Law & Order: Criminal Intent

Season 1 Episode 21

Faith

0
Aired Sunday 9:00 PM Apr 28, 2002 on USA
8.9
out of 10
User Rating
93 votes
4

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
When a wealthy publisher is murdered to prevent him from exposing an elaborate confidence game that enveloped him, his company and one of his editors, Goren and Eames run their own con to extract a confession from the killer.

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Today
4:00am
USA
5:00am
USA
6:00am
USA
1:00pm
ION
2:00pm
ION
3:00pm
ION
4:00pm
ION
5:00pm
ION
6:00pm
ION
7:00pm
ION
8:00pm
ION
9:00pm
ION
10:00pm
ION
11:00pm
ION
12:00am
ION
Sunday
3:00am
USA
4:00am
USA
5:00am
USA
Monday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A publisher is killed because a work of fiction turns out to be the author, not just the book.

    8.5
    The storyline revolves around "Erica", a teen victim of Lou Gehrig's disease.



    When a recently widowed "tough old bird" publisher is gruesomely murdered, based on the MO Goren surmises the killer may have been a woman. He deems the style of killing indicative of someone who is "neurotically anxious", and that the victim was "an object of anger but not passion".



    The clues lead to a jewelry store to a wheelchair and respirator to a book publishing company, and fianlly to the teen author and victim of ALS who is oddly mever actually seen by anyone.



    In a phone interview, Goren inquires about how recluse Erica's dexterity, "asymetric disability", and to Deakins amazement, menstruation cycle, are affected by ALS. (Sheridan is such a primo executor of bemused, slightly shocked Goren appreciation). The "child" is unable to respond with authenticity, and BG understands "Erica" is a hoax.



    So who has written the best-selling tear-jerkers? Someone who craves the importance of representing a spiritual bulwark, as well as the book sales. And who has killed the publisher, who obviously discovered the child's

    existance was a fraud?



    The psuedo 'foster parents' who have fattened up off royalties, or the chump editor so enchanted by the girl's message of hope that she'd do anything to protect it?



    Another Goren and Eames fib forces the confession(s) with a fictitious inurance payoff but no spoilers here, folks!





    Best Eames Line: I've never seen JD Salinger either, but that doesn't make me doubt his existance". LOL!!!!





    Best Bobby Goren line: "I'm open to anything".

    2nd best: "Anytime you want to jump in".



    moreless
  • When a publisher of a book written by a young girl with ALS is murdered the story starts to unravel. The book editor and the young girl's step parents seem to be wrapped up in the situation way beyond normal as a string of lies begins to unfold.moreless

    8.5
    Imagine murdering someone because you believe so strongly in something or someone only to find out it doesn't exist. Boy would that be a wake up call.



    A couple of con artists take the public, a publisher, and especially the books editor for an emotional and financial ride. I think the realization when the scientist who wrote the forward found out that he had bought a respirator and so had the publisher the look on his face said it all. That moment when something you thought was so real begins to melt away and a new reality takes over.



    The editor was so involved with the book itself and so invested personally (she wrote it herself) that she never would even consider that the young girl did not exist. Even when given factual proof. It was then that the detectives realized she was responsible for the murder. The "step parents" would turn into accessories after the fact in the end as well as figures in a large scam to bilk thousands of dollars out of numerous peoples pockets. A terrific story of people really using the system to its furthest. I loved the dialogue especially when Goren was on the phone with the girl the first time. He really busted the situation wide open. By asking something only a girl going thru it could answer he stumped the woman and got her off track from her very quick standard responses. What a scam, what a story. Thanks for reading...moreless
  • Basis premise was good, but got a little too carried away.

    7.0
    I like the idea of the child in distress writing the best-selling book, yet in the end it's all made-up. If they'd left it at that, I would have liked the episode much better.



    What I just couldn't buy was the editor's role in all of this. If she'd been in on it, too, then maybe. But I just couldn't believe she'd kill just out of her faith in this girl, especially after she'd rewritten most of the original book. She had to know it was fake, so why the strong belief?



    moreless
  • The new American dream is all about finding ways to get people to give you money without having to earn it.

    7.0
    Sometimes I think the new American dream is all about finding ways to get people to give you money without having to earn it.



    In this episode our two detectives stumble onto a confidence scheme while investigating a murderer. Though the introductory portion is confusing, it does all sort out at the end. It did seem hard to stick with at first, because the method of the crime didn't make it readily apparent exactly *who* had been murdered. Then you spend several minutes trying to figure out who those five people were at the introductory segment, because you don't see them again for quite a few minutes into the episode.



    The ending was quite moving though... it's sad how someone can deceive themselves so thouroughly that they believe murder in whatever cause is okay. An okay episode, but it could have used a dose of clarity.moreless
Mia Dillon

Mia Dillon

Barb Windemere

Guest Star

Remak Ramsay

Remak Ramsay

Douglas Lafferty

Guest Star

Matthew Sussman

Matthew Sussman

David Cantler

Guest Star

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

    • Alex Eames: Someone defragged his computer to wipe out his hard drive.

      This statement is incomplete. The idea is that the information of interest was deleted and then the disk was defragmented. A deleted file on a disk is recoverable so long as the physical space it occupied has not been written over by new data, because "deleting" a file really just tells the operating system to treat that area of the disk as available. Defragmenting the disk arranges all of the files around so that they are written in one continuous block on the disk. In the process, large portions of the data have to be moved to new locations often by way of other temporary stopping places, so there is a good chance the deleted files will be overwritten possibly several times.

  • QUOTES (1)

    • Street Cop: Lucy Hot Pants there thinks the guy died of spontaneous combustion.
      Robert Goren: Right after he was spontaneously hit in the head. I count three impact wounds in the right side of his skull.

  • NOTES (3)

  • ALLUSIONS (2)

    • Interestingly, this episode revealed many resemblances to The Night Listener by Armistead Maupin about Anthony Godby Johnson; a sick teenager who overcame a childhood of abuse and wrote a memoir based on his life, becoming very popular yet never meeting anybody. Speculation that the entire story was a hoax eventually surfaced and, in 2007, further information came to light showing this to be the case.

    • This episode appears to be ripped from the headlines of the Kaycee Nicole (Swenson) hoax.

More
Less
  • 10:00 pm
    20/20
    NEW
    ABC