Law & Order: Criminal Intent

Season 8 Episode 3

Identity Crisis

0
Aired Sunday 9:00 PM May 03, 2009 on USA
8.7
out of 10
User Rating
53 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
A man's murder puts Goren and Eames on the trail of an upper echelon businessman whose secrets have taken over his life and put him on the run.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Ending Saved It

    9.0
    CSI had a recent episode that was similar to 'Identity Crisis': it involved two brothers of humble means- one rises above by becoming a sociopathic chameleon. But I'm not here to argue that one was better or worse than the other... What impressed me was that the con-man character, his motives, and the ending made this episode memorable. If the villain wasn't after money, why all the charades? The initial flashbacks of his mother's demise had me fearing that his character would be oversimplified but he had a great chemistry with Detective Goren, who had a similarly rocky relationship with his mother. I was expecting Goren to flip him in the interrogation room as they do many criminals, catching him in a lie or revealing the evidence they had discovered against him- but instead, Criminal Intent used an amazing amount of subtlety and originality.moreless
  • A man is shot down in an alley and Goren and Eames must track down a man moving through the world of the elite who is probably responsible. The last ten minutes of this show could be some of the best TV ever!moreless

    9.5
    It was interesting that the brother who was taking on the persona's had worked at Princeton and you sort of wondered where those names he was using came from. I was waiting for the detectives to tie all that together. Once the Princeton piece came out that became an obvious trail to follow.



    Also I was a little surprised about how easily he was duping these women as people who have money usually are much more careful about those kind of things. The fact that the last woman's father had done the credit check and nothing came up. That is almost impossible these days.



    It was a great twist in the end when Goren came up with the fact that Thomas did not kill his mother, but basically took the rap that his brother put on him even though his brother could not have seen him based on the scenario they showed.



    Eames was eventually going to find the gun used in the murder, but Goren's last ten minutes with Thomas was some of the best TV ever. Yeah, they do this each week, but this was special. I can't believe this guy has never won any major acting awards. This scene with Sam Trammell was well acted by both actors and very believable with Goren getting Thomas to admit he shot his brother in his grief.



    Another fine episode of L&O:CI. Thanks for reading...moreless
Mireille Enos

Mireille Enos

Julianna Morgan

Guest Star

Lacey Kohl

Lacey Kohl

Mavis Rightmire

Guest Star

Peter Van Wagner

Peter Van Wagner

Cal Howard

Guest Star

Leslie Hendrix

Leslie Hendrix

Dr. Elizabeth Rodgers

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (4)

    • (As Goren walks into the interrogation room.)
      Tommy Burris: (scornfully chuckles) Hey. So you're it, huh? Rolled out the big gun.

    • (While reviewing his childhood.)
      Tommy Burris: It's history. I mean, who cares?
      Robert Goren: You should care. It's made you who you are.

    • (After reviewing with the DA possible charges against the suspect.)
      Danny Ross: Don't tell me that son of a bitch is gonna walk!

    • (Nantucket deputies bring the suspect up from the marsh.)
      Robert Goren: Thomas Burris.
      Tommy Burris: You've got the wrong guy, that's not my name.
      Alex Eames: Your fingerprints will prove you wrong.
      Tommy Burris: That's all you'll prove.

  • NOTES (1)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • Tommy Burris: Anthony was a failure. (volume rising) He was tyranny of the weak, but I didn't kill him!

      Since Oscar Wilde was referring to women, this metaphor is slightly off, but Burris is referencing a line from act three of Wilde's play, A Woman of No Importance: "The worst form of tyranny the world has ever known … the tyranny of the weak over the strong. It is the only tyranny that lasts."

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