Law & Order

Season 9 Episode 24

Refuge Pt. 2

1
Aired Monday 10:00 PM May 26, 1999 on NBC
8.7
out of 10
User Rating
44 votes
5

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
Refuge Pt. 2
AIRED:
McCoy and Carmichael risk violating the civil liberties of witnesses when they are forced to jail them in order to safely continue their investigation.

Who was the Episode MVP ?

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Excellent finish to an Excellent two parter

    10
    Law & Order pulls no punches, finishing not only by trying a bank executive for enterprise corruption, but also by giving Abbie Carmichael(Angie Harmon) actual depth, something many of the other ADA's and even a few of the DA's seem to lack. In addition, this was Benjamin Bratt's final contract appearance, and while I didn't love his character(Rey Curtis) he at least had chemistry with his on-screen partner.
  • russian mob characters-not my thing

    1.0
    I didnt really find this episode enjoyable. I dont know why, but Russian, or russian Mob characters just arnt appealing to me. i would love to see more Italian mob characters than any other group, mainly because were so attatched to them, and we find that italian-american stereo-type so fascinating. well, thats just my view
  • the perfect episode

    10
    Refuge Parts 1 and 2 are the epitome of what was good about 90s Law & Order- It's unlikely they'll ever make one like this again. Despite its complex plot, both halves of the episode are clear, enthralling and have since been imitated again and again on prime time crime dramas, but never so well.



    Between the child witness, threatened jurors, hitmen- there was enough material for a stand alone film- and contrary to the other reviewers opinion, I applaud their choice to not to use cliche Italian mobsters. Perhaps, the most resonant aspect of Refuge is the senseless murder of Antonella Ricci- a character who appears in only one episode but was so well written, deep, and interesting, that her death fills us with as much outrage as Jack McCoy.moreless
  • My favorite episode

    10
    I love this episode more every time I watch it. Why? It can be summed up in two words: Angie Harmon.



    This is one of the best episodes she was in, and one of the best episodes in the series. She was so convincing, portraying a woman who has had a close friend brutally murdered. The amazing thing is, we see the toughest ADA McCoy ever had crying more than once in the show. One of the best moments is at the end of McCoy's closing statements. The camera shows Abbie's face, with one single tear falling down her cheek.



    I think I like this episode so much because we get to see a softer side of Abbie. She experienced so much loss in her life, first with her rape in college and then the murder of a close friend and colleague. It's impossible not to feel some sympathy for her.



    L&O needs to make more episodes like this.moreless
  • Gripping Conclusion

    10
    This review is for the "Refuge" Two-Parter. McCoy and Carmichael, as well as the New York Cops find that there is a price to pay for going against the Russian Mafia as the mafia teams up with Colombians in an attempt to terrorize witnesses, including a poor boy whose only parent would then be savagely murdered by these menaces. This is all for an elaborate money-laundering scheme taking place right in New York's Backyard. My only regret of this episode is that the defendants are not put to death for their crimes, after all, they did order the murder of a witness and an officer of the court......moreless
Steven Hill

Steven Hill

DA Adam Schiff

Jerry Orbach

Jerry Orbach

Det. Lennie Briscoe

S. Epatha Merkerson

S. Epatha Merkerson

Lt. Anita Van Buren

Sam Waterston

Sam Waterston

Exec. ADA Jack McCoy

Benjamin Bratt

Benjamin Bratt

Det. Reynaldo "Rey" Curtis

Angie Harmon

Angie Harmon

ADA Abbie Carmichael

Tom Mason

Tom Mason

 

Guest Star

Sherman Howard

Sherman Howard

 

Guest Star

Terry L. Beaver

Terry L. Beaver

 

Guest Star

Ben Shenkman

Ben Shenkman

Nick Margolis

Recurring Role

Nicholas J. Giangiulio

Nicholas J. Giangiulio

Doorman

Recurring Role

Ron Parady

Ron Parady

Judge Gary Kendrick

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

    • This episode marks two rare situations:
      1) The district attorney (Adam Schiff) appears at a crime scene.
      2) The district attorney (Adam Schiff) shares a scene with one or more cops (Lennie Briscoe, Anita Van Buren & Rey Curtis).

  • QUOTES (6)

    • Jack McCoy: (after the murders of ADA Ricci and Mrs. Woodson) I wanna know how this disaster happened.
      Lennie Briscoe: Best guess, Ricci was followed from work.
      Jack McCoy: Why wasn't a police officer stationed in the apartment?!
      Anita Van Buren: In a one-bedroom? That would've been cozy. We tried putting someone downstairs in the vestibule, but the tenants complained!
      Jack McCoy: Lieutenant, I don't have to tell you...!
      Anita Van Buren: No. You don't. We're treating this like Ricci was one of our own. What are you gonna do about this retrial?
      Jack McCoy: I don't know.

    • Constantine Volsky: (after his sentencing.) Go ahead. Try and kill me. I'm not afraid. I'm tough. I'll survive.

    • Jack McCoy: (his closing summation) Following the rules does not put you above the law. Just ask the Swiss bankers who appropriated the unclaimed accounts of Holocaust victims. Following the rules does not explain how someone who runs a bank could be so incompetent, so gullible. There can be only one explanation. Mr. Radford willingly turned a blind eye to what was obviously a criminal enterprise. And the Russian mob didn't have to cut off his uncle's hands to get him to do it. All they had to do was wave a fat commission in front of him. Now, some might think that money laundering is just some white-collar crime far removed from our everyday concerns. Let me remind you what money laundering is really about. Mr. Radford made his commission on the backs of these people. This country has always been a beacon to the world for liberty and justice. That's why we keep our borders open. But we're also a beacon for another kind of people, for criminals and con men. We rely on the law to protect us from them. Sometimes, that's not enough. Do we need more law, less freedom? Do we cross out parts of the Constitution? I've learned that's not the answer. The answer is that each one of us is responsible to everyone else. Not one of us can afford to turn a blind eye. By respecting the laws we do have, by living up to the true meaning of the word "citizen," we preserve our common good. Through his deliberate ignorance, Mr. Radford allowed a criminal enterprise to flourish. Innocent people to be killed. He allowed a cancer to grow. This is where it has to stop. Here in this court room, with you.

    • Adam Schiff: I see. You're planning to violate three, no, five amendments to the Constitution.
      Jack McCoy: It's time someone talked to Mr. Volsky in a language he understands.
      Adam Schiff: And what language is that?
      Jack McCoy: Adam, unless you order me not to do it ...
      Adam Schiff: I'm ordering you! (Schiff leaves)
      Jack McCoy: (to Carmichael) Hand me that stack of arrest warrants.

    • Jack McCoy: They turned their country into a thieves' paradise. Now they're doing it to us.

    • Abbie Carmichael: The Russians are positioning themselves as money launderers to the world.
      Adam Schiff: Lenin must be spinning in his mausoleum.

  • NOTES (2)

  • ALLUSIONS (2)

    • This episode appears to be ripped from the headlines of the vast number of money laundering scams that took place in the 1980s and 1990s, where vast sums of money would be flown from JFK to Moscow but no one would ever interfere, in large part because they didn't want to take on the Russian mafia.

    • Schiff: Lenin must be spinning in his mausoleum.

      Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924) was a leader of the Bolshevik revolution in Russia and the first leader of the Soviet Union. Lenin's body has been on display in a glass sided mausoleum in Red Square since his death. This mausoleum is one of the top tourist attractions in Moscow.

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