Have Gun - Will Travel

Season 4 Episode 15

The Mountebank

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Aired Saturday 9:30 PM Dec 24, 1960 on CBS
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The Mountebank
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After being forced to put down his lamed horse, Paladin joins up with puppeteer Jack Burnaby, who is traveling to Fort Pawnee to put on a show. Senator George "Pawnee" Croft, who is in line for the White House, is at the fort. Paladin learns that the mysterious puppeteer has a second agenda where the Senator is concerned.moreless

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    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (1)

      • Richard Boone's young son, Peter, introduced as the boy on crutches, starred as one of the children living at the fort, and is listed in the credits.

    • QUOTES (3)

      • Paladin: I'd be obliged to you for a ride.
        Burnaby: I'd be obliged if you'd drive these miracles of Nature for me.
        Paladin: How far you going?
        Burnaby: The end of the line.
        Paladin: Oh, where's that?
        Burnaby: That all depends.
        Paladin: Depends on what?
        Burnaby: Whether you believe in Heaven?

      • Paladin: You know him?
        Burnaby: The hero of Pawnee Creek? Why, every schoolboy in the nation know of his famous victory.
        Paladin: "But what good came of it at last? quoth little Peterkin. Why, that I cannt say, said he, but 'twas a famous victory."
        Burnaby: Do I understand, sir, you have some reservations about the greatest and most glorious Indian fighter since General Armstrong Custer?

      • Burnaby: I'm a lonely man, Mr. Paladin. Grant me a few childish amusements.
        Paladin: Oh, free amusements? And no magic potions to sell?
        Burnaby: There are men in the world who receive adequate reward from the happy laughter of innocent children.
        Paladin: That's true, Burnaby. But you're not one of them.
        Burnaby: Oh, what leads you to that shocking conclusion?
        Paladin: For one thing--this. (Shows his card) You've been picking my pockets, Burnaby? And for another thing...this. (Picks up the Pawnee Croft puppet) Now, Burnaby, you didn't come all this way to meddle in state politics.
        Burnaby: Hah! Politics! I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
        Paladin: Burnaby, if you make a fool of him, the General is perfectly capable of pulling a gun and shooting you down in front of everybody.
        Burnaby:(Laughs) He does have a vile temper, doesn't he?
        Paladin: Why do you want him to kill you?
        Burnaby: Kill me? Hah! D'you think he'd do such a shocking thing as that? What about his political ambition? You know de Quincey. "A man indulge himself in murder, soon cares little for robbing and--"
        Paladin: "And from robbing he comes to Sabbath breaking, and drinking, and from there to procrastination and incivility."
        Burnaby: Mr. Paladin. In countries less barbaric than ours, isn't it the custom for the guest to avenge the death of his host? You have been a guest under my roof.

    • NOTES (1)

    • ALLUSIONS (2)

      • Paladin's quotation regarding "little Peterkin" comes from a poem by Robert Southey (1774-1843) called "The Battle of Blenheim" (1798)

        "And everybody praised the duke, Who this great fight did win."
        "But what good came of it at last?" quoth little Peterkin.
        "Why, that I cannot tell" said he;
        "But 'twas a famous victory."

        The poem regards an old man, Kaspar, who tells the tale of a great battle after a child brings him a skull found out in the fields.

      • Burnaby speaks of "de Quincey". He is referring to Thomas de Quincey (1785-1859)

        "If once a man indulges himself in murder, very soon he comes to think little of robbing, and from robbing he comes next to drinking and Sabbath breaking, and from that to incivility and procrastination." --from "Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts" (1827)

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