Law & Order: Criminal Intent

Season 3 Episode 20

D.A.W.

3
Aired Sunday 9:00 PM May 16, 2004 on USA
8.6
out of 10
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Episode Summary

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D.A.W.
AIRED:
The investigation into the death of a woman searching for the whereabouts of her late mother's antique ring leads Goren and Eames to a physician serial killer who has cleverly concealed the murder of over two hundred of his patients.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A distraught woman whose mom has just passed notices her mother's ring is missing. She is soon gruesomely run down and over by two cars in front of witnesses. Turns out she was deliberately killed, for an odd motive.moreless

    7.0
    The second driver, an inadvertent hit, is able to give info on the first driver, the premeditated murderer. Goren realizes still another car was set up to force the second one into her, and Eames intuits the drugs in her system were not self administered.



    In a relatively linear fashion, the detectives suspect that the ring's the thing, (very valuable and it's been switched) and soon believe that the motive is prepaid crematorium contracts. Under no circumstances should one change their mind to burial after signing!



    The sick perp here is one of the ilk DollBoy loves to twist into a psychic pretzel...a supercilious doc who initially doubts BG is educated enough to recognize a common synonym for arrhythmia. Ooh! Big mistake!



    But the ole doc is prolific - 248 heart diseased bodies (or doctored records saying so) laid to rest prematurely, all killed for baubles and pre-pays before their time. Bobby thinks the real motive is "because he can", ie., power over life and death beyond even the usual godhood society bestows upon those with ability to save our lives.



    For those "addicted to power" our detective reserves the inner circles of hell. "For us to get him, his loss of power must be public and complete", Goren intones. There is something delightfully medeival meshed with the fully modern in Goren. Like he wants for the 'special' perps public square drawn and quarterings featuring surroundsound confessions.



    Straightforward, if ghoulish storyline that feels done before, if elsewhere. Could be because of the ripped from the headlines derivation, or the twist on angels of death, multi-murdering MDs, and phony crematoriums in past CI episodes.



    So a chief direction in this one is Bobby watching and gosh, Goren's hot at the accident scene in a black leather jacket with his badge shining moonlight on the lapel. Hey, Tulip? :) Sexy highly inflected voice hushed at times to a whole new level of listening intensity - does he do that to make us watch his lips?



    Deliberate or not..it's working. And oooh, those divinely raised expressive eyebrows, earnest, direct gazes, quizzical boychild glances, and when he strolls the city with his partner, black overcoat pulled snug over those shoulders because both fists are straining the pockets in school boy pensive walk.....:)



    Yum!moreless
Kevin Tighe

Kevin Tighe

Dr. Edwin Lindgard

Guest Star

Karen Ziemba

Karen Ziemba

Isabel Dawson

Guest Star

Keisha Alfred

Keisha Alfred

Danielle Pearce

Guest Star

Leslie Hendrix

Leslie Hendrix

Dr. Elizabeth Rodgers

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

    • Goof: When Goren and Eames first speak to Dr. Edwin Lindgard in his office, he wears no glasses in any of the scene's shots until the last one.

  • QUOTES (1)

    • Robert Goren: You're a gun enthusiast, doctor?
      Edwin Lingard: I find target shooting very relaxing.
      Alex Eames: Really? Firing a weapon never has that effect on me.

  • NOTES (1)

  • ALLUSIONS (2)

    • The title of this episode, "D.A.W.", is the abbreviation for the medical term 'Dispense as Written'.

    • This episode appears to be ripped from the headlines of the Harold Shipman case. Dr. Harold Shipman, a British physician and pethidine addict, was convicted in the homicides of fifteen out of the over 200 elderly patients he was suspected of murdering during his thirty year medical career. Whether it is a deliberate nod to the Shipman case, at the dinner party at the end, there is a man sitting at the table who is a dead ringer for the real-life doctor.

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