Law & Order

Season 13 Episode 8

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1
Aired Monday 10:00 PM Nov 27, 2002 on NBC
7.9
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Episode Summary

EDIT
*
AIRED:
A star baseball player becomes the prime suspect in the murder of his limousine driver when it is discovered that the driver regularly supplied steroids to the sports icon. The subsequent investigation reveals blackmail as the underlying motive for the murder.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    Elisabeth Rohm

    Elisabeth Rohm

    ADA Serena Southerlyn

    Jerry Orbach

    Jerry Orbach

    Det. Lennie Briscoe

    S. Epatha Merkerson

    S. Epatha Merkerson

    Lt. Anita Van Buren

    Sam Waterston

    Sam Waterston

    Exec. ADA Jack McCoy

    Jesse L. Martin

    Jesse L. Martin

    Det. Ed Green

    Fred Dalton Thompson

    Fred Dalton Thompson

    DA Arthur Branch

    Reynaldo Rosales

    Reynaldo Rosales

    Kevin Seleeby

    Guest Star

    Josh Stamberg

    Josh Stamberg

    Martin Stanley

    Guest Star

    Jay O. Sanders

    Jay O. Sanders

    Alan Fenwick

    Guest Star

    J.K. Simmons

    J.K. Simmons

    Dr. Emil Skoda

    Recurring Role

    Leslie Hendrix

    Leslie Hendrix

    Dr. Elizabeth Rodgers

    Recurring Role

    Peter McRobbie

    Peter McRobbie

    Judge Walter Bradley

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (2)

      • When Serena tells Douglas Carrol of "Living Out" magazine that she is there about their profiles of gay New Yorkers, he misunderstands her and says that she's not famous enough. This foreshadows the revelation in Season 15's "Ain't No Love" that Serena is a lesbian.

      • Nitpick: McCoy certainly didn't put up much of an argument to justify getting the doctor to testify as to motive. The defense attorney is able to convince the judge that McCoy knows the blackmail was over Seleeby being gay, and therefore calling the doctor to establish motive about blackmail over steroids would be a violation of legal ethics because McCoy knows it isn't true. The judge's decision to disallow the doctor basically gives the defense attorney a double standard. McCoy should have argued that he only knows about the homosexual blackmail because the defense attorney made a mistake. If the original memo weren't delivered to the DA's office, the authorities would have pursued their original theory that the blackmail would have been over the steroids, and probably would have called the doctor to testify. And without knowledge to the contrary, McCoy's action would have been legit. It would therefore have been up to the defense to either accept the doctor testifying when they know it isn't true, or dispute that with the revelation Seleeby is gay. So McCoy could have pointed this out and might have gotten the judge to present the choice to the defense: either let the doctor testify or let the prosecution use the homosexual stuff. It's almost as if the defense sent the memo to purposely alert the DA of the gay lover knowing they could have it thrown out later and cut off any effort to present an alternate motive because the DA knows the truth. Yet everyone seems to accept it was simply an incompetent legal clerk rather than a purposeful tactic, and some acknowledgement of the idea would have been appropriate.

    • QUOTES (0)

    • NOTES (0)

    • ALLUSIONS (2)

      • While discussing the peccadilloes of various sports figures, Jack McCoy mentions Rae Carruth. Rae Carruth is a former football player who was convicted of conspiracy to murder his pregnant girlfriend and is serving a lengthy prison sentence. This case was explored earlier in the eleventh season episode "A Losing Season".

      • This episode appears to be ripped from the headlines of the Jayson Williams case. In 2002, Williams was believed to have shot and killed Costas Christofi, his limousine driver.

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