Law & Order

Season 13 Episode 17

Genius

2
Aired Monday 10:00 PM Apr 02, 2003 on NBC
7.6
out of 10
User Rating
37 votes
4

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
Genius
AIRED:
Investigating the murder of a cab driver, the detectives come to suspect a famous author and his protege, a former child prodigy.

Who was the Episode MVP ?

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Interesting plot if somewhat lacklustre

    7.5
    Ok so not the most convincigng plot, but it succeeds in providing a story that works. Personally I found this episode to be of those episodes that I didnt care that much for, but it entertained me insofar as I could switch off.



    I didnt particular feel anything for the genius' plight. If the point was for viewers to feel sympathy for him, then it failed to do so for me. Would I treat a rare bird in the wild more differently than a pidgeon for instance? Sure, probably. But when it comes to crime, punishment and someone who has an amazing human talent, then no. Why would anyone, especially for someone who just killed the cab driver for some meaningless motive, then no sorry.



    In the end I was hoping that he would be locked up for life. Thats the punishment and if he wasnt intelligent enough to know that before he did it then.....



    So maybe in that regard, the episode worked on some level.moreless
  • A fugitive-turned-cab driver is murdered. The investigation leads to a genius author whose sole condition for pleading guilty is that he gets the death penalty, as he doesn't want to do life in jail.moreless

    8.2
    I do not agree with my fellow reviewer who thinks that this episode was a 5. This was a great episode.



    The episode examines-



    1- How truly screwed up and nihilistic our greatest writers have been.



    2- How we, regardless of our flag-waving 'All men are created equal', will always have a scale, weighing the perpetrator (a troubled but genius author with great literary contributions) against the victim (a racist who, while awaiting a second trial for burning down a black church and killing two children, was found with child porn and jumped bail).



    3- Whether or not we should execute someone who still can contribute alot to society.moreless
  • A great episode.

    10
    I caught this episode while i was flicking through the channels and from the beginning i was hooked. The story was simple yet compelling. An author kills a cab driver because he does not like him, and that is what he says in court and he atuallt pleeds the death penalty. So after the Green and Brisco gather the evidence Jack send him down. But in the end we are faced to question whether it was the right decision to have genius killed just because he has murdered someone. Overall as i said before i thought this was a great episode and i am really looking forward to the next one.moreless
  • A Writer who has committed Murder wants the Death Penalty

    5.0
    A very strange episode. It builds up with the usual evidence searching and suspects, eliminating one possible suspect when DNA puts the writer (Garner) at the scene when the crime was committed. The part I cannot fathom out is why McCoy agrees to ask for the death Penalty when the defendant asks for it. Surely in a case such as this its up to those proscecuting through the District Attorney to ask for death penalty if they sincerely believe it is justified, but after they offered manslaughter? I think this was one of the episodes we get when the writers are looking for something new but this one was not really plausible.moreless
Elisabeth Rohm

Elisabeth Rohm

ADA Serena Southerlyn

Jerry Orbach

Jerry Orbach

Det. Lennie Briscoe

S. Epatha Merkerson

S. Epatha Merkerson

Lt. Anita Van Buren

Sam Waterston

Sam Waterston

Exec. ADA Jack McCoy

Jesse L. Martin

Jesse L. Martin

Det. Ed Green

Fred Dalton Thompson

Fred Dalton Thompson

DA Arthur Branch

Stanley Anderson

Stanley Anderson

Nelson Lambert

Guest Star

Sonia Braga

Sonia Braga

Helen

Guest Star

David Wike

David Wike

Clay Warner

Guest Star

David Rosenbaum

David Rosenbaum

Judge Alan Berman

Recurring Role

J.K. Simmons

J.K. Simmons

Dr. Emil Skoda

Recurring Role

Lauren Klein

Lauren Klein

Judge Carla Solomon

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (6)

    • Ira Simpkis: Weren't you in my first-year Criminal Law class? Back row, on the left? A-minus, if I remember correctly.
      Serena Southerlyn: A.
      Ira Simpkis: I was always surprised, I have to admit, that you never took my Trial Efficiency class, because we handled real cases and you might have benefited a little from the work.
      Serena Southerlyn: No offense, but I didn't care for your clients.

    • Ed Green: You son of a bitch. You killed him, didn't you?
      Nelson Lambert: Did I?

    • (After Ed had an informal discussion with a suspect that led to a partial confession.)
      Anita Van Buren: Five hours? I hope the hell he called you in the morning.
      Ed Green: Hey, the best way to get a drunk to open his mouth is to let him drink, isn't that right, Lennie?
      Lennie Briscoe: (Looking up from his desk) Hear, hear.

    • Arthur Branch: (about Warner's writing) Easy answer is it's just words on paper.
      Jack McCoy: What's the other answer?
      Arthur Branch: (holds up the Penal Law book) So is this.

    • Anita van Buren: Book report's due at 3.
      Lennie Briscoe: (still reading the book) Dog ate mine.

    • Nelson Lambert: Do you know what the difference between killing and murder is, detective?
      Ed Green: Yeah. Twenty-five to life.

  • NOTES (0)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • This episode appears to be ripped from the headlines of both the Gary Gilmore case as well as the Jack Abbott case. Gilmore - who was executed by firing squad - had his life and trial profiled by author Norman Mailer in the novel, The Executioner's Song, which was made into a TV movie of the same name.

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