Liberty's Kids

Season 1 Episode 21

Sybil Ludington

1
Aired Unknown Sep 30, 2002 on PBS
9.8
out of 10
User Rating
11 votes
1

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Episode Summary

EDIT
James learns from the courageuos Sybil Ludington that the thought of independence not only lies in the hearts of soldiers and determined young men, but also in the hearts of determined young women. Sarah travels to Philadelphia with General Benedict Arnold and witness his passion of being ranked to a higher office in the army.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Sybil Luddington was a great woman. I never knew about her before watching this show. This was a very informative episode, as were many of the others.

    9.9
    I find it funny that you do not include any information on the girl that played the main character in this episode. She was very good. I also find it awful that the DIC Entertainment people did not say anything about her on their website. Not only did she do the voice of Sybil Luddington, but she also sings the opening song with Aaron Carter. In fact, she sings most of it! She has a great voice, and they should have given her Credit for it. Her name is Kayla Hinkle!!! She is not mentioned at all. Why not? She is a beautiful girl and did a wonderful job!moreless
Walter Cronkite

Walter Cronkite

Dr. Benjamin Franklin

Kathleen Barr

Kathleen Barr

Henri Richard Maurice Dutoit LeFebrve

Dustin Hoffman

Dustin Hoffman

Benedict Arnold

Chris Lundquist

Chris Lundquist

James Hiller

Reo Jones

Reo Jones

Sarah Philips

D. Kevin Williams

D. Kevin Williams

Moses

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • HISTORICAL CONTENT: Sixteen-year-old Sybil Ludington defies the standard view of what is proper for a young lady and makes her own courageous "midnight ride" in Westchester County, New York to help the rebels cause. Benedict Arnold fights for "respect" from Congress and grows more and more frustrated over the way he is being treated by the colonial leaders.

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