A Helix Community
Syfy (ended 2015)

Helix S01E01 / E02: "Pilot" / "Vector"

Look, if the theme song to Helix is going to be some upbeat Burt Bacharach-style elevator jam, then obviously the team behind Syfy's new horror-thriller Helix aren't taking the show entirely too seriously and recognize their show can also be fun. The producers, who include Ronald D. Moore (Battlestar Galactica), Steven Maeda (Lost), and Javier Grillo-Marxuach (Lost), know what they have in Helix: a claustrophobic spookfest dripping with black goo. And if they aren't going to take things entirely seriously, then I won't either, because I think that's exactly how Helix is meant to be watched.

Because even though Helix has the chance to be the best Syfy original since Battlestar Galactica (I'd put Being Human in that spot right now), if you didn't take it seriously, how else would you be able to get through dumb dialogue like this:

Julia: "Can you at least tell me what Peter was working on?"
Dr. Hatake: "Mutagens, mostly."
Julia: "For speeding up mutations. Those are dangerous."
Dr. Hatake: "You wouldn't want to let your children play with them. Do you have children?" 

My ears tried to secede from my face when I heard that. But this is a Syfy original, and if you expect the same style of smooth pleasantries as Justified, you're on the wrong channel. Clunkers come with the territory. So does bad acting (it's present here) and rehashed concepts (again, present). It's what Helix did with what it had that has me eager to watch more.

The two-hour debut introduced us to the main story: a group of Center for Disease Control scientists are sent up to a high-tech research facility in the Arctic (I'm not sure if it's explained why the facility is all the way up there other than the fact that no one bothers them because braving sub-zero temperatures isn't worth making sure rules are followed) to investigate a possible viral outbreak. The rest of the story unfolds as expected, except probably a lot slower. The CDC scientists arrived at the facility, the scientists already at the facility are really cagey about what they're doing, there are a lot of people purposefully not answering questions directly asked of them, the CDC scientists begin to realize that some questionable experiments are being conducted, and best of all, people start getting infected and turn into puddles of black goop. All of this was filled out like a Viral Outbreak Movies edition of Mad Libs, with only the names of the players and behaviors of the virus changed. 

Instead, Helix seems like a project for the people behind the camera to show off. The only thing left to really distinguish Helix from our grizzled expectations of another show or movie about people getting sick was atmosphere, and Helix nailed it. The last half or so of the pilot was fantastic as the real star of the show–the moody research facility (apologies Billy Campbell's Dr. Alan Farragut)–scared the pants off me. And it's because Helix is technically and stylistically one of the best new things on television. Allow me to geek out a bit.

The cinematography is flat-out outstanding. Inspired by space-station aesthetics, the Arctic Biosystems facility is antiseptic and personality-free. The place hardly feels lived in, which adds to the inherent claustrophobia of working several stories below the surface of what is Hell on Earth. Hospitals look like the Bellagio compared to this place. Long shots of corridors magnify the emptiness that resides inside the mega-lab, accentuating the scariest fact of working at this expensive dump: the scientists are entirely cut off from everything else, so that if anything does go wrong, or I dunno, some infection that causes internal organs to liquify goes rampant, it'll take a long time before an ambulance shows up with a bunch of Band-Aids.

But what really struck me, and I don't know if this was intentional or not, was how the cinematography changed as the virus or whatever bug was causing problems mutated. The pilot hour had an emphasis on symmetry and centered, focused shots.  But as the virus progressed (a shot through a microscope showed it turning nice spherical cells into spiked balls of death) in the second hour "Vector," so too did the perspective of the camera. Those tidy corridor shots became angled and asymmetrical.

This was a typical Shining-esque walking-down-a-corridor shot from the pilot (I've cropped all these images to fit on the site, but I've kept the center of the shot consistent with what was broadcast):

This was walking down a corridor in "Vector":


When Alan was chasing Peter through the vents in the pilot, the tunnels seemed to go on forever. When Balleseros was chasing Peter through the same vents in the second episode, things were cut off. The result was a feeling of change that went beyond the insides of the infected. The whole damn place seemed to be changing as the mood shifted toward fear and danger.

This was a head-on-shot of Alan and his point of view in the vents from the pilot:



Notice how he's staring straight ahead into the camera in the first shot, and how the vent he's crawling through seems to go on forever in the second. Now look at the shit Balleseros had to go through. Again, a head-on shot and his POV:



It's all twisted and finite, as though the walls are closing in or the place is turning itself into a pretzel. As if everything is slowly mutating. So even if the dialogue isn't well-thought-out, the cinematography appears to be. There were also small stylistic choices all over the place that emphasized the dichotomy between the two groups of scientists. Like this:

Gorgeous, clean, and impeccably measured, right? But notice that the two scientists from the CDC (Julia and Sarah) who don't know what the F is going on are in the foreground, which is symmetrical and evenly split. Now look at the background, where Hatake and his security detail are looking on through that bubble-shaped window. That's off-center, and it should be; those jerks are in cahoots with the virus (probably). 

There was also a scene in the second episode when Alan was trying to talk those crazy (and possibly) infected scientists into not being so crazy and hostage happy. These scenes were intercut with Julie examining the rats that were being experimented on. They did a neat trick here: the rats were all in cages, obviously, but did you notice that several shots of the scientists in the hostage situation were shot from behind glass? As if THEY were the subjects of some sick experimentation? Am I looking too far into this? Maybe. But this is how I watch TV! 

And how about that final scene from the pilot, you know the one I'm talking about. When Peter is moving in slow-motion with the severed arm to gain access to another wing of the lab. Scary and beautiful. There's also repeated use of what I call stutter shots but someone with better knowledge of cinematography calls a different and more correct term, where quick edits in similar framing give the illusion of jumping while dialogue continues to flow. The scene where Julia and Alan are suiting up in the pilot was a great example of this, and it's a nice touch. What does it mean? I don't know, but it looks cool.

Audio was also used well. There was a minimal score that popped up every once in a while, but the symphony of humming machines, particularly in that great stretch of the pilot's second half, created the best aural atmosphere. Helix is a show that demands Surround Sound, and don't be afraid to crank it up. 

But those treats for the senses can't completely erase the show's problems. Some acting is robotic (though Campbell is good), the dialogue feels like an unchecked first draft, and the viral story offered nothing different from what we've experienced before. I don't even think there's much to discuss about the plot so far because so little has happened. There was also the deal of that weird love triangle storylines between Peter, Julia, and Alan, and Sarah, Julia, and Alan. Do I really believe in a potential romance between 26-year-old Sarah and what, 40 or 50-year old Alan? Not really. Has it paid any dividends yet in the first two hours. Nope, except for that final shower scene between Julia and Peter. 

But Helix is all about setting the right mood and paying attention to the little things. After two hours, there's still barely any movement on the virus plot. There's a virus! And maybe it's a really old virus, or maybe it was created by Hatake. But the show is so damned fun to watch because of its escapist atmosphere that the slow-burning story is easily overlooked. There's time for the rest of Helix to come around, but it appears that the scientists behind the camera are the real stars of the show. 


NOTES


– You know the drill, if someone is puking, I'm GIFing it! Especially if they puke inside a helmet. I love people puking in helmets.

– I haven't heard what the show's future is on Syfy, but unless something really big is down the line, I don't see how this could go much longer than a season or two. 

– Why were the frozen monkeys outside? Did Hatake just chuck out the dead ones, or were they sent out there alive?

– UGH all that painful exposition backstory from the first 25 minutes, especially that helicopter ride, was tough to get through.

– Rule #1 of sci-fi science station shows: dead or sick people always have a vidlog!

– Obviously Hatake is behind things, as evidenced by the opening when he gives Peter some water and notes that his infection–and the fact that he didn't instantly die from his innards leaking out of every orifice–is "progress." 

– What are your theories behind the virus?


Previously Aired Episode

AIRED ON 4/10/2015

Season 2 : Episode 13

236 Comments
Comments (236)
Submit
Sort: Latest | Popular
In the second paragraph you wrote "Because even though Helix has the chance to be the best Syfy original since Battlestar Galactica (I'd put Being Human in that spot right now)." The Being Human you are referring to is an American copy of the British BBC series, therefore NOT a Syfy original. As a reporter please check your facts before printing.
Reply
Flag
Just started watching this I found to be quite good sometimes with the virus shows they can be quite stodgy and inchorent , but this one moved at a good pace. A suspect that the virus is either alien or a old one from biblical times.
1
Reply
Flag
I'm going to say this, YET again: It's the beginning of a series. It is inevitable that there are going to be problems, and errors, and complications. It's always likely that certain aspects of each episode are going to be re-shot and effects changed or altered.

The pilot of a series is to introduce the viewers to the concept and premise of the show.

The second episode of a series is to BEGIN to expand on the pilot.

This is why the 'four episode test' is important, because, by the fourth episode (NORMALLY), the series starts escalating and building and developing at an increased pace.

No one can get into a 747 for the first time, and fly around the world like they've been a commercial pilot for 30 years - The same concept applies to new TV series.

For the nay-sayers and trashers out there, and in the comments below, dwell on what I've said, and then watch the double ep premiere again.
1
Reply
Flag
Side note: Did anyone else notice the nod to BSG at about 9 minutes 25 seconds into the pilot?

"This is gonna be the most fracked up family reunion ever."
2
Reply
Flag
Meh! After 20 minutes of this show I tuned out. I tried because of Ronald D. Moore (BSG rocked majorly) but you can't always back a winner. After reading the first couple of paragraphs of this review I've decided to give this another go with the view to not taking it seriously, see how that works out for me.

I'll be back to finish reading.
Reply
Flag
Outbreak, scifi mystery, possible zombies/aliens/mutants inspired plot, and lots of snow. I love it cause it does really reminds me of The Thing by John Carpenter. The pilot doesnt really has its 'OMG, never saw that coming' moments but hoping other episodes will have that.
I agree with Tim. The whole outbreak plot thing seems good for 1 or 2 season. It will be amazing if this the writers will be able to make it interesting beyond that.
Reply
Flag
This show may not be anywhere near accurate in its portrayal of arctic life, scientific research or much else presented....but I enjoyed it immensely. I've certainly seen better shows, but I'll keep watching for now. I'm a sucker for this type of horror tho too, so I'm prbly a lil more forgiving then others would be.
2
Reply
Flag
As a biochemist, I can testify to its near-complete ignorance of all things biological. They got almost everything wrong, and every time they got something right and raised my hopes of seeing something within a light-year of reasonable, they immediately buried it in giant, steaming piles of nonsense. I've got no problem with writers invoking the Rule of Cool when they need to, but these folks didn't even make an effort at getting their facts straight, and that I find moderately annoying.

Still, it was the constant Idiot Ball-juggling I'm reluctant to call a plot and the incredible obnoxiousness of all the "civilians" that truly made the show an exercise in frustration for me. My jaw ached from all the teeth-grinding by the time the credits started rolling.
3
Reply
Flag
Staff
Nailed the environment, casting, errie feel.
Script needs work. Story is okay but not very intruiging (yet).
Reply
Flag
I've been leery on getting into new showssince Cult and Almost Human became serious let-downs, but this one pleasantly surprised me. I did kind of zone out in places, when it began to drag here and there, or when the dialogue got a bit painful to tolerate but on the whole, but by the end, I was definitely interested to see more, to see where they take it. It's a good blend of The Thing and 28 Days Later, and if the show can get over the beginning expository hump and get a decent character-driven psychological spook-fest going, it could have a good future. And it was nice finding out someone at work watched as well and liked it. I didn't know how much I'd missed the Lost-esque "water cooler" chats until I had that conversation today.
Reply
Flag
I like the show and I've seen episode 3 as well, you can watch it on Syfy webpage, someone came up with an interesting theory that makes sense to me, that Hatake isn't a bad guy, that's just a red herring, he's actually one of the good guys, 1 he's doing everything he can to keep the CDC at the station, 2 he's got those eyes he's hiding from everyone, I hate to say it but the virus is black, his eyes are white, could it really be that simple, kinda racist but still a good theory and he obviously doesn't trust his right hand man, which means he's probably some sort of under cover good guy that wants to stop whatever is going on with the virus he just has to be careful who he trusts. The third episode was good, but now that I've seen it do I have to wait two weeks to see episode 4, if so that will suck :(
Reply
Flag
Sounds like "The Thing" movie converted in a show on 2014! :)
2
Reply
Flag
It was okay, but not great. It's not different or original, but I guess it has some potential. It felt like an X-Files episode.
1
Reply
Flag
I really didn't like this one. I had high hopes for it but the dialogue in places was laughable. I felt like they have the same writers who wrote The Fast and Furious. They would say the same thing to two different people in the span of five minutes. I watched the first two episodes but will not be returning for the third.
1
Reply
Flag
Thats a shame cuz I personally enjoyed the 3rd ep (its online already) more then the first two... I felt like the tension really started to build, and there was a lot less ridiculous dialogue. I think this show will get much better a lil ways in, theres many shows I thot were stupid w horrible dialogue (The vampire diaries comes to mind) but they improved as they gained their footing.
1
Reply
Flag
If I'm bored some night maybe I'll give the third episode a try :-)
Reply
Flag
This series started great! I love it already! It was a bit slow-paced, but I still don't see how this show can last several seasons unless they get a bigger plot along the way. It'll be strange to go 3+ seasons located in that same place... Anyway, I am most definitely along for the ride.

Syfy original shows always tend to be good, but the one I didn't like straight away was Bitten. Helix is a stayer, Bitten a goner.
Reply
Flag
Since the Stargate series SyFy's track record has been pretty poor but a while ago I read some guy's plea for people to give their (SyFy's) shows at least a chance and so I'm doing that. I don't believe the author of that plea was affiliated with the channel in any way.

My first impressions of Helix were mixed, and after a certain point they took a nose dive (maybe not to the very bottom, but low enough to lose most of my interest in the show). I agree with most of what bubujin_2 has listed but the thing that simply insulted me was the main characters question before the end of the first half of the pilot as to why Peter would take the security guard's hand... To hear that being said in a room with multiple people and not hearing an answer is incredibly annoying for someone who figured that out under 2 seconds after they showed the cut-off hand. I view that as an insult to the audience. Especially since it pretty much closed the first half, like the audience needed time to process that...

SyFy's original scripts are getting worse by the show in terms of dialogues which Tim here (author of this article) proves with a single quote from the show. Especially since the quality of the scene where the quote came from was pretty dependent on quality dialogue.
More+
Reply
Flag
They ran out of Monkeys when they all escaped, so had to use Human test subjects instead.
2
Reply
Flag
Very pleased to see 100% CGI monkeys and not primate actors. Good job show! Primates have no business in show business!
1
Reply
Flag
But real mice are ok?
2
Reply
Flag
So many technical things wrong that made it painful for me to watch:

  • Transport in by helicopter? I doubt it--at least not that particular type. I know the U.S. research station in Antarctica is support by Air Force airlift planes--once upon a time it was C-141s and now I believe it's primarily C-130s.
  • The show's research station is just ginormous--way too cavernous.
  • In that same vein, even the tight interior shots seem to convey very spacious quarters and working spaces.
  • Hitake-san's quarters decked out with hard-wood floors? I don't buy it.
  • With huge picture windows the heating requirements must be ridiculously outrageous.
  • Way to vary the outside shot of the research station--always the snow plow was seen in operation at the 8 o'clock position.
  • It bugs me to no end when military types can't even be represented with squared away haircuts at the very least.
  • And for the major to take his outside stroll clad in nothing more than standard-issue military gear? Riiiiight.
  • Always put your toys away in the arctic conditions. When the major was taking his first outside stroll, you could see the snow plow in the background and it was not moving. There would likely be a garage bay or storage facility for it to be parked in when not in use.
  • And in the major's second outside stroll the snowmobile dude didn't even have hat or face cover, yet he's going to try to escape--and at night?--on a 200-mile journey?
  • One of the researchers threatened to notify the newspapers. What, they lost their internet connection?
  • The CDC team seems so spread out so why don't they have some means of communicating among themselves--radio or cell phone perhaps? If this station is so huge, then I would expect the rooms to be wired with an intercom system at least.
  • I realize the station is chock full of scientists and equipment, but would it really have been equipped with ready-made isolation rooms and state-of-the-art medical support equipment? If one of the Antarctica researches goes ill, it's a major operation getting that person extracted as the facilities there cannot support any significnt medical assistance.
More+
3
Reply
Flag
I agree with all your points besides the isolation equipment. If your work is viruses and contagions you would have that equipment around "just in case". Everything else I think you are spot on in pointing out.
Reply
Flag
Yeah, I hesitated putting that in there as the research facility is working with many potent, toxic viruses and whatnot. Granted, there would undoubtedly be isolation stations and work rooms, but not somewhat spacious, ready-made (as it seemed presented to me) isolation quarters. And granted, there would certainly be some medical support gear and equipment, but sophisticated monitoring equipment for humans? Not so likely.
Reply
Flag
We still don't know the full scope of what Hitake wanted to test though so who knows what he planned for.
Reply
Flag
I was enjoying this somewhat, but there was so much ridiculous behaviour in the 3rd episode that now I don't know what to think. I guess we'll discuss this more when it airs.

Do they run psych tests on the people that work at the CDC? Cause I certainly hope so.

I still really love the muzak that plays over the opening credits :)
2
Reply
Flag
I love the muzak as well. And the copious use of Do You Know the Way to San Jose in the pilot. Fabulous! Plus whatever crazy nonsense the blond was listening to during the monkey necropsy. The blond animal lady is by far my favorite character so far. I hope she gets more screen time and doesn't get sick. She rocks!
1
Reply
Flag
I was only half-way paying attention at first but my ears perked up like a dog at the passing Marburg reference (hey, I can't help it, I really love that virus) I started paying attention after that & I liked it enough to keep going to next week. I really do like the way it looks, but I was pretty irritated by the acting & dialogue though
2
Reply
Flag
Marburg is a cool virus. Agreed!
2
Reply
Flag
Yes, Marburg is fun. Just finished reading The Cobra Event after reading The Hot Zone years and years ago.
2
Reply
Flag
The Hot Zone is where I first learned of the ebola family & the way Preston described how all those hemorrhagic nasties affect the body freaked me out to the point of complete fascination to this very day. I'm gonna have to check out the Cobra Event. I've never heard of it before...thanks for the heads-up! :)
1
Reply
Flag
@dazednconfuuzed: Demon in the Freezer...added to the list! Thank you too!!

honestly, I'm really surprised a small mention of a passing reference to little 'ol marburg virus would create a tangent of a cool-ass reading list! Who knew?...but it rocks! =D
1
Flag
Lol when they mentioned Marburg I thought of you.. I knew u'd be happy. The Cobra Event is Richard Preston's stab at fiction, a what-if scenerio...its pretty gruesome. He also did Demon in the freezer, which is non-fic about smallpox. Not quite as nasty as marburg or ebola but pretty effing bad...esp black pox, yikes...
1
Flag
@ Bonobo: Will do...Thanks, Cousin! :)
1
Flag
Check out The Coming Plague by Laurie Garrett. It's a non fiction book and will scare you more than any fiction book ever could!
1
Flag
Well, I thought this show would be something like the Canadian ReGenesis, but it seems it is just a new The Thing. It was a fine pilot, and I am going to join the community and see how this goes.
1
Reply
Flag
I was pretty disappointed by this premiere 'cause I've been waiting for this show for so long and the trailer and posters were so good! I thought those first twists were kinda predictable (the love triangle, the selecting evolution virus plot, the fact that the guy who played Takeida in Revenge was a bad guy...), and so boring. The tension was never really there and I don't really care what happens to the ex-wife actually BUT the infected brother is kinda creepy and I'd like to check out the rest just in case. I just hope they won't make it about aliens...
1
Reply
Flag
I found it very interesting and I am looking forward to the rest of the season.
4
Reply
Flag
Good to see there are others who liked it as well !
2
Reply
Flag
Really loved the pilot, cannot wait to see the next episode.
3
Reply
Flag
Good to see there are others who liked it as well !
2
Reply
Flag
Why shouldnt one like it?
people should stop comparing it to BSG
BSG comes once in a lifetime.
Reply
Flag
I am just saying that because if you read the comments below, there are lots of negative comments. Therefore it is good that there are others like yourself who enjoyed it like I do.
1
Reply
Flag
I do not really understand why people says its slow. Both me and my wife (which is harder to please when it comes to TV shows) watch both episodes and found it so enjoyable and exciting that we watch the 3rd episode as well.

I agree its not the best dialogue but the acting and rest of it was above average. It is certainly not BAD. I must admit I am a BSG and Ronald D Moore fan so I might be bias but my wife does not watch BSG.

I have always liked Campbell though his last two shows got cancelled.

Perhaps I did not see much virus type of movies so I do not find this story repetitive. Still it is set in a international research facility in the Arctic. I am sure not other shows did that before. Certainly nothing on TV now is similar to this one. Its 10 times better than another cop or vampire show.

Initially I too think it would be hard to make a series out of this story. However after watching 3 episodes I find there are lots of danger and potential for different sub plots to evolve that could be very exciting.

This could become one of my favorite show. I am in !

More+
4
Reply
Flag
I agree, I enjoyed it too. But there is at least one other show that did the virus thing in the Arctic - The X Files episode "Ice" (s01e08).
2
Reply
Flag
I did not see much of the X Files so I did not know :-)
Reply
Flag
That episode was the first thing I thought of when I heard about Helix.
Reply
Flag
Too many cliches and bad acting. Too many eye rolling moments , most ridiculous one give the patient morphine because he's having pain! Ridiculous. The plot holes are gaping my curiousity is waning with each episode.
2
Reply
Flag
I agree with all the comments about the flaws with this show. My biggest issue is that it feels like a 2 hour movie being stretched into a series. It is pretty obvious that this is a bio-weapon and that the head of the facility is hiding information and shouldn't be trusted but the CDC characters are way behind in their awareness. My other issue is being confined to that research facility. It works for the 2 hour movie format but I am doubtful with a serialized series. This is why Lost used flashbacks/flashforwards as a way to expand beyond the island.
Reply
Flag
And I thought the CDCs was blown up in the Zombie Apocalypse... I actually liked the pilot and will tune in for the next episode. The cinematography is quite stunning. Since I'm not an English native speaker the dialogues didn't strike me as being very terrible - maybe I didn't get the details. The one thing that bothered me was a logical mistake they made in my opinion: the infected are very agressive (might come in handy if you want to create the perfect soldier) and have the urge to infect others (which might be usefull if you want to create a biological weapon). But both doesn't workt. As far as I can see the infected are not easy to control. So what's the point in having a perfect soldier I cannot control? Doesn't make sense.
Reply
Flag
Maybe instead of creating a soldier you want to create anarchy. Loose a few of these infected in a major city and watch it die from within. You would want to make sure you have a vaccine for your own country, tho.
Reply
Flag
Has potential but also so many flaws in the pilot. The CDC are insanely stupid, in fact you'd be hard pressed to make more of a mess of things in the time they've had at the base. Mostly awful dialogue and acting mixed with excellent sfx. I took it that the monkey's fancied their chances outside better than with their infected pals but hopefully there will be more extant maccaques.
Hopefully the pilot just over did it and we'll be able to forgive the faults in future episodes, alternatively it could follow Revolution and Under The Dome to obscurity.
2
Reply
Flag
It seems to me that everything infected wants to get out so it can infect more people. The monkeys, the mouse infected with the "B" virus, and even the infected people all want "out".
1
Reply
Flag
I saw the frozen monkeys the same way. They were attempting to spread infection. What I'm really curious about is whether they will go cross-species. If so, then they had no need to escape with so many in the facility already.
Reply
Flag
The fact they did not realize why Peter cut off the arm, instantly killed the show for me. Plus non of these CDC people seem at all concerned by their own security and behave stupidly.
11
Reply
Flag
Wasn't bad, but i don't like the "style" of Sy-Fy series ...

This made me curious, but didn't hype me up. Let's see what it will bring in the next episodes.
Reply
Flag
I absolutely love this show already, but that's not to say I don't have my beef. The acting ranges from 'meh' to 'pretty good'; the believability is up there with some of the best scifi's I've seen in recent years but some events seem more at home in a 90's panic action movie than in this dark-slightly-realistic-zombie SyFy show.

This so-called perfect super-virus-mutation and a heal-all-vaccine (75% mortality though) could be the premise for an awesome worldwide zombie-virus outbreak - but I'm already doubting that will happen.

The CDC team are convincing enough in that they're legitimately trying to find a cure for the mysterious superhuman virus, buuuut their efforts are thwarted by the evil mastermind Dr. Hatake and his wildly incompetent orphan sidekick. Things go crazy fast and they blow up a satellite...wtf?
2
Reply
Flag
Great review, Tim!
Dialogue: Needs better writing - or less dialogue (hard to do on TV). Less dialogue would mean more music and weird sound effects liek the Forbidden Planet sound track.
Plot: there's nothing there for many more episodes unless they find out that the facility is run by the Koch brothers, or that it's part of a Jimmy Kimmel Youtube video. Or Keira and some of the crew from Continuum suddenly show up in a bizarre crossover. Better still, Isabelle and Kyle from The 4400!
Lame: The only time I found myself yelling at the screen (my wife hates this) is when people were going into obvious dark scary places alone.
Romance: As for the young woman and Billy, sure it's possible, and one of the few good moments of dialogue was with the ex-wife saying "Yeah, that's what I used to say, too" or whatever that line was.
Agreed: Love the facility and camera. Like the villains and the mysterious satellite transmissions. Boy that dude Hatake has the most impressive office I've ever seen.
1
Reply
Flag
That was so boring!
3
Reply
Flag
After watching episode 3 I feel this show could be a perfect successor to The Following and Under The Dome
Reply
Flag
Ok, this show is really bad, full of clichés we've seen 1000 times in many other ways.
Where is the creativity? writers gave us tremendously boring and stupid characters. (eg: a bathing female doctor alone, without caring that the entire base is in quarantine with the apocalyptic infection??? really???),

I'm tired of the writers insult the public with such low quality scripts.
I can tolerate lousy special effects, but I can NOT stand for stupid histories, where expert characters do rookie and absurd things...
5
Reply
Flag
I have to agree with on this. I had an open mind but after watching the first part I was there wondering why I should watch the second part.
I knew who was in trouble and who was hiding something now sometimes that does not stop me but in this case it really got on my nerves.
Will I watch it again the answer is "NO".

1
Reply
Flag
Being Human's a remake, not an original product. Otherwise, fantastic review.
1
Reply
Flag
Yeah he doesn't do the research and his fans expect me to.
Reply
Flag
I don't expect anything from you.
1
Reply
Flag
This is not a scifi drama - it is a lame horror series with all the usual aggravating plot devices used by unimaginative writers to scare adolescents into each others' arms.

I watched it cause I like good scifi, I.E. a story based on human interaction with speculative technology.
To be any way meaningful that human interaction has to be realistic - people need to behave in the way humans normally do & in that way we learn about how some new way of doing things effects us.

This show relies on humans behaving abnormally e.g. telegraphing their plans to others who they already suspect of being untrustworthy, not because the dis-closer is stupid or overly credulous; often it is plain they don't trust the person in whom they are confiding, but the writers are too unimaginative to advance the story or create that feeling of impending danger any other way.

Just like really lame vampire garbage where someone who knows better invites a stranger into their home or leaves the garlic & crucifix et al on the dresser before going off to confront a monster this movie goes for the cheap tricks every time.

I've got better things to do with my time than allow a bad piece of drama to manipulate me so superficially - no more of this shite pour moi.
More+
14
Reply
Flag
Saw an ad for this. Googled to see what it was about. Looked moderately interesting. Then I saw it was Ronald D Moore.

Lost interest.

He's a masterful storyteller and I thoroughly enjoyed the first two series of BSG. I applaud his pushing the envelope with the terrorism storylines. But it turned a bit odd in series 3 and series 4 was just plain bizarre with an ending that was equally horrifying and laughable.

Do I want to join Ron on another 4 year subversive religious mindjob? No thank you.
Reply
Flag
smart people doing dumb things.
dumb people doing smart things.
What's the correct formula?
If people act accordingly so everything pans out, that's a smart move...now what?
If people act correctly and then everything goes to hell...then fuck them! That was stupid.
If the CDC somehow avoids all protocols (w/e those may be) and acts irrationally and makes poor human decisions amid an unknown, alien-like and hostile outbreak...that's silly b/c deadly, unknown viral mutagens with signs and symptoms equal to that of zombies should be covered in the basic cdc-level 1101 biochem course.
2
Reply
Flag
i watched the first 3 eps this morning. really like it. damn theme song has been stuck in my head for 10 hrs now. ha
3
Reply
Flag
"I'm not sure if it's explained why the facility is all the way up there other than the fact that no one bothers them because braving sub-zero temperatures isn't worth making sure rules are followed" <- The explanation seems to be that if a nasty virus is developed up there, the outbreak will be limited to only those in the station and can't spread to the general population. Also, yes, to ensure that their "unregulated" projects remained that way.

Because a symptom of the virus is a need to spread it to others, I assume the monkeys were infected and escaped the facility in an effort to spread it. But they were frozen in the subzero atmosphere.
3
Reply
Flag
Being in the "International" section of the arctic no one country has jusrisdiction. This is helpful as you can 1) ignore human ethics laws and 2) avoid taxes while 3) maintaining a public image of concern (the researches wouldn't want to endanger anyone in a city). I thought this was pretty well defined in the first episode, or maybe my brain just filled in the gaps?
5
Reply
Flag
Here's what I don't get - The base is supposedly (a) in the arctic and (b) above the 85th parallel where no one country controls, thus no pesky regulations. This doesn't really make sense because there's virtually no land above the 85th parallel and I believe that is it claimed by one country or another and the arctic ocean is melting each summer these days meaning they couldn't have a stable base on the ice. Why didn't they set it in the antarctic, which would have made a whole lot more sense since it is (a) a stable land mass and (b) under international jurisdiction? Nothing had to change in the show except a few syllables of dialogue! I went the first half of the show thinking I made misheard the actors when they said arctic because it just makes no sense! Right?
Reply
Flag
Also, it bored me silly.
7
Reply
Flag
Friday night, 9pm, filler before drinking time it'll suffice.
Reply
Flag
I liked it. I didn't love it, but I liked it enough. I haven't seen the 3rd episode that's available on demand yet so I'll have to hold off on more opinions until than. However, as a huge fan of the genre and of Battlestar Galactica I have to force myself to think back to the first two hours of BSG. I didn't care for it, but I kept watching and as it turns out my it's my all-time favorite show. I'm giving Helix the 4 episode try it deserves IMO.
3
Reply
Flag
I'm just waiting for the revelation that the Umbrella Corp is behind the research center.
12
Reply
Flag
Did you watch BSG? One of the main characters turned out to be Jesus.

If you're in the market for revelations in this show think holier.
Reply
Flag
It was OK. I need to watch the (thi/3)rd episode soon.
1
Reply
Flag
http://www.syfy.com/now/show/Helix#show/Helix/109344323602/1/274 - Episode 3 has episode 3 up already?
Reply
Flag
Boring...pass...only good thing is Hiroyuki Sanada,but sadly not enough to keep me watching this show.
5
Reply
Flag
I thought it was okay so I'll keep watching now. I don't have anything to add to all the terrific comments below.
2
Reply
Flag
Helix jogged memories of so many other contagion/outbreak shows and particularly an episode of Stargate SG1 (Season 6 episode 4 "Frozen"), I just had to break out my collection and watch it. A much better ride in one episode than Helix will be over an entire season. I'd have appreciated Helix as a made for TV movie or mini-series, but anticipating supposedly smart professionals behaving like idiots episode after episode to create contrived hazards and stretch out the story is a deal breaker for me.
6
Reply
Flag
I think I totally agree, it's a damn waste, how is it possible that "experts" are so stupid in making decisions, no one seems worried, even with more than 3 infected have time to go to bathe alone ... BS
1
Reply
Flag
It’s not possible at all. Intelligent professional people would not behave in such a manner. And it’s only one of the many flaws with this show. The writers have opted for standard stereotypical TV fare rather than crafting an intricate, thought provoking, edge-of-your-seat story around compelling believable characters. As a fan of Science Fiction I found the writing disappointing and insulting to my intelligence.
1
Reply
Flag
Didn't like it at all.
2
Reply
Flag
I too sadly think this is a series, like so many with potential, that will only last a season or two. I did however like it, but there where two things that I got hung up on. First, how the h¤#l didn't anyone figure out why someone would want the hand of a security guard and then block that chip? Second, why where there no security outside known infected who really want out of their "cell" when you send in ppl to them. Really they don't need to be inside, sounds like a sound security measure. And about the kind of robotic behavior of some of the actors, well it's probably bad acting but many real live scientist in that field are kind of robotic. I should know, I know many of them.
8
Reply
Flag
This is a sci-fi thriller.
"stupidity" and illogical measures come with the territory.
character flaws and mistakes exist so the writers don't write themselves into a wall.
If everyone did everything perfectly...then there would be no outbreak to begin with and no story to tell. :)
4
Reply
Flag
Load More Comments
Follow this Show
Members
4,782