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FOX (ended 2010)

Orange You Sad I Did Say Banana

  • Avatar of DocBlaze

    DocBlaze

    [1]Sep 5, 2008
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    Has anybody ever received the same kind of criticism that Kahn received in this episode? I totally identified with him in this episode. It was a funny one, especially when he tried his hardest, but what got me was the accusations he got from the Laotian community. With me, it's like if someone were to say that I'm not Mexican enough because I was born, raised, and grew up here in the states and while I do connect with my relatives, I have to say that I am very Americanized. It's the same thing when certain African-Americans are accused of being 'sellouts'.
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    black_mage_x

    [2]Sep 5, 2008
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    I thought that you were going to tell a knock knock joke.
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    HelloStuart

    [3]Sep 5, 2008
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    black_mage_x wrote:
    I thought that you were going to tell a knock knock joke.

    Nope, it's an episode from three years ago. In another futile attempt to join that all-Laotian country club, Kahn is accused of being a "banana" (a.k.a. an Asian Oreo) and tries to live a lifestyle akin to his ancient roots.
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    Hiei1314

    [4]Sep 6, 2008
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    Well, you see, there are two extremes to that:

    One is where the person still desperately clings to every part of their heritage.

    The other is where they dump it all out the window and let themselves get whitewashed.

    So I, being the daughter of two Latino immigrants (not Mexican, just to make that clear), have experience with that. I was born and raised here and I speak perfect English, but I don't simply forget my Salvadoran, Panamanian, and Puerto Rican roots. I speak Spanish, I eat food from my native countries, I know a lot about my culture. I'm very proud of where I come from, but I don't go to the first extreme. But like I said, I don't go around trying to act like a white valley/rich girl (like I've seen many Korean and Filipino girls do. Just stating an observation, I don't want to offend anyone), either. And I don't mean to offend any white people by "white valley/rich girl," it's just another observation. People in my or my parents' position sometimes think that being white is being "American," which, of course, is not true.

    So what people like Kahn and their children need to do is find a balance. It's actually not as hard as people think

    So I was a little mixed about the ending. It's good that Kahn kept the pool and wasn't ashamed of it, but it still felt like he was fine with losing touch with his heritage. I mean, other than still speaking Laotian, it's like he's trying to forget about it.

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  • Avatar of HelloStuart

    HelloStuart

    [5]Sep 6, 2008
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    Hiei1314 wrote:

    Well, you see, there are two extremes to that:

    One is where the person still desperately clings to every part of their heritage.

    The other is where they dump it all out the window and let themselves get whitewashed.

    So I, being the daughter of two Latino immigrants (not Mexican, just to make that clear), have experience with that. I was born and raised here and I speak perfect English, but I don't simply forget my Salvadoran, Panamanian, and Puerto Rican roots. I speak Spanish, I eat food from my native countries, I know a lot about my culture. I'm very proud of where I come from, but I don't go to the first extreme. But like I said, I don't go around trying to act like a white valley/rich girl (like I've seen many Korean and Filipino girls do. Just stating an observation, I don't want to offend anyone), either. And I don't mean to offend any white people by "white valley/rich girl," it's just another observation. People in my or my parents' position sometimes think that being white is being "American," which, of course, is not true.

    So what people like Kahn and their children need to do is find a balance. It's actually not as hard as people think

    So I was a little mixed about the ending. It's good that Kahn kept the pool and wasn't ashamed of it, but it still felt like he was fine with losing touch with his heritage. I mean, other than still speaking Laotian, it's like he's trying to forget about it.


    Exactly. The whole episode was a social satire about assimilation where everything was taken to outrageous (and often hilarious) extremes. In the course of the show's run, we've seen Kahn's family at both ends of the spectrum (the other being the episode where they "go hillbilly") in a desperate attempt to fit into their surroundings.
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  • Avatar of DocBlaze

    DocBlaze

    [6]Sep 24, 2008
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    I know exactly what you guys mean. For one thing, I may connect with relatives and such, but it's like how I look at specific people of the African American heritage being looked at as Uncle Toms, Oreos, or sellouts.
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