Law & Order

Season 9 Episode 19

Tabula Rasa

2
Aired Monday 10:00 PM Apr 21, 1999 on NBC
8.2
out of 10
User Rating
39 votes
0

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
Tabula Rasa
AIRED:
After a philosophy professor is pushed in front of a subway and killed, the investigation leads to a suspect who, following a divorce, changed his identity and disappeared with his daughters.

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Today
3:00am
TNT
4:00am
Fed
TNT
5:00am
TNT
6:00am
TNT
TNT
7:00am
Fed
TNT
8:00am
TNT
9:00am
TNT
10:00am
TNT
Sunday
4:00am
TNT
5:00am
TNT
6:00am
TNT
7:00am
TNT
8:00am
TNT
9:00am
TNT
11:00am
TNT
Monday
4:00am
TNT
3:00pm
WGNAMER
SUND
4:00pm
SUND
5:00pm
SUND
6:00pm
SUND
7:00pm
SUND
8:00pm
SUND
9:00pm
SUND
10:00pm
SUND
11:30pm
SUND
SUBMIT REVIEW
    Steven Hill

    Steven Hill

    DA Adam Schiff

    Jerry Orbach

    Jerry Orbach

    Det. Lennie Briscoe

    S. Epatha Merkerson

    S. Epatha Merkerson

    Lt. Anita Van Buren

    Sam Waterston

    Sam Waterston

    Exec. ADA Jack McCoy

    Benjamin Bratt

    Benjamin Bratt

    Det. Reynaldo "Rey" Curtis

    Angie Harmon

    Angie Harmon

    ADA Abbie Carmichael

    Jay O. Sanders

    Jay O. Sanders

    Bill Fallon

    Guest Star

    Maggie Low

    Maggie Low

    Eleanor Taska

    Guest Star

    Anne Bobby

    Anne Bobby

    Sylvia Fallon

    Guest Star

    Larry S. Gregory

    Larry S. Gregory

    Court Officer

    Recurring Role

    Larry Clarke

    Larry Clarke

    Morris LaMotte

    Recurring Role

    J.K. Simmons

    J.K. Simmons

    Dr. Emil Skoda

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (10)

      • Lennie Briscoe: I'd hate for somebody to trace me by what I read.
        Rey Curtis: You read, Lennie?

      • Sylvia Fallon: When Alexis was four years old, she learned to tie her shoes in one afternoon.
        Jack McCoy: How is that miraculous?
        Sylvia Fallon: She practiced tying it for hours until she got it. How many children can do that?
        Jack McCoy: At four years old?
        Sylvia Fallon: William did that.
        Jack McCoy: Did he do it by telling her that daddy wouldn't love her anymore unless she could tie her shoes by sundown? Did the bow have to be in the exact center? Did the loops have to be the same size?

      • Jack McCoy: Did William Fallon terrorize those girls by threatening to withhold his love for them if they didn't do exactly what he wanted?
        Sylvia Fallon: Yes.
        William Fallon: You can't let her do that. The only reason I married her was so my children would have a mother.

      • Elanor Taska: He used to tell them 'only bad girls soil their diapers', 'only bad girls cry'.
        Jack McCoy: From what point on?
        Elanor Taska: Birth.
        Jack McCoy: He thought they could understand?
        Elanor Taska: It was a process. When Susan was four and she would finish playing with a toy and she didn't put it back exactly as she found it, William broke it right in front of her and told her 'only bad girls disobey daddy'.

      • Sylvia Fallon: Those girls are his whole life...and him theirs.
        Abbie Carmichael: And where does that put you?

      • (Talking about her controlling husband.)
        Sylvia Fallon: He wouldn't want us to be late.
        Abbie Carmichael: So you're late? And what, he starts rearranging the teacups?

      • Jack McCoy: How'd the jury react?
        Abbie Carmichael: Seven were stone-faced, three felt sorry for her and two thought you were being mean.

      • Lennie Briscoe: What do we got? Another nut case pushing people off the platforms?
        Rey Curtis: Don't know yet, maybe she fell.
        Lennie Briscoe: Yeah, maybe I'm Santa Claus.

      • Mr. O'Connor: We've got trains stacked up all the way to 86th Street.
        Lennie Briscoe: Yeah, I'm sure the dead woman is sorry for the inconvenience.
        Mr. O'Connor: Well, the transit authority is proud of its "on time" record, detective.
        Lennie Briscoe: It's a source of pride for all of us, Mr. O'Connor.

      • Jack McCoy: It's like Jonestown without the Kool-Aid.

    • NOTES (1)

      • During syndicated reruns on TNT, Benjamin Bratt, Sam Waterson and Angie Harmon are not in the opening credits, but Chris Noth and Michael Moriarty are.

    • ALLUSIONS (3)

      • Lennie Briscoe: It's all yours, Benito.

        Briscoe is talking to the subway official who was pressing him to release the murder scene, a station, to him, so he could get the trains running. It is said that among the harsh features of Benito Mussolini's regime in Italy has been the contrasting statement, "But he made the trains run on time." It is apocryphal, at best.

      • This episode appears to be ripped from the headlines of the Rachael and Lisa Martin cases. In 1979, Stephen Fagan picked his daughters, then 5 (Rachael) and 2 (Wendy), up from their mother Barbara Kurth's for a weekend visit and never came home. Years later Fagan, living under the name William Martin and having changed Wendy's name to Lisa, was arrested and charged with kidnapping. Fagan claimed that he took the girls to save them from a neglectful and alcoholic mother, claims Kurth and her family deny, and was sentenced to five years probation. Both girls stood by their father throughout the trial.

      • The episode title is a Latin term literally meaning "clean slate", referring to the idea that a person's knowledge and personality are built entirely from sensory experience following birth, i.e., all nurture, no nature. The implication is that the father has such control over the inputs to his second wife's and his daughter's lives, that he is completely responsible for the devotion they show to him.

    More
    Less