King of the Hill

Season 12 Episode 22

Life: A Loser's Manual

1
Aired Sunday 8:30 AM May 18, 2008 on FOX
8.5
out of 10
User Rating
38 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Hoyt, Luanne's father and Peggy's brother, shows up in Arlen, to the excitement of Luanne, who has been longing to have a normal family for the baby who is about to come. What no one (besides Peggy) knows, is that he has been in prison and not on an oil rig. Lucky, who, with the help of Hank, was trying to get all his identification and credit cards, takes the fall for Hoyt when he commits a crime, to avoid having Luanne's heart broken. Peggy decides that Hoyt's gone too far and decides to set him up. Dale decides to go and build his dream tower, and just skirt the regulations so he can't get in trouble.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Luanne's Daddy!

    7.5
    Considering that not only is this a season finale, but that KOTH has generally delivered very good ones, this is a disappointment. It was nice that they finally introduced Peggy's brother and Luanne's dad, as he has been mentioned since Episode 1. However, the humour itself was lacking. It was boring, but it wasn't all that exciting either. Dale's plot was decent, but again, it could have been funnier. I think it didn't have enough screen time to really become engaging. Overall it was a good episode, but not as good as it should have been for a finale.moreless

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (9)

    • The opening theme song does not have the changes that most other finales have had.

    • This is the only episode of the series in which Hoyt appears.

    • Tagline: "Pee-pee money is not an employment history." -Hank

    • Boomhauer does not have any lines in this episode.

    • Bill once said that Hoyt looked just like a male version of Peggy, but in this episode, Hoyt looks nothing like her.

    • Hank says he never met Hoyt, which coincides with this episode's history of when he left, but in previous episodes, it was stated Hoyt left when Luanne was an adult, and after Hank married Peggy. It seems odd he wouldn't have been at the wedding, but its possible he was in jail/prison at the time.

    • In this episode Luanne's dad claims to have not seen her since she was a little girl, however in the very first episode Luanne moved in with the Hills because her mom stabbed her dad with a fork and he fled and she was 17 or 18 at the time.

    • Dale's plan for a guard tower was shown previously in the episode "Flush with Power", during which the zoning board denied him a permit to build it. In this episode, he attempts to avoid the zoning board altogether.

    • This is the first appearance of Luanne's father. Peggy mentioned earlier in the series he has been working on an oil rig in the Pacific Ocean and wouldn't come back until someone faxed him Leanne's (Luanne's mom) death certificate.

  • QUOTES (16)

    • Hank: It's going to be hard work helping Lucky, but fun.
      Bill: Don't fix his teeth, Hank! It's the only thing I have on him!

    • Hoyt (giving Bobby a gift): Here's something for this kid of yours!
      Bobby: My name is Bobby, Uncle Hoyt.

    • Lucky: Dad, were you in the state oil rig, or the federal?
      Hoyt: Smart man! That means we're like family. Say I got ten cigarettes, and you pay me ten more for watching your back. Now how many I got?
      Lucky: Twenty.
      Hoyt: No, only 15, 'cause I gotta pay a tax to the guard.
      Lucky: Cigarette math is full of surprises.

    • Kahn: Yeah, yeah, redneck claim it legal, but there gotta be something wrong with it! Because it built by rednecks!

    • Dale (building a structure and trying to stay under zoning limits to avoid being inspected): What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up, like a raisin in the sun? Or does it rise to a height of exactly 39 feet, teaching the Zoning Board who not to mess with?
      Bill: I know the answer!
      Dale: And soon Bill, so will they.

    • Peggy: All we have to do is fix all of Lucky's problems, reform my brother and keep his prison record a secret from Luanne-- piece of cake.

    • Hoyt: Ah! My little sister! Look at you, you ain't changed a bit!
      Peggy: And look at you; letting yourself into my house without my help.

    • Peggy: (Sternly) Bobby, go to your room and alphabetize your troll dolls.
      Bobby: Okay.

    • Hank: (To Lucky) Why would you throw away everything we worked for? We were even getting you into Triple-A!

    • Luanne: My daddy and my baby's daddy will be together in one room. Now the baby will have heritage!

    • Hank: Peggy, I finally get to meet your brother. An oil man and a propane man. Two energy professionals in the same family.

    • Hank: Here under employer you put Costco. You never worked at Costco.
      Lucky: No, but Costco gave me the slip on pee-pee money for my settlement.
      Hank: Pee-pee money is not an employment history.

    • Luanne: (Crying) Normal families buy things on credit cards.

    • Luanne: Lucky, I am so proud that you confessed to stealing to protect that little crippled boy who really did it. But now what will happen to the little crippled boy?

    • Kahn: Inspector, fine this redneck for reckless redneck-itude!

    • Lucky: My dad always said a man's wallet should only hold cash, a razor blade, and a lucky poker chip.
      Hank: Lucky, is that the kind of father you want to be to your child?

  • NOTES (1)

  • ALLUSIONS (3)

    • Dale: He wept because there were no more worlds to conquer.

      This is a quotation from Plutarch, referring to Alexander the Great. It is attributed to various authors, from Milton to Aelian, though the oldest known source appears to be from Plutarch's essay "On Contentment of the Mind" It is also quoted by Hans Gruber in the movie Die Hard.

    • Dale: What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun?

      This is a quotation from Langston Hughes's "Harlem: A Dream Deferred." The theme of the poem is how having to postpone your deepest desires can lead to a downfall.

    • The title is an allusion to Georges Perec's book "Life: A User's Manual", originally published in French and titled as "La Vie mode d'emploi". The book is a collection of short stories about the residents of a fictitious Parisian apartment block.

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