Homicide: Life on the Street

Season 3 Episode 18

Nothing Personal

0
Aired Friday 10:00 PM Apr 21, 1995 on NBC
8.9
out of 10
User Rating
33 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Nothing Personal
AIRED:
Crosetti's caseload is distributed among the detectives and Howard's 100% clearance rate may be in jeopardy when she gets his most difficult unsolved case; this is further complicated when Beau misplaces some new evidence. Gee meets one of Megan's friends at lunch and is convinced she isn't interested in him because he is too black. The guys close on the bar but wind up penniless when they must pay extra fees that they weren't aware of. Beau looks to Megan for comfort when he can't recover the evidence and it looks as though Beth and kids are never coming back.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Gee distributes Crosetti's open cases amongst his crew. Howard who has a perfect clearance record is faced with the daunting task of Crosetti's most dificult case. Gee has lady troubles, while Felton's start to take a toll on his performance at work.moreless

    8.0
    "Nothing Personal" is one of the weaker episodes in this series, and like a few other episodes before it, should have been aired in a different order. After the trio of detectives bar already has its grand opening, this episode takes the viewer back to even more obstacles in their way. When i see the bars progression hindered yet again, i think to myself, not this same old song again.



    One new thing that this episode incorporates is Gee's anger, although always hard-nosed we never see Gee lash out or take his personal problems to work. In this episode we see Gee throw a chair in the squad room after Russert's friend shows no interest in pursuing a relationship with him . Bolander plays the role of a "peace keeper" and shares a meal and conversation with the rejected Gee.moreless
  • A filler episode but it has some interesting points.

    8.1
    Of all the programs scheduling changes, the most confusing was shifting ‘Nothing Personal’ from ninth in scheduling to eighteenth. This would lead to one of the biggest lapses in continuity considering that it was set before the major events that would occur in season 3 (the shooting of the detectives; the promotion of Russert to Captain; the opening of The Waterfront) In no publication or internet site have I ever seen a reason why. Perhaps the NBC executives didn’t think that it was sensational or exciting enough. It is comparatively low-key But there are some segments which make it arresting.



    Set six weeks after Crosetti’s suicide, Giardello has finally managed to get around to distributing all of his open cases. Gee seems down at this, and can not even watch Crosetti’s name being erased from the board. Lewis is more than a little depressed by this (he asked Gee to take all of the workload on himself) But the one who feels the most pain is Kay Howard. Her clearance rate, which up until now has been 100% is challenged by the murder of Erica Chilton, a six month old investigation with no real leads and no suspects. She then spends most of the episode determined to solve this case. It is unclear whether Howard wants to solve this case because she needs to solve every case or whether she feels threatened about being the only female detective on the squad. But her reasons appear irrelevant as she has no real hope of solving the case.



    Adding to her disturbed state of mind is Felton’s deteriorated state. Though he seems OK in the teaser, the other detectives all correctly note that the detective is falling apart. When an attempt at reconciliation with his wife fails, he continues his descent into drink. However, for the first time, it causes him to fail on the job when he misplaces letters that may have been sent from the killer. (As it will turn out, this evidence would have no relation to catching the murderer) He eventually hits rock bottom by ending up at Russerts house looking not for sex but for compassion. Things will improve from here on, but only in a relative sense.



    The detectives aren’t the only ones who are dealing with bad news. Gee is understandably upset when he has to distribute Crosettis case, but he seems to improve when he goes to lunch with one of Megan Russert’s friends. They have a certain simpatico but she decides not to pursue a relationship with him. Now we never get a clear reason as to why she rejects him but Gee concludes that it because this woman (also black, but with light skin) doesn’t want to be seen with a dark- skinned man. This clearly has happened to Gee in the past but for some reason he takes this as a huge affront, and becomes infuriated.



    None of the detectives have the nerve to approach him but Bolander, the only man on the squad who can relate with Gee’ problems manages to get him to confide in him. Gee is more upset than we realized. As he puts it to Bolander, “I hate myself. I don’t have any friends to speak of. All I have is this job and it disgusts me.” He believes that this kind of life is what made Crosetti kill himself. This is a very deep level of pain and though this issue isn’t dealt with directly for the rest of the season, it doesn’t go away. He will feel versions of this pain when it comes to dealing with his children and his career. It’s never going to ease.



    This episode also demonstrates, indirectly, the value of Stanley Bolander to the squad. None of the other detectives have the concern or the nerve to talk to Gee like a man rather than as a shift commander. Furthermore, he manages to give Howard advice in getting over the Chilton case. “A good detective may not know when to give up. But a good detective knows when its time to move on.” This gentle push helps Howard get the nerve to leave the case alone--- for now.



    This episode is so focused that for once some of the comedy about The Waterfront seems a little out of place. In the grimness of the episode, we almost overlook the fact that the purchase of the bar has finally come through. Though the sequence at the bank is amusing, the rest of the business about their problems not being quite over seems a little added on.



    ‘Nothing Personal’ isn’t a great episode but it does stand out to show how well Fontana and associates had managed to write well for all the characters and not just Pembleton as some have considered.. Yaphet Kotto does some great work, as do Melissa Leo and Daniel Baldwin. This is a tale of raw nerves but it also shows how people deal with their own problems.

    My score:8

    moreless
Andre Braugher

Andre Braugher

Det. Frank Pembleton (seasons 1-6, TVM)

Kyle Secor

Kyle Secor

Tim Bayliss

Richard Belzer

Richard Belzer

Det. John Munch

Ned Beatty

Ned Beatty

Stan Bolander (Seasons 1-3)

Daniel Baldwin

Daniel Baldwin

Beau Felton (Seasons 1-3, recurring subsequently, TVM)

Isabella Hofmann

Isabella Hofmann

Megan Russert (Seasons 3-4, recurring otherwise)

Dean Winters

Dean Winters

Tom Marans

Guest Star

Pamela Isaacs

Pamela Isaacs

Amanda DeBreaux

Guest Star

Stan King

Stan King

Bobby

Guest Star

Walt MacPherson

Walt MacPherson

Roger Gaffney

Recurring Role

Sharon Ziman

Sharon Ziman

Naomi

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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