Homicide: Life on the Street

Season 6 Episode 23

Fallen Heroes (2)

1
Aired Friday 10:00 PM May 08, 1998 on NBC
9.7
out of 10
User Rating
32 votes
4

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Fallen Heroes (2)
AIRED:
The search for Georgia Rae and the war against her organization begin. Stivers, uncomfortable with the whole situation tells Gee about the Luther Mahoney shooting. Ballard and Gharty begin to deal with their recovery. A lead on Georgia Rae's whereabouts is uncovered. During the assault on the building, Georgia Rae's body is found and Bayliss takes a bullet that would have hit Pembleton. Gee asks Pembleton to get to heart of the Luther Mahoney shooting that started it all. Pembleton and Falsone start with Lewis and then they move onto Kellerman. The truth about the shooting comes out and Kellerman claims sole responsibility, Pembleton asks him for his badge. To protect Stivers and Lewis from prosecution, Kellerman resigns. Feeling remorse for the hesitation that caused Bayliss to take a bullet for him and with Gee's plans to cover-up the truth about the Luther Mahoney shooting, Pembleton decides it is time to resign.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A perfect climax to the series.

    10
    The thing that makes this episode so compelling and satisfying to watch is the very real and logical way in which the writers (and actors of course) play out the Mahoney shooting saga to such a believable and, in some ways, just conclusion to all that previously transpired. The frustration of Kellerman and the rest of the crew over their inability to nail Luther, the righteous indignation felt by Kellerman, Lewis and Stivers find their vent in the bullet fired from Kellerman's gun that pierces Mahoney's heart. The ensuing guilt and second guessing by Lewis and Stivers over having taken vengeance into their own hands, a very real emotion from anyone given to a true sense of justice and the belief that such matters are not for them to meet out. And then the all out war sparked by Junior Bump's squad room massacre drives the story and all of its characters to the only really believable place it can go. This shows how well equipped the cast and crew are to delve into the depths of the human condition and come out with something that inspires the viewer to think, reflect, empathize and feel. It made the entire series worth watching.moreless
  • The two-part season six finale ties up the Luther Mahoney/ Georgia Rae Mahoney storylines with a shoot-out in the squadroom, an all out war against the Mahoney organization and the departure of one of Homicide's greatest detectives.moreless

    10
    I have a list of my favorite Homicide episodes and in my humble opinion, the series could have ended with the two-part season six finale and I would have been perfectly happy. This episode tied together the storylines of Luther and Georgia Rae Mahoney. Michael Kellerman finally answered for his questionable shooting of Luther, a fact that Falsone was suspicious about since the first episode of Season 6. Andre Baugher, a truly exceptional actor, puts down the bad guy and at his wounded parter's bedside turns in his badge to Gee. This episode is a perfect example of why Homicide: Life on the Street was and still is one of my favorite shows on television.moreless
  • The best episode.

    10
    I love this series and I'm in the process of watching all of them; I love it that much.



    This was the best episode -- at least equal to the one where Kellerman shoots Luther Mahoney. An observation: Kellerman was "railroaded" for shooting Mahoney (sometimes the end does justify the means). I think because he never was able to shed his own and others' perceptions of him and his part or non-part in the previous arson for money investigation. He was so angry that he almost protested too much. So, unable to shed that stain he was certain to be misjudged for shooting Mahoney. But Mahoney had Lewis' gun and Kellerman orders Mahoney, several times, to put the gun down. Instead, Mahoney lowers the gun. Anyone knows that Mahoney would still be a threat and failure to follow an officer's directive can get you killed. Put the gun down means place the gun and out of your reach. It does NOT mean lower it where it and you are still a threat and the gun can still be used in a moment -- raised again to shoot an officer.



    Kellerman's shooting of Mahoney was entirely justified -- I have no doubt. Only "Gee" actually picks up on that at the end when he has Kellerman in the "box" (earlier Pembleton realizes it but goes no where with it) - the possibility that Kellerman could convince a jury it was justifiable -- but that Kellerman would take Stiers and Lewis with him. And the man that he is, he resigns rather than implicate his partners in what really was a justifiable shooting.



    And there wasn't a character I didn't like. I loved Lewis' character -- he was most real to me -- but he got a "walk" on whatever his part was that brought on the drug war that led up to this 2 part episode -- rightly so but that's what makes Kellerman's resignation so unfair. Lewis wasn't completely innocent either and no more or less culpable than Kellerman, both because of his actions in starting the drug war that killed the Mahoney crew and his beating of Luther before Luther gets Lewis' gun which makes Kellerman shoot Mahoney. And Falsone helped Lewis get the police information that Lewis used to spark the drug war, so Falsone's "holier than thou" attitude didn't ring true with me.



    Luther Mahoney and Georgia Ray got what they needed and deserved -- and it was the greatest good for the greatest number. Kellerman did right. Forcing him off the force was wrong.moreless
  • The continuation of one of the series greatest episodes, the conclusion of the series greatest saga...

    10
    After having survived Fallen Heroes (1), can there be satisfaction? Can the good guys win? What a silly question. There is no such thing as a win, when murder is involved.



    For an American people so drawn to happy endings, this show was not for them... and this episode in particular was definitely not for them.



    Instead of giving us a win, with a criminal going to jail. They give us a loss (Georgia Rae not being apprehended.) Then they give us another loss( Baylis being shot.) They follow that with a third loss (Kellerman going down.) And finally, a fourth loss (Pembleton stepping down.)



    Then, they send you off for the summer hiatus (if you watched when the show actually ran.)



    Murder is dirty business, but it\'s also the search for truth. In this case it\'s a truth we\'ve known for a season so, for us the truth isn\'t even that important. It\'s how they find the truth that makes it compelling drama and superb television. In the end, I guess we do win.moreless
Andre Braugher

Andre Braugher

Det. Frank Pembleton (seasons 1-6, TVM)

Kyle Secor

Kyle Secor

Tim Bayliss

Richard Belzer

Richard Belzer

Det. John Munch

Reed Diamond

Reed Diamond

Det. Mike Kellerman (seasons 4-6)

Peter Gerety

Peter Gerety

Stu Gharty (Seasons 6-7, recurring previously, TVM)

Clark Johnson

Clark Johnson

Det. Meldrick Lewis

Dave Trovato

Dave Trovato

Officer Graul

Guest Star

Anthony Agnew

Anthony Agnew

Driver

Guest Star

Jacqui Allen

Jacqui Allen

Susan Tobler

Guest Star

Toni Lewis

Toni Lewis

Terri Stivers

Recurring Role

Clayton LeBouef

Clayton LeBouef

Col. Barnfather

Recurring Role

Jon Orofino

Jon Orofino

Officer Hoskins

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

    • The doughnut that Kellerman is eating disappears when he is talking to Pembleton & Falsone about the Mahoney shooting, then reappears when Falsone hands him the clip-board to write his confession on.

  • QUOTES (4)

    • Lt. Giardello: Frank.
      Pembleton: I'm done.
      Lt. Giardello: What?
      Pembleton: Bayliss is hit because of what? A partner who can't get him through safely to the end of the shift.
      Lt. Giardello: Look, this is not your fault.
      Pembleton: Yeah, it's mine and I'll carry it. I gotta carry it. Bayliss is in there because of me, and you and Lewis, Kellerman and Stivers. All of it. But what is it? What is it really?
      Lt. Giardello: Frank.
      Pembleton: It's a lie, a damn lie. Now maybe you can live with this lie but me I just walked into the box with a man I served with, a fellow detective, Kellerman. I watched him turn the dirt. You told me to do it, I did it. Now you want me to look away. Live this lie. If I'd listened to you, if I'd just listened I never would have come back to this job. And Tim, Tim's not laying in that bed with all those damn tubes sticking out of him. I know that smell, it smells like death. I couldn't listen to that. There's no truth for me anymore, not anymore. I can't be out on the street. I'm never going back in that box ever again. It's done. I'm finished. Thank you.

    • Pembleton: Dear God, make Bayliss fight. God, please, I swear I will do anything. Let him live. I'm askin'. I'm beggin'. Help my friend, I want him to live.

    • Virginia Bayliss: He thinks the world of you. He says that you're his friend. He says you're not a person who has friends but that he's your friend.

    • Bayliss: You know something I didn't see it, I didn't see it coming, didn't see him. And he's coming in there playin' all hard. But we get a lot of guys that come in there doin' that same thing, you know.
      Pembleton: You think we were supposed to know he was the one? That this punk, out of all the other punks that come through the squad room, this one's going over the top? Please.
      Bayliss: While I'm runnin' round to my gun locker and I'm trying to get my back up gun because my gun is in my desk. It's in the bottom left draw. He's blowin' up the place, and my guns sittin' down there, it's sittin' with the pencils, with the paper clips.
      Pembleton: Nobody was ready.
      Bayliss: Well I'm ready now.
      Pembleton: Ready for what?
      Bayliss: Anything Frank. Anywhere.

  • NOTES (5)

    • Andre Braugher and Reed Diamond leave the series after this episode. Diamond would return for a 2 parter in season 7, and the TV Movie, Braugher would return for the TV Movie.

    • One of the commercials shown during the broadcast of this episode advertised that some episodes from the series were made available for commercial purchase. They may have been testing the waters, because it has been reported to me that they've only released one boxed set containing three tapes each containing one episode. The episodes featured are contained #1 "Gone for Goode", #22 "Every Mother's Son", and #39 "A Doll's Eyes". You might check the NBC web site to see if anything else was made available.

    • When this episode was rerun on 18 Sep 1998, with both parts shown back to back, some of the scenes were longer and some additional scenes were added; such as a meeting between Billie "Mr. Gharty's bartender" and Mrs. Gharty.

    • The following warning preceded this episode: "This episode has a level of violence unusual for the series. Parental discretion is advised."

    • Music in this episode: John Hiatt "Native Son" alb: Walk On; The Impressions "It's All Right" alb: The Best of Jukebox Rock, 1963.

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