Law & Order

Season 3 Episode 1

Skin Deep

1
Aired Monday 10:00 PM Sep 23, 1992 on NBC
8.4
out of 10
User Rating
41 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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After photographer Julian Decker is found murdered in his studio, Logan and Cerreta discover that Decker's real business was prostitution and acting as a pimp for models who aren't getting the work they needed. Their investigation leads to Angela Brandt, one of Decker's models who found more money working for Decker in other ways, but they also discover that Decker was romantically involved with Angela's teenage daughter. Stone realizes that something strange is going on when the case gets weaker against Angela, but all of a sudden she wants to cut a deal.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • My So-Called Legs

    8.7
    "I know I'm pretty, I'm just not that good with boys," says Claire Danes as Tracy Brandt, but deep down her character is not nearly as confident as she wants to appear. This is a weird foreshadowing of Danes' most famous character, Angela Chase, who she'd start playing two years later in "My So-Called Life".



    When I last saw this episode 5-10 years ago, I just recognized Danes, but this time I've noticed some other guest stars. The woman who discovers the body is Gina Flores, who would go on to appear in the short-lived TV series "Firefly" and have an interesting series of guest appearances on "Angel". One of Brandt's classmates is played by Lauren Ambrose, who would not only go on to larger, much more interesting Law & Order appearances, but also co-star in "Six Feet Under".



    This episode is the first listed TV or movie appearance for all three in the IMDB.moreless
  • Not quite the finest season opener.

    7.4
    Season 3 of „Law & Order“ kicked off in a hardly impressive fashion. Altough season premiere „Skin Deep“ wasn\'t really a terrible show, it wasn\'t very good either, especially when compared with brilliant season 2 opener „Confession“.



    Cerreta and Logan investigate a murder of a second-rate photographer, who also happens to be a second-rate pimp. Police part of the show is consumed with detectives interviewing good-looking women, which is a plus in the eyes of every heterosexual male viewer, but that\'s just about it. Rest is a quite usual stuff. At least there are some nice punchlines from Cerreta (\"The senile judge\").



    I could smell the plot-twist that would take place deep in „Order“ part the second the murderer was introduced, something that didn\'t happen that often in early „L&O“ episodes. Still, Michael Moriarty\'s usually strong performance and Lorraine Toussiant\'s always interesting guest turn as defense attorney Shambala Green carry the second half of the show. Season 3 didn\'t really have a slam-bang start like the previous one, but fortunately, better things were ahead of us. Even if it isn\'t one of season\'s finest, „Skin Deep“ is still good, entertaining TV. It is probably superior to the most of stuff that is now on network TV, new episodes of „Law & Order“ included.moreless
Paul Sorvino

Paul Sorvino

Sgt. Phil Cerreta

Steven Hill

Steven Hill

D.A. Adam Schiff

Dann Florek

Dann Florek

Capt. Don Cragen

Carolyn McCormick

Carolyn McCormick

Dr. Elizabeth Olivet

Chris Noth

Chris Noth

Det. Mike Logan

Michael Moriarty

Michael Moriarty

Exec. A.D.A. Ben Stone

Gina Torres

Gina Torres

Laura Elkin

Guest Star

Alberta Watson

Alberta Watson

Angela Brandt

Guest Star

Scotty Bloch

Scotty Bloch

Judge Naomi Baum

Guest Star

Lorraine Toussaint

Lorraine Toussaint

Shambala Green

Recurring Role

Donald Corren

Donald Corren

Medill

Recurring Role

David Rosenbaum

David Rosenbaum

Judge Alan Berman

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

  • QUOTES (12)

    • Phil Cerreta: So you never turned a trick, huh?
      Betty Ann Carter: Most beauty contests, some cracker judge would walk up, put his hands on my ass and offer me more money than I'd ever seen to be his "date". I didn't do it then, I don't do it now. That does not mean I have any cause to look down on those who do.
      Mike Logan: That's real democratic of you.
      Betty Ann Carter: Well, it's a free country. At least I don't drink from the taxpayer's trough like some people.

    • Betty Ann Carter: Sure, he asked me to do it! $2500 a week on my back instead of $500 on my feet.
      Mike Logan: Well, it must have been tempting.
      Betty Ann Carter: Maybe to you. But honey, I don't think you'd survive. In my experience, cops just can't perform that often.

    • Betty Ann Carter: Poor Julian. May he rest in Hell. Who do you think killed him?
      Phil Cerreta: We think he had a girlfriend.
      Betty Ann Carter: Oh. I see. Last night? I was on a revolving pedestal pointing at the kind of yacht I used to cruise on. Boat show. The Meadowlands. Better than what a lot of girls end up doing.
      Phil Cerreta: You mean to supplement their income?
      Betty Ann Carter: (pointing to her face) What do you think you do when this goes (gestures to her breasts) and these are all you have left?

    • Alan Rohmer: I was casting an airline commercial. I needed a stewardess.
      Mike Logan: Oh, yeah? Well, fly me! My initials are A.B.

    • Mike Logan: Hey Phil, you know that warrant you told the health club guy you'd get? Exactly what probable cause did you have in mind?
      Phil Cerreta: A senile judge.

    • (Discussing interviewing a number of models.)
      Phil Cerreta: Look on the bright side -- we do this all week, you'll never have to buy Playboy again.
      Mike Logan: What are you saying, I treat all women like objects?
      Phil Cerreta: More specifically, like furniture.

    • Ben Stone: Okay, it's not a walk in the park.
      Adam Schiff: Yes it is. You're going to get mugged.

    • Don Cragen: She's a hooker, Paul. She slept with her pimp, she got very angry, and she stabbed him. Call Eyewitness News, we've never seen anything like this in New York City before.

    • Adam Schiff: When did we turn this office over to the Marx Brothers?

    • Mike Logan: Well, first she said she was with her ex-husband. Then it turns out she's at the ad agency.
      Don Cragen: She's breaking the law, Mike! What do you want her to say? 'Oh, that's right, Officer, I was out turning tricks.'

    • Ben Stone: Did she lie about her income, too? Or are you changing your standards at legal aid?
      Shambala Green: Oh, no no no, she's just flatbacking until she can liquidate a major position at IBM.

    • Shambala Green: I'll tell the jury she's on trial because prostitutes are easy targets. She was used by her johns, abused by her pimp, and desperate to support her daughter.
      Ben Stone: What am I hearing? A prostitute's manifesto? Hookers of the world unite, kill your oppressors?

  • NOTES (3)

  • ALLUSIONS (3)

    • Mike Logan: Oh, yeah? Well, fly me! My initials are A.B.

      Before Dick Wolf got into television, he was a very successful ad man. One of his most memorable ad campaigns was for National Airlines, in which a stewardess seductively says 'I'm Carol. Fly me!'

    • Ben Stone: What am I hearing? A prostitute's manifesto? Hookers of the world unite, kill your oppressors?

      This is a reference to the Communist Manifesto. Karl Marx wrote, "Workers of the world unite, you have nothing to lose but your chains."

    • Judge Baum: Could we look at the law, please. The standard is Frye v. United States. The evidence must have gained general acceptance in the field in which it belongs.

      In Frye v. United States (1923), James Frye was convicted of murder in the second degree. He appealed the decision because his defense offered an expert witness to present his results on a 'systolic blood pressure deception test' (a precursor to the lie detector) but was denied. The prosecution argued that admissible expert scientific testimony should be based on well-recognized methods that have gained general acceptance in the field to which it belongs, and the deception test did not meet that criterion. This stance was upheld by the appeals court.

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