King of the Hill

Season 2 Episode 9

The Company Man

0
Aired Sunday 8:30 AM Dec 07, 1997 on FOX
8.2
out of 10
User Rating
55 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Hank is told he must try and get a business man from Boston to sign up with Strickland Propane, and at first he thinks it will be easy. However, the man is unhappy because he doesn't feel Hank is a "real Texan". Hank does whatever the man wants in order to win him over, and to prevent him from going with his enemy Thatherton. Bobby has to write an essay for church about who he admires, and he picks Hank. Because of Hank's lies to Mr. Holloway (the business man), Bobby starts to get a lot of misinformation.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Stick a fork in it .

    10
    Another classic KOTH episode filled with great moments and laughs. The introduction of Strickland is in this episode, and he seems pretty normal here. What is great about this episode is that many of the characters in previous episodes (and later ones too) have these stereotypes about other people, and now this man comes in and has a stereotype about Texas. I think the sneeze guard joke is funny, and how Peggy dresses like the wait staff. It's great because people really do go above and beyond to try and get business deals and this just puts a funny spin on that concept. Another amazing one!moreless
  • 15 years of working for Strickland Propane, and things are about to change for Hank Hill. Mr. Strickland expects him to put on the glitz and flash for a very special sales situation.moreless

    8.2
    This episode shows us some background information about what really happened at Strickland Propane. Eight years ago, one of the most valuable salesmen at the store opened up his own business right nearby and shows us Hank's hidden glitch in the process; he's not really able to demand what he needs to progress in life. Hank is perpetually under-acheiving at work and in contrast to his old co-worker M.F. Thatherton, he's fair to middlin' at best; he hasn't stood up to his boss really much at all, just goes with the flow while Thatherton runs with the ball to make his own fortune. Hank shows temerity and loyalty to home and work while Thatherton shows cold-blooded, hard-nosed unethical business tactics; two very different men indeed. **SPOILERS**









    When a Boston "yankee" customer comes to town to negotiate an enormous propane contract with(hopefully)Strickland Propane, Hank has to put on a dog-and-pony show to get his attention. So as Hank goes down the slippery slope of reluctantly selling out his own self image in the interest of the company's coveted propane sale, we have to ask ourselves when will the madness end. To make things worse, Bobby is going along for the ride with the sales trip and in a bit of a subplot, he's writing down every false word his father says to woo the very demanding customer; he must recite the entire transcript at church on as part of his

    Sunday school assignment. Tune in for some funny stuff.moreless
Mike Judge

Mike Judge

Voice of Hank Hill, Boomhauer

Kathy Najimy

Kathy Najimy

Voice of Peggy Hill

Pamela Adlon

Pamela Adlon

Voice of Bobby Hill

Brittany Murphy

Brittany Murphy

Voice of Luanne Platter

Johnny Hardwick

Johnny Hardwick

Voice of Dale Gribble

Stephen Root

Stephen Root

Voice of Bill Dauterive, Buck Strickland (Uncredited)

Billy West

Billy West

Mr. Holloway

Guest Star

Stockard Channing

Stockard Channing

Mrs. Holloway

Special Guest Star

Burt Reynolds

Burt Reynolds

M.F. Thatherton

Special Guest Star

Toby Huss

Toby Huss

Voice of Kahn Souphanousinphone

Recurring Role

Ashley Gardner

Ashley Gardner

Voice of Nancy Hicks Gribble

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (6)

    • In the diner there is a man sitting at the counter. He gets up and leaves part way through. He is all of a sudden back at the counter when Thatherton is at Hank's table.

    • Camelot is indeed a stage play, and Jason Alexander has done numerous amounts of stage plays, however he has never done a Camelot as Peggy makes it seem.

    • Hank asks Peggy if she has a dress from one of Luanne's momma's weddings. It seems unlikely that Hank would refer to the wedding of Peggy's brother to "one of Luanne's momma's weddings" so he most likely is referring to another one of hers, but it seems odd that she would have gone to any wedding outside of the one to her brother, as a) she probably didn't know her before, b) she has been in jail since the incident so if she DID get married it would have been at the jail, and Peggy wouldn't have gone since the woman stabbed her brother.

    • In the scene where Hank takes Holloway to the construction site even though his head is turned you can still see Holloway's mouth and it isn't moving as he speaks.

    • Tagline: "Ha ha ha ha ha!" -Holloway

    • When Hank and Peggy take Mr. Holloway to the restaurant, their dinner plates change color from white, to green, and back to white.

  • QUOTES (4)

    • Hank: Here's your julep, Holloway. Let's talk propane.
      Holloway (slurping and then spitting): You call this a mint julep?!?! Where's the vodka? Where's the tomato juice? Maybe I ought to let Thatherton buy my drinks from now on, I.tell.you.what.
      Hank: Mister, I'll tell you what. I don't want your business. Not this way. If you want to go with Thatherton, go. But, one of these days, when your propane mixture's only 89%, and you have a smelly condo development full of crying babies whose bottles haven't been properly heated, you give me a call. My name is Hank Hill, and I sell propane and propane accessories with honor and dignity.

    • Peggy: You've got something right there on your back, honey.
      Hank: What?
      Peggy: Footprints.

    • Hank (as he has realized that he needs to feed Mr. Holloway's warped views of what Texas is like if he wants to keep his attention): You know, Holloway, I once had a pair of boots. .. and then, one day, my uncle fess lost his in a tornado.
      Holloway: Oh, you mean a twister?
      Hank: Yup. A big Texas-sized twister, I tell you what. Well, that dang twister sucked his boots plumb off. Well, you can't bury a man in his stocking feet. It's the cowboy code. So I gave him my boots, and that's the story of what happened to my boots.
      Holloway: Wow! This is great, J.R.
      Bobby: I always thought you were afraid to wear boots 'cause your toes were too fat.
      (later, at a boot store)
      Sales Clerk: I don't really recommend a cowboy boot for a chubby-toed customer like yourself. You might want to try a Birkenstock sandal.
      Hank: Shut the hell up.

    • Hank: Under your very feet, Holloway, is what's called " it's the only place in the world you can straddle the east and west pipelines. You want Texas, Mr. Holloway? This is Texas.
      Holloway: Where are the oil wells? Where are the rattlers? JR, I want to buy a six-shooter

  • NOTES (2)

    • The first look at Thatherton Fuels it looks just like Strickland only it has Thatherton's name on it. It also is called Thatherton Propane, as suppose to Fuels like he mentions it is.

    • This episode was on the Season 1 DVD because it was originally produced for Season 1. You can tell because of the way the characters look, and because of Hank and Peggy's bedroom wallpaper. It was put between "Plastic White Female", and "King of the Ant Hill", which were not in the proper order.

  • ALLUSIONS (3)

    • The poem recited by Peggy and Mrs. Holloway is indeed a real poem called "The Cow" by Ogden Nash, as they mentioned.

    • Dallas Several points of this story is reminiscent of stereotypical Texan media. Holloway calls Hank J.R. on several occasions which is the lead character of the 1980's series Dallas

    • "Jugstore Cowboys", the strip club Hank takes his prospective client to, is a allusion to the movie title Drugstore Cowboy, a 1989 Gus Van Sant film, starring Matt Dillon.

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