Hill Street Blues

Season 3 Episode 1

Trial by Fury

0
Aired Thursday 10:00 PM Sep 30, 1982 on NBC
9.6
out of 10
User Rating
22 votes
0

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
Furillo throws away the rule book when two young men rape and murder a nun during a church robbery; Belker befriends gay prostitute Eddie Gregg; Calletano faces a tax audit; and Joyce feels helpless as public opinion works to destroy her client.

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Friday
No results found.
Saturday
No results found.
Sunday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
    Taurean Blacque

    Taurean Blacque

    Det. Neal Washington

    Jeffrey Tambor

    Jeffrey Tambor

    Attorney/Judge Alan Wachtel (recurring)

    Michael Warren

    Michael Warren

    Officer Bobby Hill

    Charles Haid

    Charles Haid

    Andy Renko

    Michael Conrad

    Michael Conrad

    Sgt. Phil Esterhaus (1981-1984)

    Ed Marinaro

    Ed Marinaro

    Officer Joe Coffey (1981-1986)

    Silvana Gallardo

    Silvana Gallardo

    Mrs. Rodriguez

    Guest Star

    Alex Colon

    Alex Colon

    Unknown

    Guest Star

    Allan Rich

    Allan Rich

    Judge Maurice Schilling

    Guest Star

    Charles Levin

    Charles Levin

    Eddie Gregg

    Recurring Role

    Juney Smith

    Juney Smith

    Celestine Grey

    Recurring Role

    Charlene Jones

    Charlene Jones

    Hooker

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (5)


      • Sister Agnes: I saw the things they did to her body. It will be a hard memory to live with, but I know Sister Anna has already forgiven them.
        Furillo: I wish I could.

      • Eddie: I thought about what you said about degrading myself. No more bus station men's room for Eddie Gregg.
        Belker: Atta boy.
        Eddie: I'm going to work the men's room at the Hotel Excelsior!

      • Bernstein: Are you kidding? Frank, there's a lynch mob out there.
        Furillo: I know there's a lynch mob out there. I think I can use it.

      • Joyce: There's nothing worse than a gloating Italian.

      • Eddie: My grandmother was senile. She had so much fun on her birthday. She'd open her present, and drift off, then look back down and see her present, and then she'd be happy all over again.
        Mick: That's what my father does with his breakfast cereal.

    • NOTES (3)

    • ALLUSIONS (3)

      • Belker: Last name first.
        Eddie: Dubois.
        Belker: (looks at him funny but types it) First name?
        Eddie: Blanche.

        Allusion: Blanche DuBois was a woman in Tennessee William's famous play "A Streetcar Named Desire."

      • Renko: "I've got to take my morning sit-down"
        After Renko's bowels are put on hold for a marital dispute, he's forced to go to a bathroom where a man's head is wedged next to a toilet. Two months earlier, the broadcast code governing television expression had been effectively declared unconstitutional. One of the prohibitions of the code was against showing toilet bowls. This, combined with Renko's subsequent smashing of the bowl, is a great reference to the artistic and expressive ground that the show was breaking, as well as a slap to the censorship television was and still is being liberated from.

      • Esterhaus: "Your recourse to obscenity will be fresh and vital"
        During roll call, a memo from chief daniels is mentioned that recounts how officers are swearing too much in front of citizens. Alternatives to those words are written on the blackboard, including "gosh," "fudge," "dang" and several others. Ralph Daniels was the head censor at NBC at the time, and this is a dig at the constant battles that Bochco and Kozoll constantly had with NBC censors. Still, they slipped a "slut" and a "bastard" into this, and through the alternatives made all the viewers think of George Carlin's seven words.

    More
    Less
    • 9:00 pm
      Dateline NBC
      NEW
      NBC
    • 10:00 pm
      20/20
      NEW
      ABC