A Hannibal Community
NBC (ended 2015)

Hannibal S02E02: "Sakizuki"


One of Hannibal's constants has been the way its one-off killers either 1.) comment on an episode's larger theme, like the issue of identity and knowing oneself playing out as Gideon and Will both struggled with who they are in "Rôti," or 2.) provide variations on actions that Hannibal himself performs on or seeks out in others. Sometimes it's both, as was the case in the unaired in the U.S. (except for in pieces online) "Œuf," which saw Hannibal attempting to construct a family for himself with Abigail while a woman created her own family of kidnapped children-turned-killers, itself a way of returning to/commenting on Abigail's relationship with her father.

If you've read any of my other reviews on TV.com—particularly my Arrow reviews—you know how much I like it when episodic plots provide commentary on individual characters and/or the corresponding show's serialized arc(s). It's a type of symmetry that helps to give the episodes more narrative heft than just being something along the lines of "Oh, hey, wasn't that cool?" To put it another, more Hannibal-friendly way, it's what delineates nutritious narrative calories from empty narrative calories. I'm all for indulging in the latter every now and then, but I'm always more satisfied by the former. With "Sakizuki," the killer of the week(s)—or, rather Hannibal's diagnosis of the killer—helped to serve up a very good-for-us meal. Hannibal provided the episode's core idea when he identified the killer's motivation: "Those and the world around him are means to an end. He uses them to do what he is driven to do."


Of course, this isn't a very new idea for Hannibal. People and bodies are often used as means to various ends. We've seen it with Jack acknowledging and grappling with using Will as a natural resource to saves lives, Beverly seeking out guidance from Will, Will asking Beverly to re-examine the evidence against him in return for that guidance, and Kade offering up Will to the justice system as a way to protect the FBI. Everyone is a commodity of some sort; everyone is material to be used to gain or create something else.

In Hannibal's case, how he uses people is a little trickier than these comparatively more straightforward and mundane manipulations and quid pro quos. Hannibal sees certain people as ingredients; this week's killer saw certain people as brushstrokes. It's about transforming the humdrum into art, whether it be an elegantly plated dinner or a mural looking up at the heavens in hopes that someone, anyone, is looking back.

That's how Hannibal handles the mundane. But Will isn't mundane. If Will were mundane, he'd have been consumed by now (what would Will taste like?). No, as Gillian Anderson's Bedelia Du Marier told Will, Hannibal believes that everything he's done has been in Will's best interest. Hannibal sees in Will someone he can simmer and plate on a psychological level. If he could push Will over the edge in the right ways, Will would be a truer version of himself, one who kills with responsibility and purpose, like Hannibal.

When you factor in Will's extreme empathy, well, it's all too easy to see how Hannibal would be pleased to find someone who relates to him, at long last. So Hannibal sees Will as a friend. He's always maintained as much, and I think it's true. Why else would he have sat in his office at 7:30pm, waiting for Will to arrive for an appointment that he could not possibly make at the close of "Kaiseki"? This season's role reversal not only offers the narrative twist, but a psychological one for Hannibal. Last week, he spoke about "being Will Graham" and offering up insights as Will Graham would. It's not about giving his opinion—though that's precisely what he did to shake the FBI—but about assuming Will's position, relating to Will in the way that he'd hoped Will would relate to him, even if Will has stated that it will take a million years for the light of friendship to pass between the two of them ever again.


Or would it?! I was initially concerned about Will's sudden return to his late-Season 1 self at the start of the episode. I honestly thought that I'd missed a scene from the previous episode, so I was relieved to find that Will was engaging in a little manipulation of his own with Hannibal by feigning instability, as revealed by a look of satisfaction at being able to fool Hannibal and Alana after he returned to the safety of his cell. It's lovely to see a proactive Will, one who at least understands that he needs to keep Hannibal thinking that Hannibal is in control of the situation ("I'm not interested in getting into a pissing contest with you, Dr. Lecter. Please, pull up a chair."), so that Hannibal will let his guard down a tiny bit, hopefully enough for Will to exploit it. It's Will using himself and Hannibal's ego and desire to see Will "recover" as a means to an important end.

The other means to the same end is Will's new arrangement with Beverly. I'm grooving on Beverly's increased role in these first two episodes of the season, and I hope it continues. They've always been closer to one another than Will has been with Jimmy or Brian, so close that he was quietly gutted when she came to see him for a professional opinion and not as a friend. That small turn likely motivated Will to enact his quid pro quo arrangement with her this week: his help on cases in exchange for her taking another look at his case in search of new evidence. It's a smarter play than insisting that Hannibal framed him, since Hannibal's been cleared and Will's obsession with Hannibal's guilt only made Will look guiltier. Will telling Beverly to focus the microscope on himself has the benefit of potentially finding more evidence to damn him.

Beverly's mention of her other tasks while speaking with Will in front of Hannibal has me a touch worried, though. Hannibal gave a sharp head turn at the comment, so now I'm concerned he's going to go sniffing around Beverly just as she starts to sniff around the evidence, and that's not going to end well.


One character, however, decided she wasn't going to be used by anyone any longer, and that was Du Maurier. Given Gillian Anderson's incredibly busy schedule, I was very curious as to how Hannibal would remove Du Maurier from the story (at least for now; I hope she'll return, as I just can't get enough of Anderson's powerfully muted performance). As she spelled out for us, Hannibal's got her over a barrel with regard to protecting him and lying for him in an effort to keep whatever the attack against her involved, and she's not thrilled with protecting this dangerous thing in a person suit.

I do feel like that Du Maurier's more obvious fear of Hannibal arrived rather suddenly in last week's premiere, and while I chalk it up to the needs of Anderson's schedule, her words of caution to Hannibal in the Season 1 finale and half-knowing comments—"Controversial dish, veal."—indicated a degree of understanding with Hannibal that was all but pushed to the side to motivate her to "withdraw," as she put it to Will. She's aware of the danger, as is Will, but the difference is that she has no outs that don't also hurt her or get her killed (Will currently has the benefit of being in a prison-like hospital). At least Hannibal gave her that very fine exit, a whispered "I believe you" to Will.

Her comment is everything Will needs to survive. It's something he has longed to hear from Alana, Jack, and Beverly, only to have Alana believing he's guilty but also that he wasn't in control of himself, Jack ridden with guilt and confusion over to believe and who to blame, and Beverly likewise carrying guilt but feeling more afraid than anything else. It's a ray of hope, a sign that someone doesn't think he's totally unhinged. Armed with this, I have to imagine that Will may now be able to catch a few new memories.



À LA CARTE

– I've watched this episode three times now. I watched Roland Umber's escape from that silo through my fingers three times. So very squirm-inducing.

– "The color of our skin is so often politicized. It will almost be refreshing to see someone revel in the aesthetics for aesthetic’s sake, if it weren't so horrific." I really sort of hated this line, as aesthetics ARE political. It's not an accident, after all, that the Umber's escape felt very much like a slave fleeing a plantation, bloodied from breaking his own chains, chased by a white man through a rural area.

– "How many colors will this killer add to his box of crayons?" I enjoyed Dancy's choices in that scene, shifting from being almost harshly dismissive of Chilton to gently pleading with Beverly to that harder tone he employed in his delivery of the crayon line. Top-notch stuff.

– In the same vein, Anderson's lack of emphasis anywhere in the line, "I am doing my best to avoid working through my issues with Hannibal Lecter" was just perfect. Any emphasis might've given Jack a clue, but we had the pleasure of enjoying the double meanings involved.

– "I made you pliable. Molded you. Set and sealed you where you lay. This is my design. A dead eye of vision and consciousness. I am fixed and unseeing. Unless someone else sees me. ... One of these things is not like the others. One these things just doesn’t belong. Who are you? Why are you so different from everyone else? I didn't put you here. You are not my design."

– "You’re not alone, you know. In "The Resurrection," Piero della Francesca placed himself in the fresco. Nothing flattering. He depicted himself as a simple guard, asleep at his point. Your placement should be much more meaningful." "It’s not finished." "I'm finishing it for you. We'll finish it together. When your great eye looks to the heavens, what does it see?" "Nothing." "Not anymore." "There is no God." "Certainly not with that attitude. God gave you purpose, not only to create art, but to become it." "Why are you helping me?" "Your eye will now see God reflected back. He will see you. If God is looking down on you, don’t you want to be looking back at him?"

– Our musical selections this week were a brief excerpt of Bach's Mass in B minor, BWV 232: Agnus Dei: Dona nobis pacem as Hannibal gazed down at the eye mural, and then some of the second movement from Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 as Jack and the techs discussed the killer and Hannibal prepared the leg using a veal osso bucco recipe.


Was "Sakizuki" prepared to your liking?


Previously Aired Episode

AIRED ON 8/29/2015

Season 3 : Episode 13

172 Comments
Comments (172)
Submit
Sort: Latest | Popular
whoever wrote the name of Beethoven's symphony when Hannibal prepares that leg deserves my deepest appreciation. I love the musical choice in Hannibal by Hannibal (he has "like a sir" written all over himself, goddamit!) and this one struck a chord on me not only by how beautiful but also because it was slightly familiar, but finding old symphonies is so hard. No lyrics to look for, hard to identify which composer and ach one composed HUNDREDS of symphonies, most of them 2 hours-long and some even lost. As someone with a fine taste in music to another, thank you :)
Reply
Flag
"I believe you" sent chills and a wave of .... uhh excitement all over me.
Reply
Flag
How awkward the filming of those scenes must've been for the people lying there in the circle.
1
Reply
Flag
I was eating dinner and wanted to watch Hannibal... not a good idea... that first scene was very squirm inducing... Great ep though... The resolution of the 'artist-killer' murder was kind of 'fun'... It looks as if Hannibal can help himself and intervene into other killers and usurp their 'work of art'. Or perhaps he is taunting Will, or the FBI, and perhaps he wants to get caught now that his games with Will are very limited... I do wonder if Du Maurier is running away or if Hannibal will get to her... She will be missed but I liked how she gave a kind of coded message to Jack (could she get anymore cryptic...) and then went and did as much as she could (I guess) for Will.
I thought it was a much stronger ep than the premiere
Reply
Flag
The beginning of this episode made me cringe. Hell, I think I might've even squirmed a little bit.
That's extremely rare for me & I loved the feeling of gnashing unease it gave me.

I'm truly jealous of those who are easily disturbed by less.

I also loved Du Maurier's visit to Will. Her admission that she believed him lifted some of the claustrophobia I always get during his scenes.

Past that: Good episode all around!
1
Reply
Flag
About Ceuf...

Just got the Season 1 DVDs (what a disappointment; just a slip of paper inside? No artfully designed booklet chockful of info?) and watched Ceuf over the weekend. I am baffled as to why it was never aired. I'm first-rate squeamish, only just recently able to watch certain films without hands over eyes, and it didn't bother a me a whit. Well, other than, why Will & co. had a problem with the smell in the second house and not the first house, when the bodies in the first house had been dead several days longer than the second.
Reply
Flag
It was not aired in the US because it showed kids turned murderers and it coincided with the Sandy Hook killings and (later) the Boston marathon bombing.
Reply
Flag
Can't wait till Friday Hannibal throws his friend some reasonable doubt but now makes Crawfords first episode words about Will dying all the more curious...
Reply
Flag

1
Reply
Flag
one of the weirdest scenes yet. great fisherman of men metaphor.
1
Reply
Flag
Horrifyingly beautiful. Always.
4
Reply
Flag
Good thing I wasn't eating anything during that opening scene!
1
Reply
Flag
I am not queasy but I couldn't finish my orange lol
2
Reply
Flag
was it during the opening scene? lol
Reply
Flag
lol, yeah when the guy stared ripping out his flesh/sticthes I was like this orange is a NO GO!!! lol
3
Reply
Flag
This comment has been removed.
Reply
Flag
I always eat when I watch Hannibal I'm a vegetarian c:
3
Reply
Flag
lol now i'm craving for a muffin now
1
Reply
Flag
hahaha totally it could be called Food to Die For or Killer Recipes
3
Reply
Flag
Ya that would be about right lol
2
Flag
This comment has been removed.
Reply
Flag
This comment has been removed.
Reply
Flag
This comment has been removed.
Reply
Flag
Hannibal should have his own cooking show heh
Flag
Is there a more terrifying show than this? Terrifying and enthralling at the same time.
19
Reply
Flag
One of the best show on TV right now. Period.
18
Reply
Flag
this episode was so good. all Will needed was someone to say i believe you, so he didnt had to doubt himself anymore. and poor Hannibal he went to kill the one who dumped him and she outsmarted him
9
Reply
Flag
I already miss Dr. Du Maurier! She was that splendid female character this show had needed for half of the 1st season. But I guess it's good to know she took off, not was killed. Cannot wait to see Gillian in other roles, she is perfect in The Fall btw.
And I loved that moment at the end of S1 when Dr. Du Maurier was "kind of know something, kind of OK with it, let's eat!"

She will be missed, but thankfully Beverly's role has increased, because now she's the only strong and interesting femal character in this show.
11
Reply
Flag
This show is incredible. But I am not eating Osso Buco anytime soon!
7
Reply
Flag
I don't even know what that is. Dr. Lecter don't be eatin' no fried chicken, so he ain't never effect my appetite .
7
Reply
Flag
Wait, I thought this show was starting in April on a Tuesday? Instead it's back in March on a Friday? Is NBC trying to kill this?
1
Reply
Flag
Are you out of your mind?
2
Reply
Flag
Somehow I feel that when Crawford finds out the truth about Hannibal and confronts him, he'll be all alone, nobody else will know anything about it, and he'll disappear without a trace.
2
Reply
Flag
Well apparently he already confronted Hannibal alone. I don't think he will die unless a high paying movie role comes up. Actually he could just disappear and return later. Fishburne is one of the things that makes the show great. Then they give you Mads and Gillian Anderson and Hugh Dancy has impressed me immensely. Never even heard of him. Hetienne and Caroline are excellent as well. It would be a different show without Fishburne but still pretty good, there's so much to like.
1
Reply
Flag
It is to TV what Roquefort is to food or what Islay Single Malt is to beverage.
Reply
Flag

32
Reply
Flag
I'm seriously way too amused that he kills in a full on suit complete with pocket square and dress shoes. He doesn't even bother to conceal his (beautiful) face or shellacked hair (full of delicious, delicious incriminating DNA evidence). So vain. I mean, if you're going out to commit murder in the middle of the boonies at least wear sensible shoes!
7
Reply
Flag
I know! How does he not leave hair behind?

Maybe that's how he is finally found out...his DNA where it ought not to be.
1
Reply
Flag
Yeah, but I think his hair is stuck with a great deal of hair grease, so it won't fall off... ;-P
Reply
Flag
Hannibal is well-shellacked, it is true.
1
Flag
So, ratings for this episode dropped from the last? Viewers had better not let this get cancelled. This show is phenomenal and deserves to live out its full run as a complete retelling of the Hannibal story. I'm gonna be really sad if this season is all the Hannibal we get. I blame Cynthia Nixon.
14
Reply
Flag
It might get cancelled. But I seriously doubt that it wouldn't get picked up by some other channel. This show should be on AMC or HBO or somewhere.
6
Reply
Flag
Also they need to air this show online through Netflix. Hannibal on Friday nights seems like a death slot time to me. If they cancel this, I'm going to be sending dinner invitations with the names of NBC executives as the main course.
9
Reply
Flag
I believe Amazon Prime has it as an exclusive. So likely it isn't going to be on Netflix any time soon.
Reply
Flag
Excellent review and comments!

Ever since the spoilers, I've been waiting for Dr. Du Maurier to show up at the asylum. They did a great job with her whispering to Will that she believes him.

I also particularly liked the beginning where Will "played" Hannibal (fake crying)--I believed him and was so relieved at his grin when he was alone in his cell.

It was heartbreaking (surprised to feel that way about a "non-main" character) to see that guy survive so much only to miss the water and die hitting the ground.
20
Reply
Flag
So true! I really wanted him to get away or at least not be put back in the 'eye'
1
Reply
Flag
This show is like watching a master painter create something wonderful on a canvass. This is without a doubt the most beautiful show I have ever seen. I have only been watching TV for a little while. But I can't think of another show that puts as much time in their aesthetics than this show.

And very good analysis Noel. Well done. However I am not sure Hannibal's intention is to create another one of himself in Will. Most because of Hannibal's fatal flaw, perhaps his only flaw. And that is his narcissism. This is how he was found by Will. Hannibal can copy any there serial killer that he wants. But he can't help but leave a bit of himself at the scene. This is how will in the first episode found the copy cat and this is how Will knew that the man at the center of the eye was the killer. Because it wasn't the killer's vision. It was Hannibal's vision of his vision.

Hannibal could teach Will how to be exactly like him. But because of Will's ability to empathize the killer. He could kill the killer but continue the work of the killer to their exacting standards and not leave a trace of himself in the death as Hannibal does. But the question is, can Hannibal deal with that. Did his narcissism prevent that and is that why he put him in the asylum. He could have put the murders at the feet of any other person involved, but he placed them at Will's. Did he put Will there to teach him or did he put will there to become more deliberate. These are all fantastic questions that I really can't wait until the show answers. Can Hannibal overcome his narcissism?

Personally I am not sure, I mean that is how he got caught in the books. He thought he could pull one over on Graham and Graham saw the antique books and figured it out. I would have to wonder what Hannibal would do if Will merely didn't want to have anything to do with him. Hannibal's narcissism prevents him from accepting rejection as we saw when he entered into Dr. Du Maurier's house. He was going to kill her not because of the threat she poses to him, but more likely because of the rejection.

Dr. Du Maurier is interesting as well. I would really like to know her previous relationship with Hannibal. She told Crawford that she had her own Will Graham, likely it is Hannibal. We know something happened to them previously which led her to end their therapy relationship. What led to that? Did Hannibal try to do the same thing to Dr. Du Maurier? But didn't either for the reason that she figured it out, he didn't have the encephalitis to help out, figured that she wasn't up to the task, really any number of things. I would like to see this fleshed out more.

Beverly is dead. Dead, dead dead. She is going to notice something that they would have normally led to Will but he is in prison. Now that she is on Will's side she will make the connection to Hannibal and like everyone else but Will, Hannibal is likely to kill her. Which may lead to Crawford also figuring out that it is Hannibal which then leads to the fight that we saw. Again I can't wait to see how they go about this.

This was a nearly perfect episode. The only the that feels off is Cynthia Nixon's character. She just doesn't fit. I don't know if that is intentional for the character or if it is a commentary on her acting ability. We are in a universe of high IQs and people looking for reason and rationality where there seemingly is none. Their manner of speaking and the vocabulary is similar and she is not. She seems way too simple to exist in this universe.

But other than this show is so fantastic. And I will continue to say that it really shouldn't belong on NBC.
More+
14
Reply
Flag
I don't understand why people are objecting to it being on NBC. Do you think it would be different, or better, on another channel?
As far as I can tell, all it does it make it accessible to more people, and surely that is a good thing.
2
Reply
Flag
It isn't really an objection. I am just shocked at how good it is and it is still on NBC. NBC's hour dramas have been horrible the past few years. And anything good usually gets tossed to the side due to lack of ratings.

I do however think it could be more risqué on another channel. It wouldn't be different, but I think the visuals would be less kiddie friendly and would make for better TV. I also think that on any other channel it would be given a more prominent role rather than relegated to friday at 2200. AMC or HBO would be a better place for this.
1
Reply
Flag
The show is certainly gory enough and does not need more to be a good show. Perhaps the people that are not bothered with this, like you said you're not, are the ones there's something "wrong" with... I find it more scary that nothing affects people anymore.

I certainly hope it won't ever end up on HBO because then it wouldn't be much gorier (because that would take a lot), just a lot more perverted nudity just because they like to sell whores in every show they make.
2
Reply
Flag
Ok, that makes more sense. Thanks.

"less kiddie friendly"? You mean, the two corpses with splayed rip-cages, from last season, wouldn't have had their bare buttocks blurred ;-)
2
Reply
Flag
"less kiddie friendly"!?

a guy rips his sewn appendages from his own face, torso, thighs and another dead body and that says "kiddie friendly" to you?

irradiate your sexual organs and stay away from anyone under the age of 18! jk

i was nearly sick watching this... plus it's the first time we got to see hannibal use actual people bits for cooking. they're usually already in nice "meat" type states.

i need a valium :/
1
Reply
Flag
When I say kiddie friendly I usually mean just the average American tv watcher. Any show on network TV has to get it passed the prudish tv censors of the FCC. I would like to see what they would come up with without having to abide by them.

Also I have seen way worse. And stuff like that never really bothered me.
Flag
There's an image further down the post on Cynthia Nixon. I'm starting to think she may be a colleague of Hannibal's. Serial killers can have friends who are serial killers too, right?

2
Reply
Flag
Sure. There have been many cases where serial killers and serial rapists have worked in tandem. However, Hannibal doesn't strike me as one of those. He could have cultivated and nurtured Abigail Hobbs from last season but didn't. That would seemingly be the best way to go about that, take someone from youth and make them your partner and then your successor when you either die or retire.
1
Reply
Flag
Great, great, great episode, I mean I am little bit obsessed with this show, it is so good. :) The story with Will and Hannibal just keeps getting better with enough mystery and surprises. :)
7
Reply
Flag
I didn't really read the opening scene as a slave escaping from a slave owner, I mean maybe that's how it was intended but it didn't come across for me. I saw it more as just a guy running away from a murderer, aside from the guy being (barely) black there would be no reason to jump to that conclusion whatsoever. I think you're reading into things too much, what your writing class didn't teach you is that not everything's symbolism. I'm not american though so I don't immediately jump to slave when I see a black guy, or master when I see a white guy.
16
Reply
Flag
My jump was to 'Kiss The Girls' and Ashley Judd's escape, more successful than Roland's.

Although, I'm kind of glad Roland didn't survive - better a quick death than whatever would have happened back at the silo, and better than living with huge chunks of flesh missing. Ew.
Reply
Flag
"...aside from the guy being (barely) black..."

What the actual fuck? You do realize slave masters killed and brutalized the darkest of the dark black people, the "barely" black people AND the mulatto (that's old timey speak for biracial for you outside the Americas) offspring that dared to make a break for it. I don't know what you saw in the actor's physical aesthetic that made you deem him "barely black", but sheesh.

However, I do believe the killer picked Roland due to hue and not due to ethnicity. He could have easily targeted an Indian or a Filipino or a South American or an Aborigine or a Middle Easterner, or whomever and found a similar hue. If he was a racist on top of his other myriad of problems, he could have painstakingly picked nothing, but Africans (American or otherwise) to make up his color palette, as blacks run the color spectrum (no mixing required).

Unlike Noel, I could only watch the opener once, but I can understand the allusions he drew from the escape and chase. If Roland had been white we still might be discussing allusions. Rednecks and Deliverance, perhaps?


Reply
Flag
Calm yourself! I actually agree with almost everything you've said but there's no need to be so agressive to @EsmeBuffay
Reply
Flag
Lol, I am calm. Don't mistake incredulaity for agression.
Reply
Flag
Neither did it to me Esme. (but I'm also not american)
2
Reply
Flag
barely black? obviously he was black enough for the killer to include him in his demented palette of kidnapped coloured folk for whom he need to complete his gruesome project. i did not see the victim as just a guy. he was frightened, naked, in pain and running for his life. he was not taking a walk naked and bleeding through a cornfield at the dead of night because he was feeling adventurous. the white guy in question chose him specifically for his melanin content.

the young man was stalked and kidnapped drugged and tortured against his will. to act as if a comparison to an escaped slave is so beyond the pale is disingenuous. of course, everyone views television differently. i happen to watch as an engaged viewer and being engaged i can see similarities between what is depicted and what has happened before whether fictional or true to life. a young black man running naked through a cornfield for his freedom all the while being chased at gunpoint does hearken back to the days of yore when it just did not come across to people that owning another human being for any reason is unconscionable, but because of their race is especially odious.

this idea that the crime was committed against the young man irrespective of his race is inaccurate and untrue. the crime was committed against the young man specifically because of his race.
More +
5
Reply
Flag
Umm....
There were people of all sorts of skin colour in that eye. That was kind of the point. The killer actually wasn't picking a single race because of their race to brutalize. It just happened that the one that had a high resistance to the drugs and managed to escape was black. And yes, not even completely black to because just looking at the actor you can tell he's a mixed race person.
4
Reply
Flag
Staff
Not everything is intended as symbolism, but the choices creators make carry interpretative significance, regardless of if they intended for it to or not.. Hence the pleasures of art.
6
Reply
Flag
I'm not sure about how I feel about all the discussions of the 'slavery suggestion' of this episode. As a black person, something I've always admired about Hannibal is how although it is a show all about the evil and darkness of different human personalities, it subtracts the race of its characters , whether major or minor (see Tobias from last season, Beverley, Jack Crawford and so on)- from the plot. I really disagree on the whole slave running away from its master idea, and I really wish that we lived in a world where that doesn't even need to come up.
11
Reply
Flag
the race of the victims was not subtracted from the crimes committed against them in this episode and the previous episode. these victims were targeted specifically because of their race. i am astonished that somehow the view of the killer is that he was some colorblind artist just kidnapping and killing people at random because he lived in some colorblind utopia. just as jeffrey dahmer targeted twenty-one men of color during his reign of terror so did this guy.

and why again should someone's race be discounted unless you are saying that a person should not be kidnapped, tortured and killed because of their complexion or melanin content? i do not want to live in a world where questions are not asked why a specific victim was targeted for brutalization and murder. random killers exist. what the murderer did as depicted in this episode was not random by a long shot. he had a specific type in mind when he chose the man of color.

symbolism is like everything else those who are willfully ignorant of what came before see a blank slate and those who have knowledge of what has come before see that there is nothing new under the sun and that seeing someone as different is not a crime unless seeing someone as different is the compulsion that creates the crime against that person.

i agree whole-heartedly with noel's description of the opening scene and when i saw it i could not help being reminded of certain scenes in 12 years a slave.
More +
1
Reply
Flag
Dear God. Where to start. I'm not interested in having this argument, and I respect your right to view the scene as you wish.
2
Reply
Flag
Staff
I wouldn't necessarily say "subtracts" but instead "chooses not to acknowledge" which is a bit different to my mind, but also par for the course for plenty of TV.

And it would be nice to live in a world where that scene wouldn't trigger that sort of response.
4
Reply
Flag
@ Noel Kirkpatrick
I like that you took the time to look for the links. Thanks!

1
Reply
Flag
@Noel Kirkpatrick
I'm sorry I don't see the parallel : person running for his life+ corn field= slave ; I see ;horror movies , despair ;it gives me other images, feelings ,sensations. But I agree with the rest of your review .



4
Reply
Flag
Staff
Not a big deal, though I'd be curious if you find the end of Night of the Living Dead to be racially charged (though not slave-centric, obviously.)
Reply
Flag
I haven't seen it.But i'd give it a try.
Reply
Flag
racially charged and reminiscent of the southern states in the late 50's and early 60's. dozens of white men with shotguns and german shepherds roaming the countryside looking for monsters and who do they end up shooting? a man of colour who had spent the majority of the movie trying to protect and help other people from being harmed. once again, the symbolism is woefully apparent. i am more than amazed that people find horror movies as antiseptic and devoid of racial bias. really? what could be more horrific and horrifying than extinguishing someone's existence because of something as natural as a difference of complexion.
2
Reply
Flag
I'm not a big fan of horror films but I think that these films encompasses different themes fear of "the other"(different from"us";whatever form it would take,the objectification of the other,fear to intimacy,violence against oneself or others ,sadism, etc)Not only racial bias. Also I think that the first association you do depends on your own culture and experiences.
3
Reply
Flag
Oh and I love that the clear jump suit is back. Oh, Hannibal!

4
Reply
Flag
Such a masterpiece. That opening was amazingly horrific, especially for a broadcast show; how on Earth did Bryan Fuller get NBC to let them get away with that?
Reply
Flag
Staff
Fun fact: NBC was perfectly okay with this but Fuller's said there was a scene later in the season where a needle was going into someone's eye and they balked that. So, you know, the weirdness of broadcast TV's standards and practices.
8
Reply
Flag
weird! I had to look away from the ripping, the screaming was horrific enough without the visuals! And all that pain and he didn't make it out.
1
Reply
Flag
Another great episode one that made me so anxious at first with that whole failed escaping scene.
And yes I do feel like Will is finally making some interesting choices, nice ones actually by playing the victim with Hannibal and asking Beverly for her help.
Whatelse? ah! I want a murder suit! it seems so convenient to have one.
1
Reply
Flag
The acting, the aesthetic and writing are outstanding ,every episode makes me to know more about this bleak world.

12
Reply
Flag
I loved it. This episode really built off of what they set up in the previous episode. The murders once again added to the dark beauty of the show, and also had possibly the most cringe-inducing sequence of the series in its first scene.

I'm loving how they're shaking up they dynamics this season. Will behind bars was great last episode, and it continues to be so in this episode as well. I love that he's already starting to play his own games with Hannibal, by pretending to be concerned about the possibility of his own guilt. Also, I'm glad to see the supporting characters having a more prominent role in this episode, especially Jack and Du Maurier (this was easily her best episode IMO).
2
Reply
Flag
lol, glad to know I'm not the only one who watched through my fingers!
13
Reply
Flag
For the last "tear", I shut my eyes completely.
9
Reply
Flag
me to
7
Reply
Flag

Separated at birth?:




Its all about the neck!

24
Reply
Flag
Isn't the deer thing supposed to be Hannibal's face?
2
Reply
Flag
yep
1
Reply
Flag
I dont know. I mean I never got a good enough look at it.
Reply
Flag

are you sure thats hannibal because it looks like a woman. the one with the suit and tie is definitely hannibal. or perhaps both are hannibal and they just look different?
1
Reply
Flag
What the hell is that deer woman anyway? Will's "Dark Passenger"?
2
Reply
Flag
Will's mental image of Hannibal
4
Reply
Flag
the copycat theory really explains a lot.
Reply
Flag
In the beginning I had associated it with hobbs, so I wondered why it was even still around after all this time. Now it makes a little more sense with it morphing into hannibal. Now I'm gonna have to watch season one again.
1
Reply
Flag
One explanation could be because Hannibal copycatted Hobbs, and as Will began suspecting him, the stag started transforming.
2
Flag
why does he have antlers?
Reply
Flag
how do you not know why he has antlers have you never seen the first season ??
1
Flag
The stag started appearing when he was thinking about Gareth Jacob Hobbs and it slowly morphed into the Hannibal stag we see now.
1
Flag
"I've reached the limits of my efficacy " if only other therapists or proffesionals in general ; would ever think like that; it would save many not only time but also unneccesary tears.
7
Reply
Flag
I've only had one doctor tell me that ever.
1
Reply
Flag
Love the classical music bits : it adds to the artistic aspect of the show.
. It feels that Du Maurier's exit was a bit quick but I'm glad she figured Hannibal was a killer and the fact that she told Will she knew he was innocent.
I've always liked Beverly so I'm glad to see her increased part in the show.

1
Reply
Flag
What a blood curling episode. The part where the guy escapes was terrifying..imagine waking up next up sown into a mosaic of dead bodies. I was eating my dinner at the time, maybe I should save my dinner for later.
11
Reply
Flag
I was eating too...
1
Reply
Flag
Yeah I was eating tacos at the time.
3
Reply
Flag
I had hot dogs.
Reply
Flag
For me what made it worse was each time he tore away a piece of his skin, I was in the middle of biting my taco and hearing not only the tear of the skin, but also the crunch of the lettuce as I bit into the Taco.
1
Flag
This episode reminded me of that time I had to get stitches when I was a kid...

Anyone else think of Buffalo Bill when they heard the line about the "person suit"? And then Will was setting up quid pro quo from within his cell.
3
Reply
Flag
Actually, the first thing that came to mind was Donnie Darko.
"Why are you wearing that stupid man suit?"
1
Reply
Flag
They have to get Ted Levine on the show to play Buffalo Bill again. Those lines were too perfect. I just hope they make some allusion to his scene "It puts the lotion the basket."
Reply
Flag
Bedelia repeatedly used the term in regards to Hannibal although I would assume she has no familiarity with the Buffalo Bill thing which would happen sometime in the future timeline of these stories/movies/shows when Hannibal has long been incarcerated. While Bill was literally making a "person suit"or more specifically a "woman suit" your attention to it reminds me of the Sopranos episode where Bobby "Bacala" Baccalieri says to Tony Soprano "You got the hunchback of Notre Dame and then you got the quaterback of Notre Dame, you never think about that? The back thing?"
Reply
Flag
Tv/movie gore really don't bother me but that opening did get me a bit I have to admit. And it was very fun how both Jack and Hannibal could figure out that Beverly had been consulting with Will like wait you didn't figure that out lol, but keep seeing him we have to figure this stuff out. Oh and Dr Maurier I'm sure an email or text will do next time since you already know Hannibal is a psycho even if it is at risk of being eaten she still feels it the right thing to do to break it off with a pateint in person.

6
Reply
Flag
Could of sent him a singing telegram to focus any residual feelings he has about severing their therapy, although it would probably be considered rude and he doesn't care very much for rude people [ingredients].
1
Reply
Flag
As always, an absolutely brilliant show, from start to finish, with no second wasted. Both extremely artistic and compelling, this show is absolutely tops on my list at the moment. And the consistency is amazing -- I love how Hannibal wears his suit and tie even under the plastic suit! Classic.
19
Reply
Flag
Exactly, Hannibal could wear just simple disposable overalls that lab technicians wear to prevent evidence and they would probably easy for him to procure working with the FBI [and probably easier to explain if caught wearing it] but the space bag he wears over the suit is just so jaw droppingly surreal visually against all the backgrounds I love it. I feel sorry for Mads, it must be boiling in that costume but he can cry into his bags of money, just keep delivering the fantastic weirdness.
6
Reply
Flag
That human leg look so delicious.
8
Reply
Flag
What was the relevance of the perfume bottle?
1
Reply
Flag
Hannibal broke into Dr. Du Maure's house to presumably kill her. He found her bottle of perfume inside her house, and got a memory of her.

Hannibal is very keenly attuned to smell.
1
Reply
Flag
Not exactly - she clearly left it there in a very obvious place for him to find. But why? What message was she trying to send?
2
Reply
Flag
Good point. I can only guess it was her way to say to Hannibal 'I got one over you' by displaying the perfume so obviously so Hannibal would for sure find it.
Reply
Flag
I had it in my head—though now I can't remember exactly why—that the perfume was a gift from Hannibal. Certainly with Hannibal's basically superhuman sense of smell, it would be an appropriate one.

I've been in a mind recently to re-watch Season 1. If I do, I'll keep a look out.
3
Reply
Flag
Ugh, that opener. I was briefly euphoric when Roland seemed to be, mangled as he was, jumping to freedom. Euphoria was quickly squashed (yikes) by that horrible sound of impact on the rocks just before seeing him staring dead-eyed up at his murderer. Full on horrified.

I was glad Roland still managed to tell the tale that ended the murderer's 'art', even in death. And I actually laughed at the, "What happened to his leg" montage, because I was like, "Yes, Hannibal, braise that bastard!" My emotions!

Du Maurier better have an "In Case of Being Made into a Sammich" scorched earth plan at the ready, because she was kind of ridiculous this ep. Fabulous and ridiculous.

And I'm fully prepared for Will to piss on Hannibal at some point in this season. It follows Chekov's Gun Theory, heh. Whether Hannibal finds it rude or not is debatable.
6
Reply
Flag
MY EMOTIONS! MY EMOTIONS!!!
2
Reply
Flag
I was like Urrghh here we go..... the old got out of the car just in time, hunt through the cornfields, a close escape from being shot and then the jump to freedom from a cliff face into the river cliche,.... but no....! OUch!!
1
Reply
Flag
One thing that a;ways impresses me with this show is the use of light.
17
Reply
Flag
*always
Reply
Flag
It wasn't just Du Maurier's final line to Will that made her character so intriguing in this episode, but the whole final scene when she escapes Hannibal and basically tells him she knows he's a killer was incredibly artistic.
36
Reply
Flag
Their feet were telling us the story. Beautifully done ! It was like seeing a Hitchcock movie.
Reply
Flag
Anyone think Hannibal is going to be on the run in the next season ?or will Hannibal eat Morpheus how is cannibalism bad and most humans(animals,mammals) eat other animals organs ...
Reply
Flag
I've heard season 3 will be some sort of Fugitive season. With Hannibal on the run.
Reply
Flag
That leg roast sure did look good.
7
Reply
Flag
I know his meals alway look fantastic ewwwwwww such a beautiful presentation. I hate how good he makes it look lol
2
Reply
Flag
They hired a special person just for the food, which is why they look so amazing
1
Reply
Flag
I am not sure I am ever going to be able to eat roasts again.
11
Reply
Flag
I apologize if this gets into the philosophical.

"The color of our skin is so often politicized. It will almost be refreshing to see someone revel in the aesthetics for aesthetic’s sake, if it weren't so horrific." I really sort of hated this line, as aesthetics ARE political. It's not an accident, after all, that the Umber's escape felt very much like a slave fleeing a plantation, bloodied from breaking his own chains, chased by a white man through a rural area.

I felt Hannibal's thought on the aesthetic was an appropriate line. You're right that there were too many allusions to slavery in that context. Hell, this must have been one of the most awkwardly racist things to film. But when they broke it down to colors in a painting or crayons in a crayola box, maybe we were suppose to distance ourselves from race and not make it a political matter. What makes an aesthetic political to begin with? We do. We make that association and ascribe that onto our daily interactions.

Instead of markedly comparing our racial differences, maybe we were supposed to enjoy what makes ourselves beautiful regardless of one characteristic versus another. (Because, "in the eyes of 'God,'" we're all special).

To hammer that in even more, this episode was about identity and how we are perceived. Will Graham is perceived by his friends and co-workers as a killer. They ended up politicizing the nature of their relationships to him. Anything associated with Graham, to them, was the mind of a "killer." Beverly was afraid to get too close to Will. Jack didn't even want to see him. And Alana doesn't believe him, but will outright lie to him that she does. The moment Scully confessed to him that she believed him helped to reinforce his own identity and give him the thought that what made him special was that he wasn't a killer.

More+
17
Reply
Flag
"there were too many allusions to slavery in that context."

What the F#$?! This is the first time I read someone saying this and damn, you guys are damaged. It never occurred to me that a black man running in a field of corn was a supposedly "obvious" allusion to slavery.

I just saw a man trying to survive. Now I feel corrupted.
6
Reply
Flag
Yeah that pretty much sums up how I now feel about it once I saw the comments on here.
Reply
Flag
Perfectly articulated.
I totally agree.
Reply
Flag
Staff
As someone whose review of a cartoon was gently poked at for being philosophical, you needn't ever apologize for getting philosophical, at least not in comment threads for reviews I write. In any case, I'm glad it spurred you on to leave a comment and share your perspective. I wanted a discussion on this. :)

Which leads to my reply: We do make aesthetics political, as you said, and we do it by creating a standard that puts things in a tidy hierarchy. This creates all sorts of social and cultural repercussions and counter-movements to redefine things, sometimes getting swallowed into the standard, other times the standard being replaced with another.

I take your point about distancing from race and not making it a political matter (and Fuller himself made mention of that line in the Nerdist Writers podcast, and followed up with saying this was something he also believed)...but that type of discourse is, for me, a slippery slope of post-racial thought that wants to ignore/eschew differences (and how those differences have led to systematic issues of discrimination and representation in various aspects of (and I'm purposefully limiting myself here) the U.S., from culture to justice) in favor of a more comfortable, easier to navigate world. It's a nice, pie-in-the-sky idea, but I think it does more harm than good when the current structures of society are not built to support it. It may be something to strive for, but I'm not entirely sure who it would ultimately provide the most benefit to.

I dig the identity as killer reading you do, and I would take it a step further to tie it back to an issue of race: Even if Will is cleared of charges, the label of "serial killer" and "guy who spent some time in an asylum" is going to linger around him for the rest of his life, influence how he is perceived and how he perceives things.
More +
4
Reply
Flag
after reading a few more of your posts, i will be labeled an acolyte. however, i could not agree with you more. somehow people confuse not being blind of someone's differences as being an impediment to celebrating the person as a unique individual and embracing symmetry where it appears.

i am not a blonde white woman, but when i witnessed dr. lecter subtly threatening dr. dumarier, i felt her anxiety and fear and i wanted her to be in a safe space away from this monster. i am always suspicious of people who claim to be colorblind or swear on stacks of korans, bibles and talmuds and books of buddha that they do not see when someone is diffrent from themselves. what i find more life-affirming is when i can be from nigeria and i can meet a young man from holland and we both realize that we have a huge affinity for alfred hitchcock movies and rate them almost exactly the same on our favorite list. that is an example of human beings having symmetry despite an outward appearance of difference. however, there is nothing noble in pretending that someone is not who they are whether that identification is along racial or sexual lines. human symmetry lies in an openness of spirits and not disclaimers of not noticing that the other has superficial differences.
More +
1
Reply
Flag
Agreed.

I never said to cast a blind eye on race. What I was trying to show was that in the context of this episode, while there may be allusions to slavery, the episode's focus was on the aesthetic, not the political overtones of that aesthete.
Reply
Flag
I absolutely agree with your thoughts. I wasn't trying to propagate a "blind eye" on the issue of race. Ignoring differences is a slippery slope. Race is subject to a lot of environmental factors that mold artificially or through de facto circumstances. Going through any metropolitan area, you can see that often times, the issue of racial disparity, in the economic and social sense, is still troubled with problems.

It's hard to separate that history from the opening scene, but ultimately I think the point of the episode was to separate ourselves from our perceived notions of identity. For Will Graham, he was trying to separate the idea that he was a killer from who he was.

On the issue of race, which I didn't really expand upon because threads like these can be barraged with racist comments, race and problems associated with it (ranging from the US jailing system to the Zimmerman case) are inherently bad and should be addressed, not sensationalized. Rather than make that jump, I was trying to show that making comparisons against others based on facial features or the color of our skin (making judgments on beauty or the extreme differences in our characteristics) is not something to be lauded.

Instead of that, what I was proposing was that we cherish what makes us inherently unique to ourselves. Just because we may have different skin tones, a crooked nose, or slanted eyes, doesn't ultimately mean we are more or less beautiful (or any other distinction: eg. kind or meritorious) than others.

Noel, thank you for your insight. I wasn't expecting such an in depth discussion. I love your thought that even if Will gets out of prison, he'll continue to have that stigma on him. It ties back neatly with racial identity in our criminal justice system. Being known as a "prisoner" or having served time has negative side effects on people's identity. And in a way, this ties back even further to Will's damaged psyche.
More +
1
Reply
Flag
Staff
I'm tracking you now. I wasn't at all suggesting you were casting a blind eye, but rather that I still feel that the show's sentiment is can lead us to casting a blind eye, even if that wasn't its intent (which very likely wasn't) but can still create elisions that may not do people any favors. It is -- again -- a nice idea, but a slippery one.

I started re-reading Invisible Man a week or so ago (nearly done), and there's a great section in the book where the protagonist is introduced to a group called The Brotherhood (they're basically communists, but that goes unstated), and one of their members, upon meeting the protagonist, asks him to sing for them. One of the Brotherhood's leader is emphatic that the protagonist does not sing simply because he is black.

The protagonist, in the narration, acknowledges the racism of the man's assumption that all black people are wonderful singers, but he also acknowledges the fact that there should be a way to ask him, and other black people, to sing without it being perceived as a racist overture. It's an excellent demonstration of how race influences our thinking and our culture, even down to our discussion in these comments, including my reading of the opening and yours, DesolaKazeem, and EsmeBuffy's points above that just because the show organized itself in that way doesn't mean it wanted it perceived that way, and that wouldn't it be good if there was a way for it not be read that way?
More +
2
Reply
Flag
Interesting insight. We can't fully discuss race without discussing it in those terms. I see what you did there. Race has shaped the course of this discussion. In the world of Abed Nadir, this is totally "meta."

I haven't read Ellison since high school. I definitely must reread that.

Great points overall.
Flag
oh my god @noel kirkpatrick. i was going to do my own analysis, but you handle your words with the precision of hannibal lecter creating his gourmet human delights. i think i shall keep my comments to myself lest they should look uncomely in the shadow of your splendid descriptions.

you hit the nail right on the head when you described the opening scene in comparison to an escaped slave. i thought exactly the same thing and i got all emotional. it was hard for me to stick with the scene especially when i noticed that one of the other african-americans was still alive watching his brother captive escape.

i am so naive. i somehow thought that hannibal had some modicum of feeling for dr. du maurier, but i guess his sense of self-preservation is greater. before i saw him in his killer suit in her empty home i thought there was going to be some grisly demise in store for her and i just could not bear to see that. i am still traumatized from gillian anderson's character being brutalized, raped and psychologically and physically scarred in the 2007 movie closure. ever since i saw lovely elizabeth montgomery who i had grown up watching play the bewitching samantha stephens get raped and beaten in a post-betwitched abc television movie called, cry rape where she is raped twice by the same man, i just cannot watch my favorite actresses be brutalized onscreen. i find it upsetting and deeply disturbing.

there is nothing on television like hannibal and i even include dexter although i abandoned dexter after the second season. hannibal is so dark because it implies that human souls remarkably, innately dark. when i watch hannibal i feel that so-called goodness in the world may just be a sham. i loved how will described friendship as symmetry. i think there are so many people who lack symmetry in their lives.

thanks again noel for your penetrating insights and commentary.
More+
10
Reply
Flag
Staff
Please, please don't let my review keep you from leaving thoughts on an episode. :)
Reply
Flag
What an insightful review. I thought of the mural that the killer was creating was similar to Hannibal's kills. All of them a work of art, he copied the other killers (artists) but added a twist, making it his own design. The only one who saw the differences was Will. Just as Will saw that something was out of place in the "mural" and recognized the signature of Hannibal's design. Will trying to piece together, his memory with his friends doubting him. Beverly Katz, seeking out Will because he is the best at what he does in getting into the minds of the killers, but obviously afraid to get too close to him. Will seeking an ally and finding it in an unexpected place, Dr. Du Maurier. Will needs to weave a design of his own, to convince Jack, Beverly and Alana of his innocence, expose Hannibal, and free himself.
7
Reply
Flag
But if he were to do that I can only imagine Hannibal slowly perverting that design into something.... delicious.
Reply
Flag
True, it is a dangerous game Will is playing changing his tactics and asking for Hannibal's help. His mind is very pliable, it is what makes him so good and so vulnerable. Hannibal's hubris may be his undoing, he wants Will to know him, to empathize and become him and that may make it harder for him to see Will's true motive is to entrap Hannibal. And yes, if Will isn't careful he may become the entree' someday.
Reply
Flag
but that's why scully said she and will were "lucky". his conquests usually die so being in crazy jail and not getting munched on is his way of being nice, but he still wants to nibble them a little. he's playing with his potential food. he's batting it around like a cat with a spider
Reply
Flag
Hmmm. Hannibal as a cat person? Well Mads did play a Bond villain. It is possible that he strokes a cat while he sits in a veiled chair.
2
Flag
Load More Comments
Follow this Show
Members
6,720