Law & Order

Season 18 Episode 7

Quit Claim

1
Aired Monday 10:00 PM Feb 06, 2008 on NBC
9.1
out of 10
User Rating
61 votes
7

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
A hit-and-run investigation leads back to a title company, but Green, Rubirosa and Lupo's undercover work takes a surprising twist that pits McCoy against the U.S. Attorney's office.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • The big con.

    9.5
    This episode is why I watch the show. Kim Brodie is a con artist (played by the lovely January Jones of "Mad Men" fame). She keeps the detectives on a goose chase of a con.



    After being caught she cons the legal aid lawyer. Then she cons the feds, then the Grand Jury. Wow! A great tale. Then the ADA is tempted to fight fire with fire, but even he has limits. He and Rubirosa are a good pair. And Detective Lupo is shown as a deeper charachter, studying for law school.



    For me, "Law and Order" has had a renaissance this season. This episode proves why.moreless
  • Complex, suspenseful, and compelling episode. Dick Wolf and the writers are Back On Form ! Hopefully, we'll get a continuing villain in the con-woman played by Ms. January Jones.

    10
    (Spoilers here)



    This episode presents a wily and charming villain, almost (but not quite) on the order of Goren's nemesis, Nicole Wallace (Olivia D'Abo) in Criminal Intent. The Nicole character benefits from her personal and repeated mental confrontation with Goren.



    January Jones plays the role of a con-woman who manipulates criminals, police, the DA, her own lawyer and the Feds to evade prosecution for eight murders. And like Nicole Wallace, she always seems one step ahead of the prosecutors. If the writers expand her character, and make her struggle with the DA more personal, she could approach a legendary stature in LO.



    The complex, insightful writing in this episode achieves a level once-seen in LO:Criminal Intent (although that show's writing has been badly neglected over the past few years.)



    As the police and DA's office attempt to keep up with her, they follow a trail just a bit too clever to follow, and she disappears into the unsure custody of the Feds - Hopefully to be seen in LO again!



    Great show!moreless
  • An Iago-like con-artist leads police from a double hit-and-run murder to a huge real-estate scam to a quintuple robbery-murder to a partner-murder then, in a bid to escape punishment, pits McCoy against a Federal Prosecutor chasing imaginary terrorists.moreless

    9.5
    A Brilliant Episode! After watching some of the other episodes of this season, I thought that we were going to be stuck with another Season 17. Then I watched this episode and now I think that we might just beat out Gunsmoke for longest running series.



    The biggest thing the episode went for was plotting, plotting, plotting. And it worked amazingly.



    Found in an abandoned hit-and-run car is a stack of sequential bills. Following the money (an "All the President's Men" reference?) into a real-estate scam, Green and Lupo trace it back to mobsters. Suspecting that someone robbed the mobsters and had the misfortune to run down two people with their getaway car, Green and Lupo go undercover to get at a likely robber, the man who masterminded the scheme. Helping them is Kim Brody, played brilliantly by January Jones, who was the unwitting inside woman on the real estate scheme. Pretending to help, she gets police running to the other side of town while the mastermind and all his mobster friends (yes, they were his friends) are obliterated by gunfire. The episode's final body is found just outside the mob place-turned-morgue, an escaped prisoner from Florida. He is also carrying a submachine gun.



    It seems to be that he commited the mass murder, then was executed by his partner. The only suspect is Kim, the one who sent them off in the wrong direction.



    Arresting her, the DA attempts to strengthen the case against her by proving that she is a wanted fugitive who helped the Florida prisoner escape. They uncover a partial fingerprint with matches Kim's inconclusively and attempt to find the real Kim Brody whose identity the woman is using.



    When "Kim's" attempt to get at the scam-money falls apart, she goes into endgame by bringing in the feds. The feds have apparently been fooled by her into believing that terrorists have also been putting into the real estate scam. Now they are attempting to protect their witness from prosecution by playing the Patriot Act as a trump card. McCoy finangles Kim back into NYC but it takes too long. She is able to make use of a time limit which only gives the DA 48 hours to indict. While they scramble to get the story into the grand jury, Kim calmly testifies to and cons them, which no-bills her.



    She then walks out of the court a free woman. Just as the episode ends, the fugitive's fingerprint is matched to a Jane Doe corpse and Kim Brody is found living in Virginia. Thus, we are left with the question of who she is (A "Day of the Jackal" reference?).



    Not only were the writers able to fit all that into one hour, they were still able to slide in a little character development. Lupo is seen studing law, and Rubirosa reveals that she was fat as a teen.



    Most importantly, we get to see how far Cutter's ethics can be stretched. Early in the episode, McCoy sees that the case is a fools errand and backs off the prosecution. Later in the episode, Rubirosa jumps off when Cutter decides to subborn perjury. At the last second, when Cutter could continue and maybe win his case by allowing the perjury, he takes the high road and backs off. Winning isn't everything, after all.



    All in all, a excellent episode.moreless
  • An interesting case if not the best certainly kept me captivated. A nice bit of diversion with the mob angle and ending it to show us an embezzler with a homicidal streak. I liked what little of the bad guy we saw of her. She played the innocent girlmoreless

    8.8
    An interesting case if not the best certainly kept me captivated. A nice bit of diversion with the mob angle and ending it to show us an embezzler with a homicidal streak. I liked what little of the bad guy we saw of her. She played the innocent girl next door. All the while Lupo and Green were linking her to multiple murders. The jurisdictional snafu with the US District Attorney was done very well. I have to admit as much fun as it was it was a tad silly having two feds arrested to get a witness back. I also enjoyed the internal battle between Mccoy and his DA's and their slips into going too far sometimes. Nice night with L&O not great but certainly a well done episode.moreless
  • Now comes Dick Wolf with his latest, continuing villainess, ('the one who got away?') to begin a trilogy (quadrilogy??) ala the Australian chick on L&O-CI. If you didn't see it, don't read anything more about this episode until you do...moreless

    9.9
    Could you feel it coming when you looked at the clock and knew there was not enough time for the proper resolution of this case (you know - the one you were looking for)... Can't say too much more, but you'd better find a way to see this one (before the next 'well-timed' installment) if you want to stay in the loop. Praise/Damn Dick Wolf and his insidious/ingenious writers for this one. I am already more invested in this eventual 3 or 4 episode serial than I ever was in the 'CI' epoch with the 'Australian Sinistress'. If this lying, cheating, two-timing conniving 'biatch' doesn't get her come-uppance, television as we know it (you know, pre/post Law & Order) may not survive. "Hold on to your lug nuts," and stay tuned?moreless
Jeremy Sisto

Jeremy Sisto

Det. Cyrus Lupo

Linus Roache

Linus Roache

Exec. A.D.A. Michael Cutter

S. Epatha Merkerson

S. Epatha Merkerson

Lt. Anita Van Buren

Jesse L. Martin

Jesse L. Martin

Det. Ed Green

Sam Waterston

Sam Waterston

D.A. Jack McCoy

Alana De La Garza

Alana De La Garza

A.D.A. Connie Rubirosa

January Jones

January Jones

Kim Brody

Guest Star

Greg Keller

Greg Keller

Peter Berbatov

Guest Star

Daniel Jenkins

Daniel Jenkins

A.U.S.A. Richard Cassidy

Guest Star

Joe Forbrich

Joe Forbrich

Det. Cormack

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (5)

    • Michael Cutter: (about a photo of Connie from high school) Whoa. I might have stood a chance with you back then.

    • Jack McCoy: You're a grownup ... you're on your own. I'm getting off the train.
      Michael Cutter: How about you?
      Connie Rubirosa: All aboard.

    • Cyrus Lupo: Hey man, are you, like, a socks-on guy or a socks-off? You know.
      Ed Green: Yeah, yeah, I know.
      Cyrus Lupo: Well, I get cold feet, so to be considerate I, uh, wear socks, you know?
      Ed Green: I get it, man, I just can't believe you're telling me that.

    • Anita Van Buren: We might need a little prosecutorial pressure.
      Connie Rubirosa: Hmm, that's my specialty.

    • Ed Green: Stolen money, stolen car. Hit-and-run's only the tip of this iceberg, I bet.

  • NOTES (0)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • This episode appears to be ripped from the headlines of a number of sub-prime mortages scandals. The scam that Green and Lupo uncover concerns a crew taking advantage of people who are losing their homes due to sub-prime lending. These are loans made to people with less than a 'prime' credit rating and this has led to a downturn in the U.S. and world economies.

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