Law & Order

Season 11 Episode 6

Burn Baby Burn

1
Aired Monday 10:00 PM Nov 22, 2000 on NBC
7.5
out of 10
User Rating
37 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Burn Baby Burn
AIRED:
A former Black Panther, accused of murdering a Caucasian police officer, questions Green's integrity amidst a politically charged trial.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • The cop killer evades the justice. The 60's revived.

    9.5
    I appreciate the Law and Order approach to cop killings and shooting at all: very rare are the episodes when a cop is shot or shoots, which underlines the actual statistics: some of the officers never shoot from their service gun during the whole line of duty. That is why this episode was special, and dramatic too, as soon as a cop is shot, everything is scrutinized by One Police Plaza and Lt. under constant pressure - but here the suspect happens to be a former Black Panther and with his arrest the old passions come back to life. It was a difficult trial, no one couldn't tell what kind of officer the victim really was, what actually happened in front of the door of the defendant's apartment, one moment I sympathized with the shooter, the Jack's final speech convinced me, nonetheless. And I expected the same from the jury: the guilty verdict, the bigger was then the surprise. An excellent episode, perfect acting, interesting plot and surprise at the end.moreless
  • Another solid and captivating episode with connections to the 1960s, always a satisfying topic when tackled by the writers of Law & Order.

    9.4
    Burn, Baby Burn! grabbed my interest the week before its original screening just because of its title. As a product of So Cal I recall fondly listening to my favorite radio station KGFJ 1230AM, Los Angeles one of the now gone classic Black music radio outlets in the 1960s with a team of intriguing on air personalities led by the legendary Magnificent Montague whose catch phrase was "burn, baby burn", a phrase he would use when a preferred song of his was played. After the Watts Rebelion of August 22nd, 1965, Montague was banned from using his trademark saying.



    This is a powerful episode, especially for those of us who lived the mid-to-late 1960s, as a teen or young adult. I found it to be provocative and Clarence Williams III was outstanding, his scenes on the stand holding up under the barrage dealt out by McCoy was flawless. I also enjoyed the chemistry between Briscoe and Green in the scenes leading up to the arrest of William's character, Latiff Miller.

    There was a blunder by the writers that was revealed when defense attorney Leon Chiles portrayed by Joe Morton argued for his client's "leery of police frame of mind" by citing previous actual police brutality incidents including the murder of Fred Hampton(a Black Panther) in Oakland, close but no cigar, the assassination of Fred Hampton & others (while they were sleeping) took place in the Windy City and was conducted by the Chicago Police. Despite the error of location for the Hampton murder by police, this was a most enjoyable episode I don't get tired of seeing as often as it is rerun



    Jon Jaxmoreless
Jerry Orbach

Jerry Orbach

Det. Lennie Briscoe

S. Epatha Merkerson

S. Epatha Merkerson

Lt. Anita Van Buren

Sam Waterston

Sam Waterston

Exec. ADA Jack McCoy

Angie Harmon

Angie Harmon

ADA Abbie Carmichael

Jesse L. Martin

Jesse L. Martin

Det. Ed Green

Dianne Wiest

Dianne Wiest

Interim DA Nora Lewin

Al Sapienza

Al Sapienza

Officer

Guest Star

Joseph Siravo

Joseph Siravo

Man

Guest Star

Chuck Cooper

Chuck Cooper

Rolando August

Guest Star

Joe Morton

Joe Morton

Leon Chiles

Recurring Role

Mike Hodge

Mike Hodge

Judge Delano Burns

Recurring Role

Victor Sierra

Victor Sierra

Jose Medina

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

    • Goof: When defense attorney Leon Chiles argues for his client's "leery of police frame of mind", he cites several actual police brutality cases including, "the murder of Fred Hampton in Oakland." This is incorrect as the murder of Fred Hampton took place in Chicago, not Oakland.

  • QUOTES (5)

    • Clerk: (during arraignment) People vs. Lateef Miller. Murder in the first degree.
      (Miller's followers in the gallery shout in protest; the judge bangs his gavel.)
      Judge Torledsky: If I hear another word from the gallery, I'm gonna clear the courtroom! How does the defendant plead?
      Leon Chiles: My client has a statement, your honor.
      Lateef Miller: Given that I'm here, as a political prisoner-
      Follower: -Tell 'em, Miller!
      Lateef Miller: The Geneva convention doesn't afford this court jurisdiction!
      (His followers shout in agreement, until Torledsky bangs his gavel again.)
      Judge Torledsky: That's enough! Mr. Miller, I'm entering a plea of not guilty.
      Abbie Carmichael: People request remand, your honor. Mr. Miller killed a police officer, and then fled the scene in order to avoid capture.
      Leon Chiles: He was praying at a mosque, your honor. He's a pillar of his community.
      Abbie Carmichael: The People are considering the death penalty.
      (The judge bangs his gavel for the renewed protest from the gallery.)
      Judge Torledsky: No bail. The defendant is remanded. Move on to motion.

    • Ed Green: You put your hands on an old man like that again, black or white, you and me are gonna have a problem!
      Officer Kanizar: That's funny, I was about to say to you, if you ever interfere with me in the middle of an investigation, we are going to have a big problem, and I'm going to solve it.
      Ed Green: Do it now!
      Officer Kanizar: Oh aren't you a big shot? What, now you're all shocked because we're away from the brothers?
      Ed Green: Hey man, I'll take you any time, anywhere.
      Officer Kanizar: Oh, like we don't know who's going to get all jammed up out of that and it certainly won't be the brother.
      Ed Green: You say brother like that one more time, I swear to God I'm going to stomp your ass into the pavement!
      Officer Kanizar: What side is your partner on, Lennie?
      Lennie Briscoe: Same side I'm on.

    • Nora Lewin: Don't beat yourself up too badly over this one, Jack.
      Jack McCoy: A man kills a New York City police detective in the line of duty, and I can't even convict him.
      Nora Lewin: Enough of the jury identified with the defendant's fear of cops.
      Jack McCoy: Used to be fear of cops didn't justify shooting them.
      Nora Lewin: Used to be a lot of things.

    • Anita van Buren: I'm sorry, I'm late for my daily spanking at One Police Plaza.

    • (On the way to notify Anne Kearsey about her husband's death)
      Ed Green: How many times have you done this?
      Anita van Buren: Twice. Two times too many.

  • NOTES (0)

  • ALLUSIONS (4)

    • "Burn, Baby, Burn" often was shouted during the widespread civil unrest during the sixties, especially by the rioters in Watts, CA in 1965.

    • Leon Chiles: The Abner Louima assault, the Amadou Diallo murder . . .
      Abbie Carmichael: The police in that case were acquitted.

      Both of these notorious cases involved African-American men and white NYPD officers. Louima was suspected of punching an officer during a brawl outside a nightclub. He was arrested, beaten, and sodomized with a broomstick while in custody, resulting in severe internal injuries. NYPD officer Justin Volpe was imprisoned for the assault and other officers were disciplined for their involvement. Amadou Diallo was shot dead by the NYPD, who had mistaken him for a wanted rapist and thought he was armed. He turned out to have been reaching for his wallet, not a gun. He was shot at 41 times and 19 shots hit him. A defense witness also refers to Diallo by saying, "41 shots at some poor black guy coming home from work." The officers involved in the shooting were acquitted after a criminal trial.

    • This episode appears to be ripped from the headlines of the H. Rap Brown case.

    • "Burn baby burn" is a well-known and oft-repeated line from the song "Disco Inferno."

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