Hercules: The Legendary Journeys

Season 6 Episode 3

Rebel With a Cause

0
Aired Monday 5:00 PM Oct 11, 1999 on USA
7.9
out of 10
User Rating
24 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
Rebel With a Cause
AIRED:
Hercules was not happy to find that Creon had taken the throne of Thebes from Oedipus. But Hercules had his hands full with Oedipus' daughter, Princess Antigone -- a brash drunk. As Hercules tried to restore her confidence, Creon and his defense minister plotted to destroy them both. When Antigone was captured by Creon, Hercules raced through a minefield to save her from being executed. Assisted by a group of rebels, Hercules drove off Creon, who fled -- only to be blown up by his own bomb. Reunited with Oedipus, Antigone took her rightful position as Queen of Thebes.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Hercules is asked by Oedipus to protect his brash daughter, Princess Antigone, and battle the evil King Creon so that Antigone may take her rightful place as Queen of Thebes. An over-wordy and not very interesting episode...moreless

    6.1
    This will be one of my shorter episode reviews, as I didn't really find this one very interesting at all.



    Hercules arrives in Thebes just in time to stop his old friend Oedipus from taking his own life by jumping off a building. I won't try and explain how in writing, but the way Hercules saves Oedipus is really silly and far-fetched, and doesn't work in what is intended to be one of the more serious episodes.



    Oedipus asks Herc to protect his wayward daughter, the brash and often drunk Antigone. Although well played by Paige Moss, cue lots of bratish behaviour from the girl, that culminates in a 'Rebel Without a Cause' (the obvious influence of the title) style chariot race towards the edge of a cliff. I'm sorry to say that, by this stage, I wasn't really bothered whether she escaped or not.



    The rest of the story is pretty standard (with only Hercules crossing the primitive minefield as a vague highlight), as Antigone wakes up to her responsibilities, and helps Hercules oust the crooked King Creon so that she might take her rightful place as Queen.



    The episode doesn't really pack any surprises, and I found quite a drag to watch for the most part. It is very wordy in places, and what action scenes there are don't really pack a punch (no pun intended).

    Not one of my favourites, and this season has yet to offer up an episode that I truly like.moreless

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (3)

  • QUOTES (8)

    • Hercules: I know- you suffered more loss than most people can imagine, Antigone. But I also know you've got more opportunity than most people can dream of.
      Antigone: What? The opportunity to star in my own personal Greek tragedy?!

    • Creon: Tell me, do you know why your father summoned Hercules?
      Antigone: (laughing) Hercules? I didn't know he had, but I hope it's not because he thinks I need a boyfriend.

    • Antigone: I wish you could stay for a while, Hercules. To be honest, I'm a little nervous about doing this alone.
      Hercules: (Looks at all the people willing to fight and serve for her) You won't be alone, Antigone. Not anymore.

    • Antigone: What else can I do? Nobody escapes their fate!
      Hercules: So I keep hearing. But I still don't believe it. And in your heart, neither do you. If you really wanted to end your life, there are easier ways to do it.
      Antigone: But none as fun.

    • Hercules: Congratulations! You almost killed yourself!
      Antigone: That was kind of the point.

    • Jocasta: (Quietly to Oedipus) Even taking your own sight can't prevent you from seeing the vision of your past. The prophecy was true, husband. No matter how you try, you will never escape fate.

    • Creon: Young Antigone! Why am I not surprised to find you in trouble again?
      Antigone: Is that a multiple choice question?

    • Creon: You are a member of the royal family, and as such, you should be setting an example for your people.
      Antigone: You mean, other than being a royal pain in the ass?

  • NOTES (1)

  • ALLUSIONS (2)

    • The title is an allusion to the James Dean movie Rebel Without a Cause.

    • Greek Mythology: The Story of Oedipus


      The tragedy of Oedipus was almost certainly a story of oral tradition before being written down. It was a growing and changing legend that merged several stories from several sources. The most well-known version is the trilogy written by Sophocles during the 5th century BCE: Oedipus Rex, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone.


      Thebes was ruled by Laius and Jocasta, whose baby was prophesied to kill his father and marry his mother. The baby was left for dead, but survived. Later in life, Oedipus crossed paths with Laius and a fight ensued where Oedipus killed Laius. He then went on to Thebes and solved the riddle of the Sphinx to become king, marrying Jocasta in the process, and having four children, Eteocles, Polynices, Ismene, and Antigone. When the truth was discovered, Jocasta killed herself and Oedipus blinded himself. He was exiled and the throne was left to Eteocles and Polynices to share. Antigone followed her father in exile, and the two briefly settled in Colonus. Ismene arrived, bringing the news that the brothers were fighting for power, and that Creon was involved as well. Oedipus cursed his sons, while blessing his two devoted daughters, before dying. The daughters returned to Thebes to find that their brothers had killed each other, and Creon was now king. He decreed that Polynices' body would not be buried, but Antigone attempted to do so anyway. She was caught, and Creon ruled that she would be buried alive, despite her betrothal to Creon's son, Haemon. The gods expressed disapproval of Creon's decision, and he was forced to rescind it and bury Polynices. However, Antigone had already hanged herself to avoid being buried alive. Haemon attacked Creon and then killed himself. Creon's wife, Eurydice, upon hearing the news of her son, also killed herself. Creon, a broken man, remained king. The final moral given is that gods punish the proud, but punishment brings wisdom.

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