Hawaii Five-O

Season 1 Episode 4

Strangers In Our Own Land

2
Aired Thursday 8:00 PM Oct 03, 1968 on CBS
7.8
out of 10
User Rating
28 votes
1

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Episode Summary

EDIT
While investigating the assassination of a native-Hawaiian official, McGarrett learns that some fellow Hawaiians resented the victim's pro-development policies.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A land development official is killed by a car bomb, and the issue of overcrowding in the islands rears its ugly head.

    8.0
    Hawaii scenery/landmarks: The Honolulu International Airport. The construction area at the final scene looks a lot like the Mililani-Waipio-Waipahu area before those suburbs were built. Fisherman's Warf still looks the same, but there is a restaurant where that bar used to be, or is the bar still there? Ben Kalua's nightclub reminds me of the Luau business on Koapaka/Ualena Street (near the airport) that I used to deliver Menehune Water to in the late 80's.



    Notable Stars: Simon Oakland always looked like a local Hawaiian to me. In this episode he plays nightclub owner Ben Kalua (Kahlua is the name of a coffee-based liquor). He also had a decent speaking role as a cop in the classic 1961 movie West Side Story. In 1974-75 he appeared regularly as Kolchak's boss on The Night Stalker. Hawaii entertainer Danny Kaleikini plays one of Kalua's thugs, which is a sharp contrast to Kalaeikini's real-life sunny and happy public personna. He gets shot by McGarrett on the beach - classic. Hilo Hattie (the famous Hawaii cookie lady and Aloha shirt/dress maker!) plays the mother of the suspected bomber.



    It is interesting that there was a land development and overcrowding issue back in 1968, when many look back on that time nostalgically before several concrete towers took over and became the norm as Japanese outsiders purchased much of the real estate (Waikiki, Ala Moana, Kahala, etc). Was the show reflecting current issues, or was it accurately looking into the future? Hawaii (especially Oahu) has been getting much too overcrowded since the 80's and it's almost unbearable to live in now with all the long lines of traffic everywhere (which is why I moved). A lot of Hawaiians also have a recurring sovereignty issue since political correctness gave them both headway and a soapbox in the 90's. Basically many want something for nothing, which is a whole 'nodda story. The few very wealthy (and greedy) Hawaiians own Bishop Estate and the majority of land (are the Japanese foreign investors catching them up?) while many poor Hawaiians live in tents on the beach. The average Hawaiian with a job is a respectable citizen like everyone else, but those who just sit home and suck on the ice pipe certainly do not deserve any land handouts.



    Regardless of all the politics, I loved the scenery reflected in this episode of the islands while it was still innocent. Those times were no ka oi!moreless
Jack Lord

Jack Lord

Steve McGarrett

James MacArthur

James MacArthur

Danny "Danno" Williams

Kam Fong

Kam Fong

Chin Ho Kelly

Zulu

Zulu

Kono Kalakaua

Jeanne Bates

Jeanne Bates

Grace Willis

Guest Star

Milton Hibdon

Milton Hibdon

Saunders

Guest Star

Danny Kaleikini

Danny Kaleikini

Kamaki

Guest Star

Richard Denning

Richard Denning

Governor Paul Jameson

Recurring Role

Maggi Parker

Maggi Parker

May

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (2)

    • At the end of the first act when McGarrett answers a call in his car, his car radio has a receiver that actually looks like a telephone receiver. This is the only appearance of that prop in the series.

    • Kono's hair in the final scenes of this episode reveal sloppy editing. When he's shown in a shot with McGarrett, his hair is in disarray. When he is shown in a close-up where he quotes the episode's title, his hair is combed. The final shot shows Kono with McGarrett and again his hair is disheveled.

  • QUOTES (1)

  • NOTES (4)

    • Additional credits:

      Automobiles furnished by Ford Motor Company
      Production assistance and consideration provided by United Airlines
      Filmed entirely on location in Hawaii
      A Leonard Freeman Production in association with the CBS Television Network

    • Both Hilo Hattie (Mrs. Kapali) and Danny Kaleikini (Kamaki) were popular musical performers in Hawaii. They even performed together as musical entertainers. Hilo Hattie was known for her comic hula style in songs like "Princess Pupule Has Plenty Papayas" and "When Hilo Hattie Does the Hula Hop," quite a contrast with her soulful appearance as the heartbroken Mrs. Kapali in this episode. Danny Kaleikini performed at the Kahala Hilton (now Mandarin Oriental) for 30 years. He was also known for his charity work.

    • The official syndication number for this episode is 6802.

    • Danny Kaleikini (Kamaki) was mistakenly credited as Danny Kaleikine.

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

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