Law & Order

Season 14 Episode 22

Gaijin

1
Aired Monday 10:00 PM Apr 28, 2004 on NBC
8.4
out of 10
User Rating
41 votes
3

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
Gaijin
AIRED:
Van Buren has reservations about Branch's tactics in luring a Ginza nightclub owner back to New York after the Japanese government is unwilling to extradite him to face charges of conspiracy and murder in the death of his wife on a New York City vacation.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Guilty by stereotyping

    9.2
    SPOILER







    One of my favourite episodes from this season. A seemingly random murder is more than it appears. A story of matrimonial homicide hidden the beneath the veil of another homicide commited by a "black" person.



    A strong plot will carry you through from start to end, as a decent 1st act leads the viewer from a maze of misdirection and falsehood to uncover the real crime, redress the accusation of a foreign press (in Japan) that NY is unsafe by Fred. While Briscoe and Green take apart the false statement, when it become clear that the husband had a very strong motive to kill his wife.



    I did have some concerns as to some of the validity of the screenplay such as the husband being able to leave so soon, but I guess it was necessary to allow McCoy to come up with the nice trick to get him back.



    Because of the constant change in the situation and the relationships between victim, police, suspect and ADAs, the episode is fast paced and constantly keeping the view interested in the unfolding action.



    The highlight of the episode is the scene with jury selection, which is a not something usually done in L&O. That scene and the ones following it really hit home that a jury can never really be 100% independent in their view of the defendent, but at least there are safeguards tolimit this bias for trial.



    An excellent episode.moreless
  • This episode was about a Japanese man who hired his friend to kill his wife. He hopped his friend would take the blame for all himself but he did not. The Japanese government refused to hand him over so DA Branch was forced to lure him back to New York.moreless

    10
    This episode deserves a perfect 10/10. I had to agree that luring Yoshida back to New York was extreme but it was the only thing to do. I LOVED the scene at the airport between Yoshida, Briscoe, and Green. Leave it to Lennie to call handcuffs "bracelets" and call the arrest "a gift" from the city of New York. I also loved "Hang 'Em High" McCoy in the court room. His outrage towards Yoshida was awsome. I was pretty angry at Yoshida as well. I did NOT like the lawyer. It's like- "Your client did it now deal with it." It was totally an awsome episode.moreless
  • Can anyone truly be impartial?

    9.1
    Can anyone remain impartial in the jury box? That comes to issue in this episode, which features a Japanese national using the crime rate in New York City to cover up the assassination of his wife for her life insurance policy. A "victim" of a staged mugging that resulted in the death of his wife, Hiroji Yoshida blames a black man, but it is soon discovered that the shooter was another Japanese man who was a member of an organized criminal gang to whom Yoshida owed a million dollars in gambling debts. Rather than publicly announce their intention for extradition, the district attorney's office tricks Yoshida into returning to the United States, and then has him arrested. This disconcerts not only Anita Van Buren, but McCoy as well, in the belief that many will overlook the trail, and take away only the memory of having an innocent black man accused of the crime.



    What really comes into play, beyond the sheer arrogance of a foreigner attempting to use our country as an excuse to cover up his crimes, is the issue of racism and how it is ignited. McCoy wants to believe that the individuals on the jury can be impartial when it comes to reaching a verdict, but the defense argues that Yoshida's comments and accusations have tainted the jury pool. It's an interesting case because it brings up the issue of impartiality, and whether or not humans can truly be impartial. We are all influenced by the world around us, and carry opinions into the courtroom. This episode addresses that, but at the same time raises other issues not meant to become so poignant. That the issue of race came up at all signifies that our country is not yet bipartisan, or anti-racial. That it became an issue of a black man accused rather than simply a New Yorker bears thinking about.

    moreless
Elisabeth Rohm

Elisabeth Rohm

ADA Serena Southerlyn

Jerry Orbach

Jerry Orbach

Det. Lennie Briscoe

S. Epatha Merkerson

S. Epatha Merkerson

Lt. Anita Van Buren

Sam Waterston

Sam Waterston

Exec. ADA Jack McCoy

Jesse L. Martin

Jesse L. Martin

Det. Ed Green

Fred Dalton Thompson

Fred Dalton Thompson

DA Arthur Branch

Will Yun Lee

Will Yun Lee

Hiroji Yoshida

Guest Star

Spencer Garrett

Spencer Garrett

Stephen Olson

Guest Star

James Hiroyuki Liao

James Hiroyuki Liao

Bobby Ito

Guest Star

Gerry Bamman

Gerry Bamman

Judge Thomas Everton

Recurring Role

Donna Hanover

Donna Hanover

Judge Deborah Bourke

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (2)

    • This is one of only a handful of episodes in which the district attorney (Arthur Branch) shares a scene with a cop (Anita Van Buren).

    • Goof: The trial judge's name changes throughout the episode. In his first scene, the caption identifies him as "Harrison Taylor". Later, the name on his office door is "Thomas Sommers". In the final scenes, as the verdict is being read, the name plate on his bench reads "Thomas Everton".

  • QUOTES (3)

    • Reporter: Mr. Yoshida, Mr. Yoshida, Mr. Yoshida, what was your reaction when you heard police had apprehended a suspect in your wife's death?
      Mr. Yoshida: Relief. And also sadness. Nothing can bring Tamiko back but I'm glad the man who did this will pay for his crime.
      Lennie Briscoe: Yeah, so are we.
      Mr. Yoshida: Detectives.
      Ed Green: We just wanted to welcome you back personally.
      Det. Lennie Briscoe: Yeah, we brought you a gift from the city of New York. You like jewelry?
      Mr. Yoshida: I don't understand.
      Det. Lennie Briscoe: Bracelets. (handcuffs Yoshida)

    • Lennie Briscoe: If isn't Walker, we're staring at a blank wall.
      Anita van Buren: Then fill in the damn blanks!

    • Lennie Briscoe (about the Japanese tourists getting shot): That'll wreck your vacation.

  • NOTES (0)

  • ALLUSIONS (2)

    • This episode appears to be ripped from the headlines of the Kazuyoshi Miura murder case. Miura, a Japanese businessman, was traveling in Los Angeles in 1981 with his wife when she was shot in a parking lot. Since it was assumed that a US citizen was responsible, the incident resulted in a lot of bad publicity for the US among Japanese nationals. However, Miura was eventually convicted of murdering his wife (though in Japan) but the verdict was set aside by their high court a few years later. In 2008, however, he was finally arrested by the US and was expected to stand trial. However after being extradited to Los Angeles, he either committed suicide (according the the police) or was killed in jail (according to his defense attorney).

    • The episode title is a Japanese word meaning 'foreigner'.

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