in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Horace Slughorn casts this spell on Marcus Belby when the latter begins to chokeHBP Ch.7. (Anti-Cheating Spell)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Cast on parchment to prevent the writer from cheating while writing answers. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix as being cast on quills and exam papers near exam times at HogwartsPS Ch.16. (Anti-Disapparition Jinx)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Used to prevent Disapparition in an area for a time. Presumably can be used to prevent an enemy from entering a defended area, or used to trap an enemy in an area. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, used by Albus Dumbledore to trap several Death Eaters in the Department of MysteriesOP Ch.36. Also cast long ago on Hogwarts, the reason why (As Hermione quotes innumerable times throughout the series) "No one can apparate or disapparate inside the [Hogwarts] grounds." (Antonin Dolohov's Curse)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: This curse causes serious internal injury, but does not show any external symptoms. It is described as cast with "a slashing motion", sending out a streak of purple flames. Seen/Mentioned: Seen only in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, this spell is cast three times by Antonin Dolohov during the battle between the Death Eaters and members of Dumbledore's Army at the Ministry of Magic. All three times it is shown cast non-verbally, although one time this was due to Dolohov having previously been hit by the Silencing Charm and hence unable to speak. Notes: It is revealed that this curse is less effective than it would have been had Dolohov was able to say the incantation aloud. Aparecium
    Pronunciation: AH-par-EE-see-um (IPA: /æ.pə'ɹi.si.ʌm/) Description: This spell makes invisible ink appear. Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, when Hermione Granger tries to make hidden writing appear in Tom Marvolo Riddle's diaryCS Ch.13. Notes: See also Specialis Revelio. (Atmospheric Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Modifies or affects the weather. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned only in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows as a possible cause of the rain inside Yaxley's office at the Ministry. Avada Kedavra (Killing Curse)
    Main article: Unforgivable Curses
    Pronunciation: uh-VAH-dah kuh-DAHV-rah (IPA: /ə.'væ.də kə.'dæv.ɹə/) Description: One of the three "Unforgivable Curses". Causes instant, painless death, and leaves no physical signs of cause of death. There is no described counter-curse or blocking spell, but it is shown that the spell can be blocked by physical coverOP Ch.36, and the caster is still required to aim to hit the target. Described effects include a flash of green lightGF Ch.14 and a rushing sound, similar to an oncoming high-speed objectGF Ch.1. Seen/Mentioned: Throughout the series. This was the spell described as used to kill Harry Potter's parents. Lord Voldemort is shown to kill many people with this curse. Suggested Etymology: From the Aramaic אבדא כדברא avada kedavra, translated as "I destroy as I speak" or Let the thing be destroyed.[5] Avis
    Pronunciation: AH-vis (IPA: /a'vɪs/) Description: This charm creates a flock of birds which pour forth from the caster's wand. When coupled with Oppugno, it can be used offensively. Seen/Mentioned: Shown in Harry Potter and The Goblet of Fire, cast by Mr Ollivander to test Viktor Krum's wandGF Ch.18. In Harry Potter and the Half-blood Prince, it is cast by Hermione, followed by Oppugno which causes the birds to attack Ron Weasley.HBP Ch.14 B

    (Bat-Bogey Hex)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Grotesquely enlarges the target's bogies (British slang for nasal mucus), gives them wings, and sets them attacking the target. Seen/Mentioned: Ginny Weasley is depicted as an accomplished caster of this particular spellOP Ch.6. She is shown to use it in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix on Draco MalfoyOP Ch.33, and in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince on Zacharias SmithHBP Ch.7.[6] (Bedazzling Hex)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Similar to a Disillusionment Charm, it can be used to conceal a person or an object. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned only in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by Xenophilius Lovegood. Never cast in canon. Notes: Is used to make invisibility cloaks. (Bubble-Head Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Puts a large bubble of air around the head of the user. Used as a magical equivalent of a breathing set. Seen/Mentioned: in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Cedric Diggory and Fleur Delacour use this charm underwater in the second task of the Triwizard TournamentGF Ch.26. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, it is described as used by many Hogwarts students when walking through the hallways, because of the bad smells caused by the various pranks played on Dolores UmbridgeOP Ch.30. C

    (Caterwauling Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Anyone entering the perimeter of a Caterwauling Charm sets off a high-pitched shriek. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, cast by Death Eaters over Hogsmeade to protect against intruders.DH Ch.28 Cave Inimicum
    Pronunciation: KAH-vay ih-nih-MEE-sum (IPA: /ˈkæ.ve ɪ.ˈnɪ.mɪ.kʌm/) Description: Spell used to strengthen an enclosure from enemies. Seen/Mentioned: Shown only in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, cast by Hermione and Harry to strengthen their campsites' defencesDH Ch.22. (Cheering Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Causes the person upon whom the spell was cast to become happy and contented, though heavy-handedness with the spell may cause the person to break into an uncontrollable laughing fit. Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.PA Ch.15 Colloportus
    Pronunciation: cul-loh-POR-tus (IPA: /kɔ.lo.ˈpɔ˞.təs/) Description: Magically locks a door, preventing it from being opened by Muggle means.[7] Seen/Mentioned: First in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, cast by Hermione in the Department of Mysteries. Notes: This spell functions as the counterspell to Alohomora (Colour-Change Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown. A highly unlikely incantation is attempted by Ron Weasley in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's StonePS Ch.6. Description: Changes an object's colour. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned in Harry's Ordinary Wizarding Levels in Harry Potter and the Order of the PhoenixOP Ch.31. Confringo (Blasting Curse)
    Pronunciation: con-FRIN-goh (hard "g") or con-FRIN-joh (IPA: /kʌn.ˈfɹɪŋ.gəʊ/ or /kʌn.ˈfɹɪn.dʒəʊ/) Description: Causes anything that the spell comes into contact with to explode. Seen/Mentioned: Seen only in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. In the opening chapters, it is cast by Harry to destroy the side-car of the flying motorbikeDH Ch.4. Later, used by Hermione in an attempt to kill Nagini and facilitate an escape from Bathilda Bagshot's house in Godric's HollowDH Ch.17. Confundo (Confundus Charm)
    Pronunciation: con-FUN-doh (IPA: /kʌn.ˈfʌn.dəʊ/) Description: Causes the victim to become confused and befuddled. Seen/Mentioned: First mentioned in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, when Severus Snape suggests that Harry and Hermione had been Confunded to believe Sirius Black's claim to innocencePA Ch.21. In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, it is suggested that the Confundus Charm is responsible for the Goblet choosing a fourth Triwizard contestantGF Ch.17. It is first seen in action when Hermione Granger uses it on Cormac McLaggen during Quidditch tryouts in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood PrinceHBP Ch.11. The Confundus Charm is used several times in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and is mentioned in the epilogue by the adult Ron Weasley as the means used to pass his Muggle driving exam. (Conjunctivitus Curse)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: A curse that affects the victim's vision. Seen/Mentioned: It is suggested by Sirius Black in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire as a means for defeating a dragon for the first task of the Triwizard Tournament, and used by Viktor Krum for this purposeGF Ch.19, 20. Mentioned in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix as cast by Madame Maxime against giantsOP Ch.20. Crucio (Cruciatus Curse)
    Main article: Unforgivable Curses
    Pronunciation: KROO-see-oh (IPA: /ˈkɹu.si.əʊ/) Description: Inflicts intense pain on the recipient of the curse. One of the three Unforgivable Curses.[8] Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when it is demonstrated on a spider during a "class demonstration" in a Defence Against the Dark Arts lectureGF Ch.14. Used thereafter throughout the series by the Death Eaters and (on two occasions) Harry OP Ch.36DH Ch.30. Characters known to have been subject to this curse include HarryGF Ch.34, HermioneDH Ch.23 and NevilleOP Ch.36. (Cushioning Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Creates an invisible cushioned area. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned in Quidditch Through the Ages, cast on broomsticks to provide a more comfortable ride. Shown in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, used to cushion Harry, Ron, and Hermione's fall in Gringotts. D

    Defodio (Gouging Spell)
    Pronunciation: deh-FOH-dee-oh (IPA: dɛ.ˈfəʊ.di.əʊ/) Description: This spell causes deep gouges to appear in the object targeted by the spell.[9] Seen/Mentioned: Cast by the three lead characters in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to help dig their way out of the Gringotts TunnelsDH Ch.26. Deletrius
    Pronunciation: deh-LEE-tree-us (IPA: /də.'li.tɹi.əs/) Description: An erasure spell. It erases images and magical "after-effects".[9] Seen/Mentioned: Seen only in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Amos Diggory gets rid of the echo of the Dark Mark from Harry's wandGF Ch.9. Densaugeo
    Pronunciation: den-sah-OO-jee-oh /dɛn.'sɔ.dʒi.əʊ/) Description: This hex makes the victim's teeth grow rapidly.[9] Seen/Mentioned: Seen only in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, cast by Draco Malfoy on Harry, which is deflected onto HermioneGF Ch.18. Descendo
    Pronunciation: deh-SEN-doh (IPA: /dɛ.ˈsɛn.dəʊ/) Description: The spell likely causes any targeted object to move downwards.[9] Seen/Mentioned: Seen twice in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, It is cast by Ron to magically cause the stairs in his room to descendDH Ch.6, and later by Crabbe in the Room of Hidden Things to lower the wall behind which Ron is hidingDH Ch.31. Deprimo
    Pronunciation: DEH-prih-moh. Description: This spell places immense downward pressure upon its target, which may result in the violent fracturing of said target. [9] Seen/Mentioned: Introduced in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows when Hermione blasts a hole through a living room floorDH Ch.21. Diffindo (Severing Charm)
    Pronunciation: dif-FIN-doh (IPA: /dɪ.'fɪn.dəʊ/) Description: Tears the target or a specific area on the target.[9] Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Harry urgently wants to talk to Cedric Diggory he casts this spell to rip his bag, delaying him for classGF Ch.9. Also shown several times in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, for cutting ropesDH Ch.9, chainsDH Ch.13, etc. Suggested Etymology: Latin diffindo, "I divide."[3] Dissendium
    Pronunciation: dis-EN-dee-um (IPA: /dɪ.'sɛn.di.əm/) Description: Causes the statue of the humpbacked witch hiding the secret passage to Honeydukes to open up.[9]PA Ch.10 Seen/Mentioned: Seen only in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. (Disillusionment Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Causes the target to become able to change colour to match their background, effectively hiding them without making them invisible.[9] Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Alastor Moody casts this charm on HarryOP Ch.3, 4. Also mentioned in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince in a Ministry of Magic leaflet. Xenophilius Lovegood mentions, in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, that invisibility cloaks are sometimes created by casting a disillusionment charm on a regular cloakDH Ch.21. Notes: The described sensation of being the subject of a Disillusionment charm is of feeling "something cold and wet trickling down [your] back". When the charm is lifted, the subject feels something hot trickling down their back.OP Ch.3, 4 Duro
    Pronunciation: DOO-roh (IPA: /ˈdu.ɹəʊ/) Description: Turns its target to stone.[9] Seen/Mentioned: Seen in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, cast by Hermione Granger while escaping from Death Eaters in HogwartsDH Ch.32. E

    Engorgio (Engorgement Charm)
    Pronunciation: en-GOR-jee-oh (IPA: /ɪn.'gɔ˞.dʒi.əʊ/) Description: Causes objects to swell in size. Seen/Mentioned: A "Growth Charm" with the same effect is briefly mentioned. Seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Barty Crouch, Jr, impersonating Professor Moody, casts it on a spider to enhance a demonstration of the effects of the Cruciatus Curse. Hagrid is suspected of having performed the charm on his pumpkinsCS Ch.7, and Ron Weasley suggested it might be the cause of Hagrid's abnormal size before learning that he is half-giant. Cast on a spider by Harry in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Suggested Etymology: The English word engorged means "distended" or "swollen" by way of Old French engorgier[5] Episkey
    Pronunciation: eh-PIS-key (IPA: /ɛpɪ'ski/) Description: Used to heal relatively minor injuries. When this spell is cast, the person feels their injuried body part go very hot and then very cold. Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire after the first task of the Triwizard Tournament. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Nymphadora Tonks uses this spell to fix Harry's broken nose; also used by Harry in the same book to fix Demelza Robins' mouth. Notes: Rowling writes in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince that Harry's knowledge tells him this spell could belong to a family (or variety) of Healing Spells, in the same way a species of plants belongs to a larger genus. Erecto
    Pronunciation: ee-RECK-toh or eh-RECK-toh (IPA: /ɪ.ˈɹɛk.təʊ/ or /ə.ˈɹɛk.təʊ/) Description: Used to erect a tent or other structure. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione and Harry to construct shelter for themselves and Ron in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Evanesco (Vanishing Spell)
    Pronunciation: ev-an-ES-koh (IPA: (IPA: /ɛ.vn̩.'ɛs.kəʊ/) Description: Makes something vanish. Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by Professor Snape to make Harry's potions disappear from his cauldron. In addition, when Fred and George were showing off their puking pastilles, Lee Jordan cleared the bucket of vomit with the Evanesco spell. Also, during their stay at #12, Grimmauld Place, Bill uses this on a stack of documents. This suggests that Vanished objects can be recovered. Notes: According to Professor McGonagall, in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Vanished objects and organisms go "into non-being, which is to say, everything." This was McGonagall's response to the question, "Where do vanished objects go?" from the door knocker at Ravenclaw Tower. Expecto Patronum (Patronus Charm)
    Pronunciation: ecks-PEK-toh pah-TRO-num (IPA: /ɛks.'pɛk.təʊ pə.'trəʊ.nʌm/)[10] Description: The Patronus Charm is a defensive spell used to conjure an incarnation of the Witch's or Wizard's innermost positive emotions to act as a protector. It can also be used to send messages. Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, when Remus Lupin made the Dementor on the train disappear, though seen without the incantation noticed. Lupin later teaches Harry Potter to use the charm as a defence against Dementors. Suggested Etymology: See Patronus Charm article. Expelliarmus
    Pronunciation: ex-pel-ee-AR-mus (IPA: /ɛks.ˌpɛ.li.'a˞.mɪs/)[10] Description: This spell is used to disarm another wizard, typically by causing the victim's wand to fly out of reach[8][11]. It can also throw the target backwards when enough power is put into it. As demonstrated in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, simultaneous use of this spell by multiple witches or wizards on a single person can throw the wizard back with much greater force. Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, when Professor Snape disarms Professor Lockhart in the Dueling Club. It is then used commonly throughout the rest of the series. Draco Malfoy uses it to disarm Albus Dumbledore and Harry uses it in the final battle against Voldemort wielding the Elder Wand. It is seen by the Death Eaters as Harry's signature spell. Expulso
    Pronunciation: ecks-PUL-soh (IPA: /ɛks.ˈpʊl.səʊ/) Description: A curse which causes that with which it comes into contact to explode violently. Similar to the Blasting Curse, which also causes its target to explode. Seen/Mentioned: Used by a Death Eater in an attempt to capture Harry. In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, this may have been the spell that caused a segment of wall to fall and kill Fred Weasley. F

    Ferula
    Pronunciation: feh-ROO-lah (IPA: /fɛ.'ɹu.lə/) Description: Creates a bandage and a splint. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Remus Lupin in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban to bind Ron's broken leg. (Fidelius Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown (presumably 'fidelius') Description: a charm involving secret information hidden within the soul of a Secret-Keeper. This information is irretrievable until the Secret-Keeper chooses to reveal it; those who have the secret revealed to them cannot reveal it to others. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, it is explained that when Harry was an infant, he and his parents, James and Lily Potter, were hidden from Lord Voldemort by this charm. Later, in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, the charm is used to hide the location of the headquarters for the Order of the Phoenix. It is mentioned in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, used to protect the location of Shell Cottage and the Weasleys' Aunt Muriel's house. Notes: Rowling previously stated that when a Secret-Keeper dies, the Secret they held can never be revealed to anyone else; the people who were told before the Secret-Keeper's death will still know the secret, but after the death of the Secret-Keeper no one new can be brought into the circle of knowledge.[12] However, in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, it is explained that upon the Keeper's death, all those who have been told the secret become Secret-Keepers in turn, and can pass the secret on to others. (Fiendfyre)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Fiendfyre is a seemingly unstoppable cursed fire, the flames of which take the shape of fantastic creatures that pursue those caught in its path. It is shown to be capable of destroying Horcruxes. Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows when Crabbe, Goyle, and Draco Malfoy corner Harry in the Room of Hidden Things (one form of the Room of Requirement). Crabbe casts Fiendfyre, which become flaming beasts that pursue Harry, Ron, and Hermione and devour every object within the Room, including Crabbe and the Horcrux within the diadem. Notes: Hermione notes that she was aware that Fiendfyre could potentially destroy a Horcrux but that she never considered using it for that purpose because it was too dangerous. Finite (Incantatem) (Counter-Spell)
    Pronunciation: fi-NEE-tay (in-can-TAH-tem) (IPA: /fɪ.'ni.teɪ (ɪn.kn̩.'tæ.dm)̩/) Description: Negates spells or the effects of spells. Seen/Mentioned: Professor Snape uses it in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets to restore order in the Dueling Club when Harry and Draco are duelling. Remus Lupin uses the short form "Finite" in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Hermione suggests to Ron to attempt to use this spell to stop it raining in Yaxley's office. Harry used Finite to counter Crabbe's Descendo attack on Ron in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. (Flagrante Curse)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Causes any object affected to burn human skin when touched. Seen/Mentioned: Seen in the Lestranges' vault in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, as a criminal deterrent. Flagrate
    Pronunciation: fluh-GRAYT, FLAH-grayt, fluh-GRAH-tay (IPA: /flə.ˈɡɹæ.te/ Description: With this spell, the caster's wand can leave fiery marks. Seen/Mentioned: Cast by Hermione in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix to identify doors of the Department of Mysteries which members of Dumbledore's Army had already opened, by marking them with an 'X'. Notes: A similar spell is used non-verbally by Tom Marvolo Riddle in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, to write his name in midair. (Flame-Freezing Charm)
    Pronunciation:Unknown Description: Causes fire to become harmless to those caught in it, creating only a gentle, tickling sensation instead of burns. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned in the first chapter of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban as used by witches and wizards during medieval burnings. (Flying Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Cast on broomsticks, and (presumably) magic carpets to make them fly. Seen/Mentioned: Draco Malfoy mentioned this spell when tauntingly asking Ron Weasley why would anyone cast a Flying Charm on Ron's broomstick in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix during Ron's first Quidditch practice. It is also mentioned in Quidditch Through the Ages. Notes: See Quidditch. Furnunculus
    Pronunciation: fer-NUN-kyoo-lus Description: Causes the target to become covered in boils. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Harry Potter in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire on Draco Malfoy, but was deflected onto Goyle instead. Suggested Etymology: Latin furunculus, a type of boil.[5] G

    Geminio
    Pronunciation: jeh-MIH-nee-oh or geh-MIH-nee-oh (hard "g") (IPA: /dʒə.ˈmɪ.ni.əʊ/ or /ɡə.ˈmɪ.ni.əʊ/) Description: Creates a duplicate of any object cast upon. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to copy Salazar Slytherin's locket in order to hide their tracks from Dolores Umbridge. (Gemino Curse)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Whenever an object affected by this curse is touched, it duplicates itself into many useless copies to hide the original. Seen/Mentioned: Seen in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows when Harry, Ron, Hermione, and Griphook the goblin break into the Lestrange vault in Gringotts. Glisseo
    Pronunciaton: GLISS-see-oh or gliss-SAY-oh (IPA: /ˈɡlɪs.si.əʊ/ or /ɡlɪs.ˈse.əʊ/) Description: Causes the steps on a stairway to flatten and form a ramp or slide. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione to escape from pursuing Death Eaters in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. (Gripping Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Used to help someone grip something with more effectiveness. This charm is placed upon Quaffles to help Chasers carry the Quaffle whilst simultaneously holding their brooms. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned in Quidditch Through the Ages. Notes: See Quidditch. H

    (Hair-Thickening Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Thickens one's hair. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Severus Snape asserts that Alicia Spinnet used it on her eyebrows even though she was obviously hexed by a member of the Slytherin Quidditch team. (Hex Deflection)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Deflects spells. Seen/Mentioned: Professor Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is mentioned to have given the class a lesson in it. Homenum Revelio
    Pronunciation: HOM-eh-num reh-VEH-lee-oh (IPA: /ˈhɔ.mɛ.nʌm ɹə.ˈvɛ.li.əʊ/ Description: Reveals humans in the vicinity of the caster. Seen/Mentioned: Used multiple times by various characters in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Notes: It can be used non-verbally; Dumbledore does so to detect Harry underneath his Invisibility Cloak.[13]. (Homorphus Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Causes an Animagus or transfigured object to assume its normal shape. Seen/Mentioned: According to Gilderoy Lockhart, he used it to force the Wagga Wagga Werewolf to take its human form (Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets). (Horton-Keitch Braking Charm)
    Prounciation: Unknown Description: This spell was first used on the Comet 140 to prevent players from overshooting the goal posts and from flying off-sides. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned in Quidditch Through the Ages as the charm that gave the Comet 140 an advantage over the Cleansweep. Notes: See Quidditch. (Hurling Hex)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Causes brooms to vibrate violently in the air and try to buck their rider off. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Professor Quirrell may have been casting a wordless and wandless version of this spell on Harry's broom during his Quidditch match. Professor Flitwick suggested that Harry's confiscated Firebolt may be jinxed with this spell. I

    Impedimenta (Impediment Jinx, Impediment Curse)
    Pronunciation: im-ped-ih-MEN-tah (IPA: /ɪm.ˌpɛ.dɪ.'mɛn.ta/ Description: This hex is capable of tripping, freezing, binding, knocking back and generally impeding the target's progress towards the caster. The extent to which the spell's specific action can be controlled by the caster is not made clear. If this spell does bind it does eventually wear off as stated in Deathly Hallows. Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Harry is practising for the third task. Also used by Madam Hooch to momentarily stop Harry from fighting with Draco Malfoy. Also seen toward the end of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, when Harry is fighting the Death Eaters. Stronger uses of this spell seem capable of blowing targets away. Suggested Etymology: Latin impedimentum (plural impedimenta),[5] "a hindrance" or "an impediment". Imperio (Imperius Curse)
    Main article: Unforgivable Curses
    Pronunciation: im-PEER-ee-oh (IPA: [ɪm.'pi.ɹi.ˌəʊ]) (classical Latin: eem-PEHR-ee-oh (IPA: [im.ˈpɛɾ.i.ˌɔ]) Description: One of the three "Unforgivable Curses". Places the subject in a dream-like state, in which he or she is utterly subject to the will of the caster. However, those who are strong willed may learn to resist it.[HP4] Seen/Mentioned: Used on many occasions. First seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Barty Crouch Jr, impersonating ex-Auror Alastor "Mad-Eye" Moody, uses it on a spider and later on students during a "class demonstration" in a Defence Against the Dark Arts lecture. While breaking into Gringotts in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Harry uses it on a goblin and a Death Eater when they became suspicious. Suggested Etymology: Latin impero, "I command", and English imperious.[5] (Imperturbable Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Makes objects such as doors impenetrable (by everything, including sounds and objects). Seen/Mentioned: The spell is used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by Hermione to trap Rita Skeeter within a bottle while she was in beetle form. It was also used by Mrs Weasley in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix on the door of the room in which an Order of the Phoenix meeting was being held, in order to prevent her sons, Fred and George, from eavesdropping Impervius (Impervius Charm)
    Pronunciation: im-PURR-vee-uss (IPA: [ɪm.'pɝ.vi.ˌɛs]) Description: This spell makes something repel (literally, become impervious to) substances and outside forces including water and sound. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban on Harry's glasses while in a Quidditch match and also by the Gryffindor Quidditch team in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, both times to allow team members to see in a driving rain. Also used in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, first by Ron to protect objects in Yaxley's office from rain, and then by Hermione in a desperate attempt to protect Harry, Ron and Griphook from the burning treasure in the Lestranges' vault. Incarcerous
    Pronunciation: in-CAR-ser-us (IPA: [ɪn.'kaɹ.sɝ.ˌɪs]) Description: Ties someone or something up with ropes. Seen/Mentioned: First heard in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, when Dolores Umbridge gets in a battle with the centaurs. Also used by Harry on the Inferi in Lord Voldemort's Horcrux chamber, in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Notes: A non-verbal version of this spell may have been used to tie up Peter Pettigrew in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. It may also have been used by Quirrell near the end of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. Incendio
    Pronunciation: in-SEN-dee-oh (IPA: [ɪn.'sɛn.di.ˌəʊ]) Description: Produces fire.[8] Seen/Mentioned: It is first seen in Philosopher's Stone when Hermonie used it to set fire to Snape's Robes. Used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by Arthur Weasley to create a fire in the Dursleys' hearth so that he could use Floo powder there. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, this spell is used several times in battle, most noticeably when Hagrid's hut is set ablaze. (Intruder Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Detects intruders and sounds an alarm. Seen/Mentioned: Horace Slughorn had it on a temporary Muggle owned house he was living in, allowing him to detect Albus Dumbledore and Harry Potter as they approached in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. J

    (Jelly-Legs Jinx)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: A jinx that renders its victim's legs temporarily useless, leaving them to wobble around helplessly until the effect wears off or the counter-jinx is performed. Seen/Mentioned: While pratising for the Third Task of the Triwizard Tournament, Herry used a Shield Charm against Hermione's Jinx, but he failed.GF Ch.31 After the tournament, Malfoy, Crabbe and Goyle tried to harass Harry and were hit with a few hexes, curses and jinxes, including the Jelly-Legs Jinx.GF Ch.37 K

    (Knee-Reversal Hex)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Seen/Mentioned: In Quidditch Through the Ages, Gertie Keddle uses this hex when a man playing an early form of Quidditch comes to retrieve his ball from her garden. L

    Langlock
    Pronunciation: LAN-glock (IPA: ['leɪŋ.lɔk]) Description: Glues the subject's tongue to the roof of their mouth. Created by the Half-Blood Prince. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Harry in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince on Peeves and also on Argus Filch, to general applause. Notes: This is similar to the Tongue-Tying Curse. Legilimens (Legilimency Spell)
    See also the article Legilimency for more information

    Pronunciation: Le-JIL-ih-mens (IPA: [lɛ.'dʒɪl.ɪ.ˌmɛnz]) Description: Allows the caster to delve into the mind of the victim, allowing the caster to see the memories, thoughts, and emotions of the victim. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Professor Snape on Harry during Occlumency lessons in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Also used non-verbally by Snape on Harry in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince to allow him to see where Harry had learnt the Sectumsempra spell. Levicorpus
    Pronunciation: levi-COR-pus (nonverbal) (IPA: [lɛvɪ.'kɔɹ.pɪs]) Description: The victim is dangled upside-down by their ankles, sometimes accompanied by a flash of light.[14] Seen/Mentioned: Apparently invented by Severus Snape; it is a non-verbal-only spell (although it is whispered by Hermione in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows). Harry Potter learns it by reading the notes written by the Half-Blood Prince. He inadvertantly uses it on Ron in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry had seen (through the Pensieve) his father, James Potter, use the spell against Professor Snape. Liberacorpus
    Pronunciation: lib-er-ah-COR-pus (nonverbal) (IPA: [lɪˌb.ɛ.ɹæ.'kɔɹ.pɪs] Description: The counterspell to Levicorpus. Seen/Mentioned: Harry uses the spell in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince to counteract the Levicorpus spell he inadvertently casts on Ron. Suggested Etymology: Latin liberare, "to free", and corpus, "body". [3] Locomotor...
    Pronunciation: loh-koh-MOH-tor (IPA: /ˌlo.ko.ˈmo.tɚ̩/ Description: The spell is always used with the name of a target, at which the wand is pointed (e.g. "Locomotor Trunk!"). The spell causes the named object to rise in the air and move around at the will of the caster. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Nymphadora Tonks in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix to move Harry's trunk from his room. Professor Flitwick similarly uses it to move Professor Trelawney's trunk after Professor Umbridge sacks her. Parvati Patil and Lavender Brown use this spell to race their pencil cases around the edges of the table. A variation seen in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is Piertotum Locomotor, which animated the suits of armour in Hogwarts. Locomotor Mortis (Leg-Locker Curse)
    Pronunciation: loh-koh-MOH-tor MOR-tis (IPA: /ˌlo.ko.ˈmo.tɚ̩ ˈmo˞.tɪs/ Description: Locks the legs together, preventing the victim from moving the legs in any fashion. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Draco Malfoy on Neville Longbottom in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. Used by Harry Potter on Draco Malfoy, who deflects it, in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Notes: It is unclear whether or how this spell is related to the Locomotor spell. Lumos
    Pronunciation: LOO-mos (IPA: ['lu.məʊs]) Description: Creates a narrow beam of light that shines from the wand's tip, like a torch. [8] Seen/Mentioned: Constantly throughout the series. Suggested Etymology: Latin lumen, "light".[3][5] Notes: the counterspell, Nox, puts the light out. M

    Meteolojinx Recanto
    Pronunciation: mee-tee-OH-loh-jincks reh-CAN-toh. Description: Presumably causes weather effects caused by incantations to cease. Seen/Mentioned: Suggested in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by Arthur Weasley to Ron (disguised by the Polyjuice Potion) as the best way to clear up the incessant rain in Yaxley's office at the Ministry of Magic. Mobiliarbus
    Pronunciation: MO-bil-ee AR-bus (IPA: [məʊ.ˌbɪl.i.'aɹ.bɪs]) Description: Levitates and moves a tree. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Hermione Granger uses the spell to move a Christmas Tree in The Three Broomsticks beside her table to hide Harry Potter, who was in Hogsmeade illegally. Mobilicorpus
    Pronunciation: MO-bil-ee-COR-pus (IPA: /mo.ˌbɪl.i.ˈko˞.pɪs/) Description: Levitates and moves bodies.[8] Seen/Mentioned: Sirius Black uses it on Severus Snape in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Morsmordre (Dark Mark)
    Pronunciation: morz-MOR-druh or morz-MOHR-dray (IPA: /mo˞z.ˈmo˞.dɹʌ/ or /mo˞z.ˈmo˞.dɹe/) Description: Conjures the Dark Mark. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Barty Crouch Jr in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Also seen in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince over the castle to lure Professor Dumbledore to his death. It was apparently invented by Lord Voldemort. According to Arthur Weasley, very few wizards know how to cast this spell. Suggested Etymology: Latin mors, "death", and French mordre (from Latin mordere), "to bite."[5] Muffliato
    Pronunciation: muf-lee-AH-to (IPA: [mə.fli.'a.təʊ]) Description: Fills peoples' ears with an unidentifiable buzzing to keep them from hearing nearby conversations.[14] Seen/Mentioned: It is used in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by Harry and Ron on various teachers and people such as Madam Pomfrey. It is also used in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by Hermione Granger in protection of the campsite where Harry and her stayed in hiding. N

    Nox
    Pronunciation: Noks (IPA: ['naks]) Description: Turns off the light produced by the Lumos spell. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry and Hermione used this spell to turn off their wand-lights in the Shrieking Shack. Also used in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows when Harry was in the passage beneath the Whomping Willow which leads to the Shrieking Shack. O

    (Obliteration Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Removes things not wished to be seen again. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione Granger in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix to remove the footprints that she, Harry, and Ron left in the snow. Also used in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by Hermione Granger to remove the footprints she and Harry leave behind them in the snow as they journey through Godric's Hollow. Notes: The above instance in book five only reveals that the Obliteration Charm can remove footprints. There is no explanation as to what effect it can have on other things. Obliviate (Memory Charm, Memory-Modifying Charm)
    Pronunciation: oh-BLI-vee-ate (IPA: [əʊ.'blɪ.vi.ˌeɪt] Description: Used to hide a memory of a particular event. Seen/Mentioned: First used in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by Gilderoy Lockhart on Harry and Ron; the spell backfired due to a faulty wand, causing Lockhart to lose most of his own memory. In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, it was shown cast on a Muggle during the Quidditch World Cup. In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Hermione Granger uses the spell on two Death Eaters who had followed Harry, Ron, and Hermione after their escape from Bill Weasley's and Fleur Delacour's wedding. In the same book, Hermione uses the charm on Xenophilius Lovegood. Notes: This spell differs from the False Memory Charm. Obscuro
    Pronunciation: ob-SK(Y)OOR-oh (IPA: /ɔb.ˈsk(j)u.ɹəʊ/) Description: Causes a blindfold to appear over the victim's eyes, obstructing their view of their surroundings. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to obstruct the portrait of Phineas Nigellus' view of their location. Oppugno
    Pronunciation: oh-PUG-noh (IPA: /ə.ˈpʊg.no/ Description: Causes animals or conjured objects to attack. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione Granger in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince to attack Ron Weasley with a conjured flock of canaries. Suggested Etymology: Latin oppugno, "I fight against". [3] Orchideous
    Pronunciation: or-KID-ee-us (IPA: /o˞.ˈkɪ.di.əs/ Description: Makes a bouquet of flowers appear out of the caster's wand. Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by Mr Ollivander to test Fleur Delacour's wand. Notes: In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Tom Riddle non-verbally produces flowers for Hepzibah Smith using either this spell or a very similar one.. P

    Pack
    Pronunciation: As in English: IPA: [pæk] Description: Packs a trunk, or perhaps any luggage. Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by Remus Lupin in his office, and in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by Nymphadora Tonks, once verbally and again non-verbally. Notes: The neatness of the packing seems to depend on the desire and ability of the caster. (Permanent Sticking Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Makes objects permanently stay in place. Seen/Mentioned: First mentioned in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Sirius suspects that his mother's painting was fixed to the wall with such a Charm. In the beginning of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, it is implied that the magical portrait in the Muggle Prime Minister's office also has such a charm on it. In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Harry discovers that it was used by Sirius Black to permanently affix his pictures to the wall in his room. Petrificus Totalus (Full Body-Bind Curse)
    Pronunciation: pe-TRI-fi-cus to-TAH-lus (IPA: [pə.ˈtrɪ.fə.kəs ˈtoʊ.tl̩.əs] Description: Used to temporarily bind the victim's body in a position much like that of a soldier at attention; the victim will usually fall to the ground.[8] Seen/Mentioned: First used in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone by Hermione, who was trying to prevent Neville from stopping her, Ron, and Harry from leaving the common room to hunt for the Philosopher's Stone. It is then used throughout the rest of the series, especially during the Battle of the Department of Mysteries in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Piertotum Locomotor
    Pronunciation: pee-ayr-TOH-tum (or peer-TOH-tum) loh-koh-MOH-tor (IPA: [pɪɛ˞.ˈtoʊ.təm] or IPA: pɪə.ˈtoʊ.təm ˌlo.ko.ˈmoʊ.tɚ) Description: Spell used to animate statues and suits of armour to do the caster's bidding. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Professor McGonagall uses this spell to animate the suits of armour and statues within Hogwarts, to defend the castle. Point Me (Four-Point Spell)
    Pronunciation: As in English (IPA: ['pɔɪnt 'mi]) Description: Causes the caster's wand tip to point to the north cardinal point, acting like a compass. Seen/Mentioned: By Harry during the third task of the Triwizard Tournament in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Portus
    Pronunciation: POR-tus (IPA: ['pɔɹ.tɪs]) Description: Turns an object into a portkey Seen/Mentioned: Used by Professor Dumbledore in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Notes: Portkeys were first seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire as a means for Harry, Hermione, and the Weasleys to go to the Quidditch World Cup. However, the spell used in its creation was not seen until the Order of the Phoenix. Prior Incantato
    Pronunciation: pri-OR in-can-TAH-toh Description: Causes the echo (a shadow or image) of the last spell cast by a wand to emanate from it. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Amos Diggory in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire to discover the last spell cast by Harry's wand after it was found in the hands of Winky, a house-elf. Mentioned in Deathly Hallows as a means of discovering that Harry had been casting spells with Hermione's wand (impying that his own was broken). (Priori Incantatem/Reverse Spell Effect)
    Main article: Magic (Harry Potter)

    (Protean Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Causes copies of an object to be remotely affected by changes made to the original. Seen/Mentioned: First used in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Hermione Granger put the charm on a number of fake Galleons[7]. Instead of the serial number around the edge of the coin, the time and date of the next meeting of Dumbledore's Army appeared. Protego (Shield Charm)
    Pronunciation: pro-TAY-goh (IPA: [pɹəʊ.'teɪ.gəʊ]) Description: The Shield Charm causes minor to moderate jinxes, curses, and hexes to rebound upon the attacker.[11] Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, in which Harry is taught this spell by Hermione in preparation for the third task in the Triwizard Tournament. It is then used throughout the rest of the series. Suggested Etymology: Latin protego, or "I protect".[3] Notes: In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Lord Voldemort conjured a shield to defend himself against an attack by Professor Dumbledore. This may have been a variant of Protego. The original description of this spell states that it rebounds minor jinxes onto the caster. However, it is shown in the books that it can also be used to reflect or lessen the effects of more powerful spells. Protego Horribilis
    Pronunciation: pro-TAY-goh horr-uh-BIL-lis (IPA: [pɹəʊ.'teɪ.gəʊ ˌhɔɹ.ɚ.ˈbɪ.lɪs]) Description: Provides some form of protection against dark magic. Seen/Mentioned: Cast by Professor Flitwick in an attempt to strengthen the castle's defences in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Suggested Etymology: Latin Protego, "I protect"[3]and Horribilis, "horrible , frightful, dreadful". Protego Totalum
    Pronunciation: pro-TAY-go/prah-TEH-go toh-TAH-lum (IPA: [pɹəʊ.'teɪ.gəʊ toʊ.ˈtæ.lm̩]) Description: Provides protection of some form for an area or dwelling. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, this is one of the spells used by Hermione and Harry to protect their camp site from unwanted visitors. Q

    Quietus
    Pronunciation: KWY-uh-tus (IPA: [kwi.'eɪ.tɪs]) Description: Makes a magically magnified voice return to normal. Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by Ludo Bagman. Notes: Functions as the counterspell to Sonorus. R

    Reducio
    Pronunciation: re-DOO-see-oh (IPA: [ɹɛ.'du.si.ˌəʊ]) Description: Makes an enlarged object smaller. Counter-charm to Engorgio. Suggested Etymology: Latin Reducere, "to shrink".[5] Notes: References in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by Arthur Weasley to "shrinking door keys" imply that this charm can be used on object that have not been engorged. Reducto (Reductor Curse)
    Pronunciation: re-DUK-toh (IPA: [ɹɛ.'dʌk.təʊ]) Description: Disintegrates or destroys objects in the caster's path. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry uses it on one of the hedges of the Triwizard maze and ends up burning a small hole in it; in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Gryffindors in Harry Potter's year reference Parvati Patil as being able to reduce a table full of dark detectors to ashes; in Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, a member of the Order of the Phoenix attempts to use this spell to break down a door which Death Eaters have blocked when the Death Eaters have cornered Dumbledore in the Lightning Struck Tower. (Refilling Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Refills whatever the caster points at with the drink originally in the container. Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, when Harry notices that Hagrid and Professor Slughorn are running out of mead. Notes: Cast non-verbally by Harry in the aforementioned circumstance. Relashio
    Pronunciation: Re-LASH-ee-oh (IPA: [ɹɛ.'læ.ʃi.ˌəʊ]) Description: A charm used to force someone or something to release that which it holds or grapples by means of shooting fiery sparks out or, underwater, shooting hot bursts of water. Also causes victim of spell to simply release whatever they are holding at the time. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Harry Potter against Grindylows in the second task of the Triwizard Tournament. When used more expertly by Bob Ogden in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, it threw Marvolo Gaunt backwards after an attempted attack. Also used in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows, when Hermione uses this spell to free Mrs. Cattermole from the chained chair. Rennervate
    Pronunciation: ree-NUR-vayt (IPA: [ɹi.nɚɹ'.veɪt]) Description: Brings someone out of unconsciousness. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Amos Diggory uses it to wake up Winky and Professor Dumbledore uses it to wake up Viktor Krum. Harry Potter later uses it to try and reawaken a cursed Dumbledore in the seaside cave. Suggested Etymology: Officially renamed from Ennervate by J.K. Rowling[15] from the prefix "re-" would come from Latin re-, "again" and "en-" Old French from "in-" L. cause to be + "nerves" Eng. c.1603 strength, from "nervus" L. nerve [16] Notes: Counterspell to Stupefy; when this spell is cast, red light is (sometimes) emitted. Reparo
    Pronunciation: reh-PAH-roh (IPA: [ɹɛ.'pa.ɹəʊ]) Description: Used to repair objects. [8] Seen/Mentioned: Countless times throughout the books. Shattered objects are often described as having "flown" back together. However, substances contained within broken objects are not restored. Notes: The final spell shown cast in the Harry Potter series. Repello Muggletum (Muggle-Repelling Charm)
    Pronunciation: reh-PELL-loh MUG-ul-tum or MUGG-gleh-tum or mugg-GLEE-tum (IPA: /ɹə.ˈpɛl.əʊ ˈmʊ.ɡl.ˌtʌm/ or /ˈmʊ.ɡlə.tʌm/ or /mʊ.ˈɡli.tʌm/) Description: Keeps Muggles away from wizarding places by causing them to remember important meetings they missed and to cause the Muggles in question to forget what they were doing. Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned in Quidditch Through the Ages as being used to keep Muggles away from the Quidditch World Cup. Hogwarts was also said to be guarded by the Muggle-Repelling Charm. It is also used by Harry and Hermione on numerous occasions, among many other spells, to protect and hide their camp site in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Rictusempra (Tickling Charm)
    Pronunciation: ric-tuh-SEM-pra Description: The subject experiences the sensation of being tickled. Seen/Mentioned: By Harry Potter on Draco Malfoy in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, when they fought in the Duelling Club. Notes: This spell takes the form of a jet of silver light. Riddikulus (Boggart-Banishing Spell)
    Pronunciation: rih-dih-KYU-lus Description: A spell used when fighting a Boggart, "Riddikulus" forces the Boggart to take the appearance of an object the caster finds humorous, with the desire that laughter will weaken the Boggart. Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, when taught by Professor Lupin. Seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire on a boggart that was in the maze in the Third Task. Later appears in an attempted use by Molly Weasley in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Suggested Etymology: Latin word ridiculus, "laughable".[5] Notes: The effect depends on what the caster is thinking. Neville concentrates on his grandmother's dress, causing Boggart -Snape to appear in it. S

    Salvio Hexia
    Pronunciation: SAL-vee-oh HECKS-ee-ah Description: Provides some form of protection to an area or dwelling. Seen/Mentioned: Harry and Hermione cast this spell to strengthen their campsite's defences against intruders in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Scourgify (Scouring Charm)
    Pronunciation: SKUR-jih-fy Description: Used to clean something.[7][8] Seen/Mentioned: First used by Nymphadora Tonks to clean Hedwig's cage in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Later, Ginny Weasley performs the spell to clean up Stinksap in the Hogwarts Express. Sectumsempra
    Pronunciation: sec-tum-SEMP-rah [ˌsɛktəm'sɛmpɹa] Description: Creates terrible wounds to the target, described as being as though the subject had been "slashed by a sword".[14] Seen/Mentioned: Used by Harry in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince against Draco Malfoy, and then later against both the Inferi in Lord Voldemort's Horcrux chamber, and Snape during his flight from Hogwarts. In the opening chapters of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Snape casts this curse against George Weasley in the Order's flight from Privet Drive. Notes: Though Severus Snape was able to mend the wounds inflicted on Draco Malfoy by this curse with ease, with "an incantation that sounded almost like song", Molly Weasley was unable to heal her son George Weasley, when his ear was severed by the curse. Serpensortia
    Pronunciation: ser-pen-SOR-shah [ˌsɛɹpən'sɒɹtʃa] Description: Conjures a serpent from the spellcaster's wand.[8] Seen/Mentioned: Used by Draco Malfoy while dueling Harry in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Silencio (Silencing Charm)
    Pronunciation: sih-LEN-see-oh [si'lɛnsiˌo] Description: Makes something silent[7][8] Seen/Mentioned: First used by Hermione in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix to silence a frog and a raven in Charms class, then later to silence a Death Eater that was trying to shout for help. (Slug-Vomiting Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: A jet of green light strikes the victim, who then vomits slugs for several minutes. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Ron Weasley attempts to use it on Draco Malfoy; the spell backfired and hit him instead. Mentioned in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix before Gryffindor's first Qudditch Match against Slytherin when Draco taunts Ron, "Harry was reminded forcibly of the time that Ron had accidentally put a Slug-Vomiting Charm on himself".OP Ch.19 Notes: There was no incantation for this spell, Ron merely yelled, "You'll pay for that, Malfoy!" before pointing his wand. Sonorus
    Pronunciation: soh-NOh-rus[so'noɹəs] Description: Magnifies the spellcaster's voice, functioning as a magical megaphone Seen/Mentioned: By Ludo Bagman and Cornelius Fudge in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire to commentate at the Quidditch World Cup. Also used by Professor Dumbledore to silence everyone in the Great Hall in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Used by Lord Voldemort several times during the Battle of Hogwarts in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Suggested Etymology: Latin sonor, "sound"; English sonorous.[5] Notes: The counter-spell is Quietus. Specialis Revelio (Scarpin's Revelaspell)
    Pronunciation: speh-see-AHLIS reh-VEL-ee-oh Description: Causes an object to show its hidden secrets or magical properties. Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione Granger to find out more of Harry's Advanced Potion-Making book in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Used by Ernie Macmillan to find out ingredients of a potion. (Stealth Sensoring Spell)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Detects those under magical disguise. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Professor Umbridge casts this around her office. (Stinging Hex, Stinging Jinx)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Produces a stinging sensation in the victim, resulting in angry red welts and occasionally the severe inflammation of the affected area. Seen/Mentioned: Harry Potter inadvertently casts one on Professor Snape during Occlumency lessons in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Hermione Granger casts the Stinging Hex on Harry Potter in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to purposefully distort Harry's appearance. Stupefy (Stunning Spell, Stupefying Charm)
    Pronunciation: STOO-puh-fye Description: Puts the victim in an unconscious state. Manifests as a beam of red light. Seen/Mentioned: Often; particularly by a number of wizards and witches (including Dolores Umbridge) against Professor McGonagall in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. It's also taught by Harry in his D.A. meetings. Suggested Etymology: Latin stupefacere, stupere, "to be stunned". [5] Cf. English stupor. (Supersensory Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Able to possess more superior senses than before Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned by Ron outside of the Hogwarts Express during the epilogue of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows as a potential substitute for using mirrors while driving a Muggle automobile. (Switching Spell)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Causes two objects to be switched for one another Seen/Mentioned: Harry contemplates using this spell against his dragon in the first task of the Triwizard Tournament. Neville also uses this in Transfiguration class in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, and accidentally transplants his ears onto a cactus. T

    (The Taboo)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: A jinx which may be placed upon a word or a name, so that whenever that word is spoken, a magical disturbance is created which alerts the caster of the Taboo to the location of the speaker. Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, this spell is placed on the word "Voldemort"; in this manner Harry Potter, Ronald Weasley and Hermione Granger are tracked throughout their journey until Ron discovers the Taboo and tells the other two to stop using the word. Later in the book, Harry accidentally says Voldemort's name again, resulting in the trio being caught and taken to Malfoy Manor. Tarantallegra
    Pronunciation: ta-RON-tuh-LEG-rah Description: Makes victim's legs dance uncontrollably (recalling the tarantella dance). Seen/Mentioned: First used by Draco Malfoy on Harry in the Dueling Club in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, a counterjinx is mentioned but not named. It is notably used against Neville Longbottom in the Department of Mysteries, causing the prophecy to be broken. Suggested Etymology: Tarantula, a spider; Spanish tarantella, a kind of fast country dance once popular in parts of Italy, supposedly from the frantic motion caused by the bite of a tarantula; allegro, a musical term meaning "quick".[5] Tergeo
    Pronunciation: TUR-jee-oh (IPA: ['tɝ.dʒi.əʊ]) Description: Siphons material from a surface, eg. blood, ink, dust, etc. Seen/Mentioned: Hermione Granger uses this spell in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince to remove blood from Harry's face. It is later used to remove spilled ink from parchment. It was used in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to clean off a handkerchief by Ron and to dust off a picture of Gellert Grindelwald in Bathilda Bagshot's house. Suggested Etymology: Latin tergeo: "I rub clean, wipe, polish".[3] (Tongue-Tying Curse)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: A curse which prevents certain information from being revealed by the individual upon whom the spell is placed. The curse manifests itself by causing the tongue to temporarily curl backwards upon itself. Seen/Mentioned: Seen in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows as a deterrent to Severus Snape, or any other unwanted visitor of Number 12 Grimmauld Place, from betraying their location to anyone else. (Trip Jinx)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Causes the victim of the jinx to trip and fall.[HP5] Seen/Mentioned: Used by Draco Malfoy in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, to catch Harry Potter when he was fleeing after Dumbledore's Army was discovered. U

    (Unbreakable Vow)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Causes a vow taken by a witch or wizard to be inviolable; if they should break it, the consequence is death. Seen/Mentioned: Severus Snape takes an Unbreakable Vow with Narcissa Malfoy at the beginning of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, vowing to help Narcissa's son Draco with a task given to him by Voldemort, and to finish the task should Draco prove incapable. Fred and George Weasley attempted to cast this on Ron Weasley as children; when their father discoverd them, he punished them severely. (Undetectable Extension Charm)
    Pronunciation: Unknown Description: Causes a container's capacity to be increased, without changing the object's ex
  • This episode had the chance to be really great and it totally blew that chance.

    7.5
    I am not enough of a HM fan to know if the mother has been introduced before. But you would think in a family without that parent, the loss of the wife and mom would result in some grief. You never see that grief. But then again, this is TV. In the dream sequence, the mom waltzes in and starts interacting with Miley and there is no sense of surprise or mention of how she died or why she isn't around. That too, seems a bit casual for a young girl who has lost her mom to death.

    I did like Brooke Shields in this role. She fit nicely with the cast and it almost made me wish they could play around with the plot and put the mother back in this family. It would be more interesting and give some new dynamics to all of the relationships. Overall, I didn't feel the comedy was very strong. If it was supposed to be sweet and tear jerky, then it should have been more soulful. There were a lot of fond glances at the dad, the dream mom, etc. but it was not genuine family affection, which is amazing since Miley and Billy are actually family. The warmth between Miley and Jackson seemed forced and phony and out of thin air.

    So while I am not as brutal about this episode as fumbledoof, I think this was a missed opportunity to film a pretty great episode. Instead they filmed one that was adequate at best.
  • Amazingly Funny and entertaining!

    9.7
    I loved this episode! It really shows how talented Miley Cyrus is and can actually sing! I think it was good that we got to see her mum. I thought this episode was hilarious. Especially in some parts. Eg. When she is singing lifes what you make it and her voice cracks, when she is singing it with her dad, Lily and Oliver and having fun and at the end Oliver makes a high pitxhed funny sound and Jackson is dancing with the pair of legs and says "Oh Jenny isnt the concert wonderful, Oh you bad girl" haha so funny!, and also when her dad gives her Loco Hot Coco and says "so you dont chokeo..chokeo..chokeooo! Hilarious, when she is having the dream and she tries to sing This is the life but cant and when Jackson is Bucky Kentucky! Last of all at then end when Robbie Ray is drinking hot chocolate and has cream on his top lip. This episode was Absoloutly amazing and super hilarious. Jackson just keeps on getting better and better!
  • Somewhat lukewarm....

    7.2
    I liked how Miley finally realized that her friends and family will always love her....I just think it was a little weird that she dreamt about her mom out of nowhere. I thought it was funny how that loud wacky table of theirs finally got made fun of by Miley's mom though...I hate that table! It was also funny how Miley had to use that marker board to communicate with others...they did a good job making that funny! This one is a "filler" episode in my book, but if nothing else is on, I'll probably watch it again.
  • Miley looses her voice and worries about her future as Hannah Montana.

    9.0
    Well, the first part of the episode was meant for humor. Miley couldn't speak so she had to write what she wanted to say on a whiteboard. Lily and Oliver had to interperet what she wanted to say and ultimately messed up, giving her bad grades and missed dates.

    After figuring out she needed surgury to correct this, Miley starts worrying "What if the surgeon messes up?" After having some hoot chocolate that her dad made, she has a crazy dream where she isn't Hannah Montana anymore and the singing honor goes to Jackson, now known as Bucky Kentucky. I liked the rhyme.

    Then after being ignored, she is visited in the dream by her mom, who tells here everything will be alright. Lily and Oliver say that no matter what she'll still be their friend and Jackson says that in real life he sings like a starved walrus. Miley then hugs him and the dream ends.

    I think this episode was very meaningful. It showed that Miley's friends like her for who she is and her family loves her as well. It makes for quite a good episode.
  • So Miley loses her voice and thinks everybody's gonna hate her cause of it, and her brother's gonna become BUCKY KENTUCKY! now that was funny..

    9.0
    I thought it was aightt . . . . i loved Lily's hair and how it looked like her and Oliver were together going to a concert ^_^
    But it showed a lot of things like her mother, some brotherly love, and all . . . I also like when hwe mother yells at hwe dad. . . I wish I could realize when I was having a dream! I would do some fun stuff =P It's not like it was you know suspenseful or anything. . . . but it was . . good

  • Miley loses her voice and must undergo throat surgery, or she can't be Hannah Montana. Her surgeon informs her that the chance of her losing her singing voice is one in a million. Miley, scared of losing her voice, has a dream where she is just Miley.

    9.6
    Overall, this was a touching episode. This episode was the last to air in the Freshman High Five (the airing of the new season) and was, in my opinion, the best out of all of them. There is no other plotline in this episode because most of everything revolves around Miley. A truly great part in this episode was the dream sequence, where Miley imagines that no one loves her anymore because she is not Hannah Montana anymore. The first part is hilarious with funny one-liners and humorous antics. The last part is very moving because Miley's mother teaches Miley that even if she does lose her voice, then everyone will still love her. Overall, this was a heartrending episode.
  • Now it was a great episode, but didn't ANOTHER show do something like this WAY before Hannah Montana?

    9.6
    Full Moon wo ____ or Searching for a Full Moon is about a young brunette who wasn't allowed to become a singer because of her voice. She meets two Shimigami that tell her she was going to die in a year. She runs off to audition as a singer so she will die, completing her dream. They eventually help her. With one snap, her hair became blond and she was older, so she didn't have throat cancer anymore. When she changes back, she was still suffering. Later in the series, she too began to worry about loosing her voice in the process of surgery. In the end, she was ok. Doesn't THAT sound familiar? It was a great Hannah Montana episode and all, but doesn't this episode sound like another show? I know it's not exactly the same, but doesn't it seem like Hannah was kind of based off of Full Moon?
  • UH-OH! mileys lost her voice!

    8.5
    i liked this epiode very much. it was enjoyable and funny, especially mileys dreams about her mother! this episode may be 'just a filler' episode but it was pretty cool. lilly was very funny, and for the first time in a long time jackson was being nice to Miley, which creeped me out and scared me a little bit as he is usually making fun of her. Oliver was funny in this episode as well!:D however i would have to say the highlight of this episode was Mileys dream; they were wacky, yet at the same time hilarious. I'll rememeber this episode for a very long time.
  • Miley needs throat surgury or she can not be Hannah Montana anymore.

    9.4
    This is a very special episode. It involves a flashback to many memories Miley had with her mother. This also gives us a gimpse into why Miley became Hannah Montana. I am giving this episode a 9.4 because some parts were a little too predictable. And I didn't find this episode as funny as the others. Plus I wish they had given a bit more information as to how Miley's mother had died.
  • I thought it was gonna be a little bit more sader.

    9.6
    This was still a pretty good episode but i wanted like a flash back when she was younger but oh well. Anyway this episode was about Miley losing her voice. The doctor comes and does surgery but worries her about her not being a rock star any more. So she has a dream and her mothers there and all her friends and brother jackson and her dad. Miley mom said that your friends wouldn't change her any different even if she wasn't hannah. Jackson became a singer and Miley acted like she was treated so unfairly. Then she wakes up and her voice is back.
  • Such a sweet episode.

    10
    This episode was hilarious, but it also brought tears to my eyes. Miley loses her voice and can't sing until she gets her surgery. The doctor frightens her when he tells her that the chances of her never being able to sing again are one in a million, because the chances that she became a pop star were one in a million, and she was that one. She was afraid of being the one in a million to lose her singing voice forever, and she had a nightmare about it. When her mother appears in the dream, that's when tears started pouring from my eyes. It was so beautiful seeing her mother, because I remember her mother died a while ago. I cried so much. It was so sweet.
  • I love this episode!

    9.7
    Miley as Hannah is doing a concert and she sings too much, which hurts her voice. So, she goes a week without talking and singing. When a week goes by, she can talk and sing fine. Then, at the next concert, her voice starts cracking. The doctor tells her that she'll need to go through surgery if she ever wants to sing again. Miley's nervous and has a dream with her late mother (played by Brooke Shields).

    I love this episode! Everyone was really great in this episode and it was funny, but a little more serious. It was nice that we FINALLY got to see Miley and Jackson's mom. At first, I thought Brooke Shields wouldn't do such a good job, but she surprise me! I love it when Miley's nervous about the surgery and Jackson is saying what could happen that could mess the surgery up and Miley goes 'Oh no. My career will be ruin all to a gaint weiner (hot dog)!' LOL! I love that! Great episode to end Freshmen High Five!
  • Miley's mom!? cool!

    9.7
    Poor Miley, I felt sorry she had larinqitz. I liked it when the doctor was "trying" to make her feel betterbut didn;t. I loved the fact that in this episode we dig a little more into Miley's past when we see her mother in her dream. I thought this was great because we really got to see how much Miley misses her mom. I also love that they put Hannah's carrer on the line. This the first time Miley thinks about what her life would be like if she wasn't Hannah Montana. We she this in her dream also. Miley realizes that sure her life wouldn't be as glamourous but she'd still have family and friends who care about her behind her every step of the way. We can truley see that Oliver and Lily are true friends and there to stay. With all the potential this series has, I don't see why is it stealing material seen before a hundred times on a million other series. The episode explores Miley's love of being Hanna and singing on stage for her fans, With all the potential this series has, I don't see why is it stealing material seen before a hundred times on a million other series. The episode explores Miley's love of being Hannah and singing on stage for her fans!!!
  • This episode is about how Hannah Montana has something wrong with her vocal cords but needs an peration if she wants to sing again.

    9.0
    I think this episode is very good it was really funny and I don't know why people didn't really like this episode. I think it had all the elements in this episode. All in all it was good episode and I enjoyed seing Brooke Shields back on the tv again.
  • Miley has laryngitis and may have to cancel a show, but she also fears she won't get to be Hannah Montana anymore.

    9.0
    With all the potential this series has, I don't see why is it stealing material seen before a hundred times on a million other series. The episode explores Miley's love of being Hanna and singing on stage for her fans, but it also puts her in the old Cinderella dream sequence seen before on hundreds of other shows like "Gilligan's Island." However, it redeems itself with the aspect of lucid dreaming, reminding Miley that she can control what happens in her dreams. Brooke Shields also shines as Miley's mom, hopefully opening the door for more appearances and maybe her own series again. It's a charming and better episode that some of the episodes, but not quite a perfectly written episode.
  • Another great episode.

    10
    This was another great episode of Hannah Montana. I loved the fact that in this episode we dig a little more into Miley's past when we see her mother in her dream. I thought this was great because we really got to see how much Miley misses her mom. I also love that they put Hannah's carrer on the line. This the first time Miley thinks about what her life would be like if she wasn't Hannah Montana. We she this in her dream also. Miley realizes that sure her life wouldn't be as glamourous but she'd still have family and friends who care about her behind her every step of the way. We can truley see that Oliver and Lily are true friends and there to stay. I think Miley learns a true lesson about the importance of the loved ones around us and she learns that you don't need to be famous for people to like you, and your true friends will be behind you no matter what.
  • Excellent

    10
    This is an awesome episode, I've been waiting to see Brooke shields to appear in this show. It's definitely worth the wait. Brooke Shields plays a perfect mom for Miley, the dream sequences is funny and the writers kept it funny. Just the way I wanted it. The premise for this episode is hilarious, I really had a good time watching it. I was laughing all the way through the episode. Brooke Shields was the real spectacle for this episode, the few moments with her was perfectly written. I wish she can come back for more dream sequences, I really love this episode.
Monday
No results found.
Tuesday
No results found.
Wednesday
No results found.
More
Less