Leverage

Season 3 Episode 11

The Rashomon Job

0
Aired Tuesday 10:00 PM Aug 22, 2010 on TNT
9.3
out of 10
User Rating
149 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
The team discover that viewpoints differ, when they compare notes and find out that five years ago, each of them tried to steal the same rare artifact.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • 311

    6.0
    A different kind of Leverage episode here as the gang was in a bar and we saw flashbacks, not the present, but it was just as boring as the show usually is.



    The ending was predictable as you could tell that Nate was the one who would no what happened to the dagger, or at least I hope you could tell that.



    Leverage is a better show than this, I know that it is, but lately it seems like they are not even trying anymore. 11 episodes in there and there have only been two, maybe three, good episodes so far this season.moreless
  • A light-hearted episode that doesn't take itself too seriously.

    10
    Here we get to see how the characters see each other, starting with the increasingly hilarious accents for Sophie. One of my favorite parts was the interplay between Hardison and Eliot:



    Eliot: I'm gonna go sharpen this knife. Maybe walk around the halls, in the dark. *pause* Don't leave.

    Hardison: *Extremely nervous* OK.. *worried thumbs-up*



    True, it's somewhat predictable in that you know who the remaining characters are going to be in the flashbacks ahead of time (Hardison is the one black guy, Eliot and Parker reprise cover jobs they've had in the past), so few surprises there.



    Overall, a great, light-hearted episode that doesn't take itself too seriously. My favorite episode of the series so far.moreless
Traber Burns

Traber Burns

Edgar Gladstone

Guest Star

Juan Canopii

Juan Canopii

Minister Robert Bioko

Guest Star

Riley Smith

Riley Smith

Dr. Wes Abernathy

Guest Star

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

    • When Eliot is fighting two people and receives a phone call, he has stabbed one in the leg and has the other against the wall with a knife in his shoulder.  Yet, in neither case does either stab wound show any blood, either on the victims' clothes or coming from the wounds.

  • QUOTES (4)

    • Nate: If we don't find Moreau, I might go back to prison forever.
      Sophie: Oh, shush. You did fine in prison the first time.
      Eliot: You got into shape.
      Parker: Yeah, you look good in a jump suit.
      Hardison: You learned how to hypnotize people.

    • Sophie: But when I started telling them about one of my finest jobs ever...
      Eliot: But I know she's lying.
      Hardison: She's a grifter. It's her job.
      Parker: Wait, I'm confused. Now, she's lying about lying?

    • Eliot: I'm gonna need a couple of things from you. I need your clothes, and I need your little invite to this party. This can go two ways--you can give them to me, and I can stuff you in the trunk of this car, which, by the way, looks pretty comfortable. Not a bad night. Or, you can not give them to me...and I can do exactly what you'd expect a crazy guy in your back seat to do to you. (The doctor hands over his keys) That's the right choice.

    • Sophie: It was en route. That's like stealing my mail.
      Parker: What, is stealing mail a crime? Oops.

  • NOTES (2)

  • ALLUSIONS (3)

    • Title:
      Rashomon is a 1950 movie directed by Akiro Kurosawa, and it popularized the cinematic concept of multiple unreliable narratives describing a single event. In the movie, four different characters present their description of the same event, but each description is at odds with the other. Only the final version is revealed to be the truth. The technique has been used in many movies and TV episodes since, and the "Rashomon effect" is used to refer to any example of the subjectivity of perception.

    • Sophie: Dr. Karen Ipcress from the restoration department.

      Sophie's alias is taken from the 1962 novel The IPCRESS File by Len Deighton. The novel deals with brainwashing, and IPCRESS stands for Induction of Psycho-neuroses by Conditioned Reflex under strESS.

    • Sophie: I sound like one of the dwarves in Lord of the Rings, but continue.

      Referring directly to The Lord of the Rings, a fantasy novel series by J.R.R. Tolkien (and three movies based on it) concerning the adventures of a group comprised of humans, elves and hobbits to destroy an evil ring. In the movies, the primary dwarf character is portrayed by John Rhys-Davies, who in fact is Welsh. Typically, however, dwarves are portrayed with Scottish accents in movies, TV and novels.

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